Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
KWRB

War Year Tractors

Recommended Posts

I picked up an OS-6 a few years ago that's waiting its turn in line. I don't recall the serial number and can't get to it right quick. I did notice the other day, for the first time, that the shifter knob is the cast iron (cast steel, according to some online info?) one. I know I can look up the serial number to find out if it is truly a war year tractor, but it's not an option at the moment.

So my question is, other than cast shifter knobs, what else is different or special about war year machines?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is is cast iron not cast steel. The radiator cores had steel fins instead of copper and the grill emblem was made of steel instead of aluminum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just about every IH plant with a major product line had a foundry, that poured grey iron. They had one dedicated ductile or nodular iron foundry, the other iron foundries maybe poured a bit of ductile as required. I don't know of a one that poured steel. The hardware to produce the two materials is different, and the processes lots different, I only knew ONE foundry that poured both iron and steel, quality on either was terrible, and they went belly-UP 20 years ago. IH did have several shops that forged steel, Louisville had a huge forge shop, Canton, and Indy. Forging is stronger, much much less chance of defects, like sand inclusions, or slag inclusions. And the real forging benefit is much nearer to a net shape part.  The fact so many people weld up the very bottom of the shift lever, means it's steel, so a 99+% chance it's forged.

Had a Deeroid try to tell me his Dad bought two 706 gas tractors back around 1964, said they had ALUMINUM engine blocks. IH bought a few die cast aluminum castings, but they sure as heck did NOT cast or buy aluminum cylinder blocks.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doctor Evil, I believe that. I believe it's iron. No reason for it to be steel. There isn't any stress on it to justify making it from steel.

I'm more interested in -IF it's a war year machine- what else would be different about it. It seems the only thing that would be visible would be the shifter knob.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The war production machines suffered from lack of pigment in the paint. Everything was in short supply due to the war effort.   The original paint had an orange hue to it.  Grandpa's H has patches of it showing through the repaint.

20190607_203900.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My M is a 1944, has a cast iron shift knob - there is a number on it which I guess is the part number 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well on Classic Tractor Fever I saw a wartime Farmall H and a two bottom little Genius plow that was believed by the owner to be a wartime plow. The H was a 1942 model and it had steel wheels and no lights and electrical system. There was some other things too that indicated it as a wartime tractor. When I get a minute I’ll post a link of the video 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 46 W6 that has a metal knob. Not sure that a metal knob is a good indicator it is a war year tractor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, timbo1946 said:

I have a 46 W6 that has a metal knob. Not sure that a metal knob is a good indicator it is a war year tractor

i agree. I thought this OS-6 was a post-war machine, but still haven't had the time to check the serial.

I've never heard of the wheatland format letter series tractors (or the corresponding orchards) having steel wheels so I highly doubt mine ever should have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could 46 have been a transition year where they finished using up wartime parts? Also its been a looong time since any of these were made. Anything is possible in that amount of time, as far as parts swapping...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 1944 BN has a cast shift knob and a simple stamped front emblem.
 

599D0FB7-3EB7-4935-A3C8-A76707DEBCB9.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, KWRB said:

i agree. I thought this OS-6 was a post-war machine, but still haven't had the time to check the serial.

I've never heard of the wheatland format letter series tractors (or the corresponding orchards) having steel wheels so I highly doubt mine ever should have.

I would be interested in your serial number. I have two 1946 OS 6s and a 46 W6. I wonder where they all fall in relation to each other. BTY the OS6 s both have rubber shift knobs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, TomH said:

My 1944 BN has a cast shift knob and a simple stamped front emblem.
 

599D0FB7-3EB7-4935-A3C8-A76707DEBCB9.jpeg

A question for you Tom: is that emblem different in style from the aluminum ones pre- and post-war, or is it only different in the material used?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look like this? 

 

IMG_20190923_101420973_HDR.thumb.jpg.d4f96aa4ae317f4c9c03ce115bd3b8fb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a '44 B, but the gear shift knob is plastic - could be a replacement.

1944 Farmall B right_1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a war year machine! built in 1945, the first yer of the OS-6. It's in fact very early in the OS-6 run. It's not quite the oldest known, and I can't say where exactly in sequence it is among the 831 built, because it shared serial numbers with the W-6 and O-6, but it's early.

When I bought it, they said it was a '49, so I'm very pleasantly surprised!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 1945 H is set up the same way. Iron shift knob and a steel Farmall emblem on the front. My emblem is the same just made of steel. Mine has white letters but I don't know if that part is original or just how they came. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine when rubber was available after the war effort, there was probably a great demand for the tire industry catching up on tires for the automotive and farm applications. Rubber shift knobs were  probably made  when material was available to make them. Cost and supply would probably explain the on and off use of rubber shift knobs after the war. This just purely a guess on my part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/21/2019 at 5:25 AM, KWRB said:

A question for you Tom: is that emblem different in style from the aluminum ones pre- and post-war, or is it only different in the material used?

The first picture is an original 1940 H emblem made of aluminum. The second is 1944 BN which is steel and not as “detailed “ I doubt the. Letters were black as others I’ve seen were just plain metal with no paint.

327C2A83-52CC-4F79-86AA-079A142B1B5E.thumb.jpeg.2210fe90bf970c95b2d7f8a8a1a1a02a.jpeg987F1E3F-86C3-48FF-B693-FD7CA3FE52BD.thumb.jpeg.687fba8ef4dd5136808bc60d264ee77b.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...