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dannyredfan

1600 loadstar

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Have a brake sticking took it apart looks like a wheel cylinder sticking   bottom  one.   

What rearend did they use. two speed gas 15752319853046013882008646820237.thumb.jpg.dd3205a4d0e6a21caffa73da1e69ff15.jpg15752320297884270284128428337455.thumb.jpg.fee36379d12d17de3843de70d6414001.jpg thanks

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The axle is normally an IH built unit but the brakes were bendix or wagner I think. Most of the wheel cylinders (and repair kits) are available.  

  What year is your loadstar?

Do you have the axle brake codes from the line setting ticket?

Thx-Ace

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Best is to pull cylinder off and you can tell size they can match you up then at parts store. Measure brake pad width and drum diameter also that helps

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I would not kit a wheel cylinder on that old of truck always replace them you'll be glad you did wheel cylinders are really affordable now I never kit one anymore once they leak they get replaced 

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I kit them when possible.  I tend to break the brake lines on these old trucks when I remove them.  Yes I am using the correct tools but they have not been off in decades and tend to strip/break.  IMHO-YMMV.  Thx-Ace

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47 minutes ago, acem said:

I kit them when possible.  I tend to break the brake lines on these old trucks when I remove them.  Yes I am using the correct tools but they have not been off in decades and tend to strip/break.  IMHO-YMMV.  Thx-Ace

On them old trucks I haven't seen a wheel cylinder yet that would clean up enough for a kit  plus some of those kits are almost as much as a new wheel cylinder is as for the brake lines only one you have to worry about is the main line the jumper lines are only a couple bucks apiece if they don't come loose I saw them off problem eliminated

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1 hour ago, acem said:

I kit them when possible.  I tend to break the brake lines on these old trucks when I remove them.  Yes I am using the correct tools but they have not been off in decades and tend to strip/break.  IMHO-YMMV.  Thx-Ace

When you do the whole job. On a few trucks maybe 10 of them I have replaced every pipe , hose and wheel cylinder. Takes about 3 days to bend up all the pipes and remove rusted cylinders then heat the adj screws to loosen them and replace star wheels. Buy the longest pieces of pipes you could and some that are close to length bend cut and flare . Those hyd brakes I fixed at least 2 a week for years

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It's a 72.  No I don't have the line ticket    the brake whould drag  guess the bottom cylinder was sticking after I got it apart it was out some taped it with a hammer and it went in.  

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On my 79 s1900 with the particular rear it had brakes were NLA...anywhere.  I forget who on here is a 30 year ih truck parts man.  He said my model axle was odd and rare.  And 0 you could do.  Cyl and pads were special...springs and mounts impossible to get etc etc.  Heaviest rear you could order if too dunce to get air brakes basically he said.  We broke down and found scrapper with a late 80s IH van truck and put axle under it.  300 bucks and new hoses were out of the shop.  It sat for 2 years as I looked for parts.  Was plow truck so corrosion was bad as well.  Works fine for our use as flatbed run around truck.

I bet a Carquest etc would have new cyl easy enough.  Spray penetrating oil on fittings now and hope.  But lines are cheap too.

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19 hours ago, dale560 said:

When you do the whole job. On a few trucks maybe 10 of them I have replaced every pipe , hose and wheel cylinder. Takes about 3 days to bend up all the pipes and remove rusted cylinders then heat the adj screws to loosen them and replace star wheels. Buy the longest pieces of pipes you could and some that are close to length bend cut and flare . Those hyd brakes I fixed at least 2 a week for years

Hardly any need to cut and flare brake lines anymore they come in 6 inch increments and you can mix and match unions connection to be almost identical to the original line lengths

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Had a brake an chassis instructor in area college that told us if a brake line wants to twist off let it. Its already compromised by rust between fitting and line and is a matter of time before it fails on its own anyway. I know we have all worked them and got a few loose but imo he was right.

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3 hours ago, ksfarmdude said:

Hardly any need to cut and flare brake lines anymore they come in 6 inch increments and you can mix and match unions connection to be almost identical to the original line lengths

Yea You can find almost premade lengths. But I guess it’s no big deal to cut and flare do it all the time.just bigger lines are harder. Always wanted to buy a new flare tool to do the gas line and bubble flare plus they are hydraulic operated. Like I said I just got in the habit of flaring and cutting.

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Can you get premade stainless steel brake lines?  I replaced my rusted lines on my GMC pickup with a stainless steel prebent package, I think it was only $90 or so, wish I'd known about them earlier.   From now on, any brake line work I do will be stainless....IMO they should be legally required OEM on all modern vehicles.  I mean, come on...all the safety s*** they demand today and then still use plain old steel pipes to the brakes??   SS probably be $10 more per car.

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The zinc coating or whatever it was used to be more than adequate for many years....i think all the good stuff has been regulated out of replacement brake lines anyway? I have replaced a couple lines twice in not many years on my last truck.....

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Here we have cooper nickel brake lines. The old steel ones are nowhere to found anymore. They are better than stainless as they are softer and can be easily bent into whatever shape you need. Stainless can be hard to bend and flare. 

John

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I like the tire in the last picture. I run some like that.

When I was a kid an old man told me 'run them till they blow. That way you won't even think about keeping them'.

Thx-Ace

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19 minutes ago, acem said:

I like the tire in the last picture. I run some like that.

When I was a kid an old man told me 'run them till they blow. That way you won't even think about keeping them'.

Thx-Ace

All the rest of the truck are new or 90%. This truck came out of Minnesota around benson mn. When it had the axle added they actually have one side not straight. I have to notch holes out of axle mount on one side and straighten it out. I think it is around 5/8 inch out of square side to side. This side scrubs the tires so we put scabby ones on

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