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tractor hours mixer tractors

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2 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

I have a question for you dairy guys.

Why do you use tractor ran mixers instead of mounting them on a truck like cattle guys do in the big feedlots out west? We had a neighbor with a mixer mounted on a truck when they were feeding cattle. You don't see any dairy guys doing this.

Next township to the east has a big dairy in it and they bought a chunk of land a few years ago and built a setup to raise their replacement heifers. All the feed storage is at the main farm so many times a day they are running a tractor and mixer down the road 4 and a half miles one way. A truck would be faster and less wear on the tractor tires. Truck tires are cheaper than a set of tractors.

Main thing is capacity.  In California and ID lots of trucks.  But changing.  You have 3 400 cow pens that is 30 to 40k of TMR.  So 1600 to 2000cuft mixer.  Truck would break in half.  Also friends say its easier to teach tractor than truck. Also big teuck mixers are super tall for road trips now.  A 1400 on a truck would be 14+ tall.  Then you need a hi lift loader too.  Getting more common is big feed boxes behind 150hp tractors or trucks and stationary elec drive mixers.  Few around and guys are happy.  We just had this talk... A new truck an mixer box would be at least $300000.  Crap a rebuilt 1100 Laird box on a 8000hr Volvo was listed at $245000 in ID.  The wagon ee got was $75000 and we have a tractor.  When tractor dies we will get another sq magnum with 7 to 10k hours on for $40k and get 10k more.  If tractor breaks swap it in 20 and go.  Truck breaks you are SOL.  But again its capacity alot of the time.  Also...frankly Hispanics and trucks just dont mix.  Look at ones coming over border!  A used feed truck in farmfresh condition is nearly worthless.  

Many ways to skin the cat

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On 11/10/2019 at 1:44 PM, bitty said:

I had to go to the farm (problem with the mixing tractor) today so I looked at the hours.  The clock is turned it has 22,203 hours on it now . We bought the tractor with 9800 (I think) hours or so. The fuel filters here you can see when they were changed last and the hours then compared to the hours now and figure approximate usage time. Although I know last January or February we had the transmission apart to fix a twisted output shaft in the speed trans. So you can see in May of 18 at 16, 397 hours

IMG_20191110_134844316_HDR.jpg

Bitty are you saying you have over 6k hours on your fuel filter? Wow that means you all take extra precautions on your fuel tanks to get that many hours on one filter. That's some serious hours on your rig for little over a year. Awesome 

Edit. After reading again i think you meant that's an old picture. 

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5 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

I have a question for you dairy guys.

Why do you use tractor ran mixers instead of mounting them on a truck like cattle guys do in the big feedlots out west? We had a neighbor with a mixer mounted on a truck when they were feeding cattle. You don't see any dairy guys doing this.

Next township to the east has a big dairy in it and they bought a chunk of land a few years ago and built a setup to raise their replacement heifers. All the feed storage is at the main farm so many times a day they are running a tractor and mixer down the road 4 and a half miles one way. A truck would be faster and less wear on the tractor tires. Truck tires are cheaper than a set of tractors.

Truck needs to have a PTO type drive for the mixer. One brand has a PTO coming out of the bell housing that can transfer enough horsepower. Hydrostatic drive is not the best with the amount of hp required

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6 minutes ago, Missouri Mule said:

Bitty are you saying you have over 6k hours on your fuel filter? Wow that means you all take extra precautions on your fuel tanks to get that many hours on one filter. That's some serious hours on your rig for little over a year. Awesome 

I originally posted the hours incorrect by making it 20,220 but it's actually 22,203 

Yes we have a bunch of hours on the fuel filters. We try to keep it clean as possible. We go through 40k or so per year so it doesn't sit in the tanks long. We have two 1000 gallon tanks with off-road and they said inside of a three-sided building so they are shaded

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6 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

I have a question for you dairy guys.

Why do you use tractor ran mixers instead of mounting them on a truck like cattle guys do in the big feedlots out west? We had a neighbor with a mixer mounted on a truck when they were feeding cattle. You don't see any dairy guys doing this.

Next township to the east has a big dairy in it and they bought a chunk of land a few years ago and built a setup to raise their replacement heifers. All the feed storage is at the main farm so many times a day they are running a tractor and mixer down the road 4 and a half miles one way. A truck would be faster and less wear on the tractor tires. Truck tires are cheaper than a set of tractors.

Problems with a truck is limited weight carrying capacity and it makes the mixers too tall to load with a wheel loader.  

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4 minutes ago, Cliff Neubauer said:

Problems with a truck is limited weight carrying capacity and it makes the mixers too tall to load with a wheel loader.  

So, my next question is how do the big feedlots make it work?

I got caught behind these feedmixers being pulled down the road and thought that the number of times a day they do this being able to get above 25 mph to go between the sites may save some time and wear on a tractor. Its like when we graduated from running tractor and gravity flow wagons to town hauling grain to our semi truck. Quicker i get there, the quicker I turn around.

I have to admit. Im in awe in the amount of hours you guys put on your tractors. The only tractors on the place that probably have over 10,000 hrs are the H and 460. Everything else is South of that mark. Our 1981 786 has 8270 hrs on it. Original and its taken almost 40 years to get there. And yes we have livestock. Just different way of doing things. 

