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Truck I cut my teeth on was that only white.  I liked it but wow did it ride rough.

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3 minutes ago, Pete1468 said:

Truck I cut my teeth on was that only white.  I liked it but wow did it ride rough.

Dated a girl in high school that... nevermind. 

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35 minutes ago, MTO said:

Then there is TWO things I didn`t know!

Unbelievable, I know...:lol:

Ummm...im guessing there are more than 2 things you dont know......😆

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1 hour ago, Dave Shepard said:

Land Rovers are aluminium, and have been for a long time. 

Seems it had to do with materials quotas, and there was plenty of aluminium left over from wartime aircraft production for the bodies.

But steel for the chassis was another issue.  Apparently steel quotas were issued in relation to pre-war export volume.  And Rover hadn't been much of an exporter then so no steel quota, even though they had a likely earner of much needed export income.  So apparently the chassis of early ones were jig saw puzzled together out of other manufacturer's scrap piles.

Socialism really gets the hang of it you know.

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25 minutes ago, Ian Beale said:

Seems it had to do with materials quotas, and there was plenty of aluminium left over from wartime aircraft production for the bodies.

But steel for the chassis was another issue.  Apparently steel quotas were issued in relation to pre-war export volume.  And Rover hadn't been much of an exporter then so no steel quota, even though they had a likely earner of much needed export income.  So apparently the chassis of early ones were jig saw puzzled together out of other manufacturer's scrap piles.

Socialism really gets the hang of it you know.

Do not believe the 2019  USA sold land rovers are aluminum.  The 1955 MGA I once had came with aluminum doors, hood and trunk lids. AND a plywood floor. With twin 6 V batteries for 12V operation. Almost forgot, real wire wheels  with tall skinny tires.

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13 hours ago, Dave Shepard said:

Land Rovers are aluminium, and have been for a long time. 

With galvanized frames. 

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18 hours ago, oleman said:

Do not believe the 2019  USA sold land rovers are aluminum.  The 1955 MGA I once had came with aluminum doors, hood and trunk lids. AND a plywood floor. With twin 6 V batteries for 12V operation. Almost forgot, real wire wheels  with tall skinny tires.

The earlier ones had a wooden frame under the sheet metal - I think the sheet part was steel.

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19 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

Seems it had to do with materials quotas, and there was plenty of aluminium left over from wartime aircraft production for the bodies.

But steel for the chassis was another issue.  Apparently steel quotas were issued in relation to pre-war export volume.  And Rover hadn't been much of an exporter then so no steel quota, even though they had a likely earner of much needed export income.  So apparently the chassis of early ones were jig saw puzzled together out of other manufacturer's scrap piles.

Socialism really gets the hang of it you know.

My old Range Rover is not so much an actual vehicle as much as it is a bunch of parts heading in generally the same direction at once

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The trophy for class 8 truck with the most aluminum goes to GMC,  they made a version of the Crackerbox tilt cab with aluminum cab, frame, and independent frt and rear suspension.  Was a short lived option, maybe 1-2 years think 1959 & '60.

IH also had forged aluminum beam type frt axles on heavy trucks,  but surprisingly it reduced weight capacity,  12,000# with steel forged axle, 10,800-10,900# capacity with aluminum forged axle.  I think IH had the option of aluminum frame rails too.

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On 11/22/2019 at 7:29 PM, Dave Shepard said:

Land Rovers are aluminium, and have been for a long time. 

