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Mountain Heritage

FD resignation - wow!

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I’m posting this to help understand the odd feeling....

I sent my resignation letter to Chief this morning after over 20 years on a volunteer FD. It was extremely difficult to write the letter and hit send. Why is that?  I feel really weird right now. The wife said it’s because it’s a big drop in my life and I’ve been doing it a long time. I’m giving up the dangerous stuff and the hard work of doing training (been a training officer for over 15 years and a Captain for almost 6 years now).  I’m sure that’s part of it, just really weird feeling???

Will I miss the department and fellow members - yes for sure.   Just didn’t think it would feel like this. Maybe because I’m not a person who often shows emotion about things like this?

Is it just me or have others in my situation felt like this when hanging up their hat, or in this example their helmet?

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Your community is indebted for your years of service!  There is a time for everything, as the Teacher wrote in Ecclesiastes.  I hope you are able to find peace in your decision, I'm sure you have trained enough guys to fill your shoes on the department.   Thanks for your willing service! :-)

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I resigned from a board recently. I was president, and I had presided over it's resurrection and had done many great things. I gave ample warning and helped set them up for future success before I officially signed off. It was the right thing to do though for me, my family, and the future of the organization. It was weird however. So what did I do? I joined the local volunteer FD and got a friend to join with me.

I don't know about your situation, but I fill empty holes as soon as I can find them. I don't know if others consider it right or wrong, but it's what I do. If there's something you've wanted to do and the FD was taking up all your time, go do that. As much as we all want to feel valuable -me as much as anyone- most groups we belong do were around before us, and they'll be around without us.

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20 minutes ago, Mountain Heritage said:

I’m posting this to help understand the odd feeling....

I sent my resignation letter to Chief this morning after over 20 years on a volunteer FD. It was extremely difficult to write the letter and hit send. Why is that?  I feel really weird right now. The wife said it’s because it’s a big drop in my life and I’ve been doing it a long time. I’m giving up the dangerous stuff and the hard work of doing training (been a training officer for over 15 years and a Captain for almost 6 years now).  I’m sure that’s part of it, just really weird feeling???

Will I miss the department and fellow members - yes for sure.   Just didn’t think it would feel like this. Maybe because I’m not a person who often shows emotion about things like this?

Is it just me or have others in my situation felt like this when hanging up their hat, or in this example their helmet?

I understand completely. When I retired from the Army I had a couple of years that were tuff. In the Army I felt I was doing something important then went to being a sillyvilian just interested in a paycheck. I learned that feeling like that is not uncommon for police, firefighters, EMS personnel and military members.

Rick

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The boards and groups I am active in create many emotions.

The lack of participation from others is frustrating.

The lack of logic is equally so.

The lack of "young" members is just sad.

Public apathy has grown out of proportion.

That creeps into groups as they are made up of the apathetic public.

Many times I have considered "throwing in the towel"

But I am not ready to quit yet.

It doesn`t seem to matter how much we have done in the past.

It doesn`t matter how crucial our efforts have been.

We will STILL be deemed a quitter.

We do what we feel is best in our individual situations as only WE know all the factors, nobody else does. 

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That was a tough decision ,but be at peace with it I have been on are Fire Department 34+ years and thinking of retiring in spring ,a nd have had various officers positions for 29 of those years and feel you had the hardest job on the force as  training officer. I think the longest we had one go is about 5 years, setting up trainings that are not fluff takes a lot of time and resources  I commend you very much for 15 years of that . Remember some of what was trained in you tenure will be used by a guy that was a newbie 20 years from now Thank you for your efforts now you will have some spare time to fill ,find another hobby! 

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I’m probably not the best person for this because I struggle giving up stuff . I’m working on my 22nd year on the fire department,I’ve thought about quitting a few times when I’ve been PO’d about something, always ended up sticking it out. 

20 years is a long time, thanks for the service you have provided. Jump while he’s moving, tip your hat and walk away. 