My friend had a Land Rover series 1, I think it was a 52, left hand drive, apparently kind of rare to have one that early with left hand drive

It was a complete aluminum body, the frame and gas tank were steel, and had their faults, but the floor pans were solid

His Dad and his friends had a fleet of them way back, for hunt camp/bush use, brake parts were hard to get in the 90s, they claimed the brakes were the front bumper and the nearest tree

It was a tank, especially after us bracing the front bumper to improve the braking system, we stopped driving it due to a failed water pump that we couldn’t repair within our budget at that time, it was sold to a collector from NY state eventually 
 

 

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1 hour ago, IHKeith said:

My friend had a Land Rover series 1, I think it was a 52, left hand drive, apparently kind of rare to have one that early with left hand drive

It was a complete aluminum body, the frame and gas tank were steel, and had their faults, but the floor pans were solid

His Dad and his friends had a fleet of them way back, for hunt camp/bush use, brake parts were hard to get in the 90s, they claimed the brakes were the front bumper and the nearest tree

It was a tank, especially after us bracing the front bumper to improve the braking system, we stopped driving it due to a failed water pump that we couldn’t repair within our budget at that time, it was sold to a collector from NY state eventually 
 

 

The very early ones ran four wheel drive engagement with an arrangement like rover's "freewheel" system

http://forum.retro-rides.org/thread/79217

Apparently that was replaced pretty quickly by the "yellow button"

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I was trying to call my buddy tonight to confirm the details of the year and model number, but he didn’t answer, this one definitely didn’t freewheel, it had engine braking, don’t ever remember grinding gears in it and it I doubt it was synchronized, it was a four cylinder engine, different than the series 2 engine, as I recall you could put it in 2 hi, 2 lo, 4 hi, 4 lo, it was a 3 speed, speed transmission, my buddy who owned it, McMac I call him, always thought it was a 39-45 or something like that but when he sold it the guy said it was a 52 or so, can’t recall exactly, I don’t know everything but thinking of McMac’s earlier years estimate I doubt it because of WW2, it did have military looking green paint as it’s original coat, it was years after the water pump failed that a fellow who knew about Rovers happened by, he was excited by the left hand drive, eventually Mc sold it, nowadays 15 years later, we probably could of found some parts on the internet, but also nowadays there isn’t 200 dollar Land Rovers sitting at your neighbour’s house that will run with a tune up, I’m appreciative of being able to experience the Rover, as well as the more common Suzuki, S10 Blazer bush buggy

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Production started in 1948.  Used a 4 cylinder F head engine (overhead and side valve).  Series 2 had a bigger 4 cylinder OHV engine, same basic engine for petrol or diesel.  One diesel around here has worn out 2 landrovers and is on its 3rd.

Not sure how the "freewheel" worked but I don't think it freewheeled.  More that it picked up front wheel drive when the rears spun.  Wasn't used for very long - only reason I heard about it was from a bloke that had one from new.

Should have been a 4-speed box - I don't think there was anything much coming out of UK after WW2 with a 3-speed..  A long while since my driving of a Series 1 but IIRC you had 2wd high,, and 4wd high with the yellow button pressed,  4wd low with the other lever.  One cause of complaint was you had to go into 4wd low and back out to get from 4wd high back to 2wd high.

Some info here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_Rover

https://www.ifixit.com/Wiki/The_History_of_Land_Rover_-_Small_Beginnings-Big_Results

 

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One form of aluminium body construction and a few names that used it

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superleggera

Also on using aluminium.  There is the flex life problem i.e the number of bending cycles. Steel has one, but it depends on the load, so longer with light loads.  Aluminium has one that is independent of load (hence air frame lifes and crack replacement programs).  So might be problematic for, say, a truck chassis.  Head tennis racquets were a good example in my experience.

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7 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

One form of aluminium body construction and a few names that used it

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superleggera

Also on using aluminium.  There is the flex life problem i.e the number of bending cycles. Steel has one, but it depends on the load, so longer with light loads.  Aluminium has one that is independent of load (hence air frame lifes and crack replacement programs).  So might be problematic for, say, a truck chassis.  Head tennis racquets were a good example in my experience.

Absolutely true about life cycle and cracking. Those old cabovers that had aluminum frames usually had cracks. Buddy had a 73 or so freightliner it burned setting next to his garage. The frame melted and sagged the body must have Ben aluminum because it was mostly gone. Brother used to work at a bank. He said one of the customers actually bought steel frame rails from dealer to replace aluminum on his ihc truck. Replaced one side at a time with premade factory rail.

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