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know the feeling, i retired from the fire department after 25 five years, felt like you did for the first year thinking i could not be replaced but as usual ther is someone who steps up and does your duties as good or better than i did. enjoyed my time of service but age catches up to a guy. some fresh bodys on the department is good with new ideas and thought.

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Dad had over 40 yrs on our local fire dept, as he got older, he took a leave of absence, and ran for a trustee position on the dept board.  He won the position and served two terms, and it allowed him to still be involved with the dept. although no longer an active firefighter/EMT.  Had he not won I'm sure he would have remained a member although I'd guess as an engineer.

Quick edit: we had the local FD insignia engraved on his headstone.  The FD meant ALOT to him.

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I have never been on the FD but had to help a volunteer FD out one time when they was short of help. The guys on the department knew me and flagged me down to help. So I did get alittle feel of what you guys do and go thru out there. I want to THANK all you guys/gals out there.  THANKS FOR ALL YOUR time and service's.

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No individual is bigger than an organization. The reason you wonder if you gave enough is because you got so much.It's impossible to give back more than you received because you benefited from the input of the entire department . That's the only way it works.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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was never on a department seems like milking cows would of made it hard, however I did get on our new merged district board a few years ago. had a meeting last night, its scary when you look at the age of the volunteers there are very few young people joining, you look around and everybody looks about 60 years old. you were very generous with your time.

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1 hour ago, pt756 said:

was never on a department seems like milking cows would of made it hard, however I did get on our new merged district board a few years ago. had a meeting last night, its scary when you look at the age of the volunteers there are very few young people joining, you look around and everybody looks about 60 years old. you were very generous with your time.

Interesting point about milking cows PT, back in the day (until probably the early 90s)  here in town the FD meetings/practices started at 8pm....after the guys had finished milking for the evening.  Probably 1/2 the department were farmers.

 

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I quit after 38 years.  I missed it for a while.  Now, when I hear the siren blowing in the dead of winter, I think it is OK not to have to go.

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Why must you quit cold turkey?

Ours kept the people like us on for the social events and for your wisdom and experience.

You just don't answer calls.

You remain a part of the department but just step down a bit.

You may be older but you also are a lot smarter.

And if a total disaster strikes, you know you would do what you can.

 

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It takes a certain personality to volunteer. You have to be willing to drop what you are doing for yourself to go help someone else. You may be trying to get the hay baled up before the rain you see coming at you. You may be working cattle when the pager goes off. You may be getting ready to go to your son's wedding rehearsal. You are a volunteer, you don't have to go..........................but you do, always. It is in you. It is a source of pride. It fulfills the need to help others. I have been on our VFD for 23 years now and Sec/Treas for the last ten. I will have to take mandatory retirement in 10 years when I'm 70. There will be a lot of things I won't miss. Those of you who are on a dept know what they are, I'm sure they are pretty much the same the country over. But there will be a hole in me that I'm not sure I can completely fill with something else. Good luck and know that you did your service to your community and rest easy in the fact you are making room for someone else to step up and fulfill their need to serve. 

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One of the undeniable facts of modern life is the best people,the very ones you need as volunteers are buried in their jobs. It's reflected in church,fraternal organizations,local boards and political office as well as volunteerism

 

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I resigned with 29 years on volunteer FD, over half of that time as the Chief or Assistant Chief. Missed it for a couple years but the longer I was gone, the less I missed it. Less stress, politics and general BS.

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Thanks for your commitment to a great cause. One of the most important things a person can do is directly make a positive impact on other human lives. I cant help you out with your feelings now, maybe in 35 years you can help me with mine😉

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12 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Why must you quit cold turkey?

Ours kept the people like us on for the social events and for your wisdom and experience.

You just don't answer calls.

You remain a part of the department but just step down a bit.

You may be older but you also are a lot smarter.

And if a total disaster strikes, you know you would do what you can.

 

Absolutely my thoughts 110%

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