 

 

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I just realized that we put over 10k hours on the reman engine already

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10 hours ago, Gearclash said:

I have a fuel pressure gauge on my Dodge Cummins pickup and that is what I go by to determine when the fuel filter needs to be changed.  As long as the pressure is normal, the filter is fine.  When pressure starts to drop off more than normal during WOT, time for new filter.  It is very interesting that the time between filter changes is anything but consistent.  

I had a fuel pressure gauge on my 766 and used it the same way.  I would change the primary as soon as I noticed any drop in pressure.  Never had issues.

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5 minutes ago, Reichow7120 said:

So, my next question is how do the big feedlots make it work?

I got caught behind these feedmixers being pulled down the road and thought that the number of times a day they do this being able to get above 25 mph to go between the sites may save some time and wear on a tractor. Its like when we graduated from running tractor and gravity flow wagons to town hauling grain to our semi truck. Quicker i get there, the quicker I turn around.

I have to admit. Im in awe in the amount of hours you guys put on your tractors. The only tractors on the place that probably have over 10,000 hrs are the H and 460. Everything else is South of that mark. Our 1981 786 has 8270 hrs on it. Original and its taken almost 40 years to get there. And yes we have livestock. Just different way of doing things. 

 

 

Keep in mind that at a big dairy the guy hauling feed is probably making $12/hr and probably doesn't speak English, not a lot of incentive to spend a couple hundred grand to save him 20 minutes a day of road time.

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Truck mounted mixers is all you see around here on the big feed lots.  Most guys using tractors on mixers are just regular ranchers. 

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I commonly carefully drain my oil (CenPeCo last 30 years) into clean containers so that my old timer neighbor can pour it In to his old timer tractors. He likes my used antifreeze too. And hytran.  I've been changing hyd filters yearly (100-200hr tops) my entire life, on tractors that never sit outdoors ever.  I'll admit, I almost puked a little when I started seeing some of the hyd filter/screen pics posted on here. You know...the auction buy ones  that look like they have a slab of hay, quart of milk replacer, and a dead cat stuck in them....and then the guys say that they bought the machine cheap, drove it home, changed the filter and everything works!   But but newer hyd filters are soo expensive. Our loaders are just a mx115 and a sr220 (half the machine the old 75xt was....I miss it.) and I think the hyd and fuel filters for them were $350 last spring.  I don't think that was with any engine oil filters, and no air filters.  I don't think I'm changing them next spring. I checked the hrs today...MX got 200 and the skidsteer is at 90. 

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We use used antifreeze in the 5.9, 3.9, etc anything without a wet sleeve engine. We use used hytran in the skidloaders. I did put used hytran in the C for when I get it going to help flush out the milky goop 

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The farm I was at had a mixer truck built for feeding. The truck shop lengthened the frame and a patz twin screw vertical mixer was placed on it. Then they did all the plumbing and electrical work. It has a tandem pump set up on the front of the truck that runs the mixer. The truck worked ok but there was room for improvement. The biggest thing was if something happened to the truck it needed to be fixed now, luckily the farm still had a tow behind mixer for a back up. 

I'm surprised that none of the equipment manufacturers have built a mixer on a trailer that could hook to a fifth wheel and be pulled with a semi tractor. It would have to be self contained with its own power source, depending on the size of the mixer I would think 150 to 200 hp would do it, and hydraulics to operate the functions that could be remote operated from the cab.

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

Truck mounted mixers is all you see around here on the big feed lots.  Most guys using tractors on mixers are just regular ranchers. 

I frankly think alot of that is "what we do".  Look at the size of the boxes.  But you prob have some big Lots round there so they cant be petite.  I see tons of single axle trucks in the heartland with 400cuft rotomixers.  Makes no sense to me if you are not going down the road.

 

2 hours ago, Cliff Neubauer said:

Keep in mind that at a big dairy the guy hauling feed is probably making $12/hr and probably doesn't speak English, not a lot of incentive to spend a couple hundred grand to save him 20 minutes a day of road time.

Fwiw a feeder has made 20plus a hour here for 15 years.  Running the most expensive equip with the biggest cost of production.  Its just capacity.  Wheeled mixers even have brakes now on big ones.  An tractors go 30 pretty common now.  And you can swap units pretty easy if a breakdown.  Which is huge when you have 4000 mouths mooing!

2 hours ago, Cliff Neubauer said:

Problems with a truck is limited weight carrying capacity and it makes the mixers too tall to load with a wheel loader.  

Exactly and most places dont give wt tickets to tractors.  Imagine a truck with a twin screw vert loaded with 35000# (or 40k of tmg) of feed.  That 3/4 axle truck would wt at least 75000.  Here...youd have a problem.

 

4 hours ago, bitty said:

Truck needs to have a PTO type drive for the mixer. One brand has a PTO coming out of the bell housing that can transfer enough horsepower. Hydrostatic drive is not the best with the amount of hp required

Most out west Tim use a front pump off the crank.  Just simply for constant power.  My old little one for the dry cows was a pto with pulley/belt drive.  Then we got dry cows 1/2 mile away instead of 4 and scrapped the mixer and made a flatbed truck.  Friends just put togther a horizontal kirby truck...prob only guys with a horizontal now.  The gear boxes to get up to mixer from trans were $1000s

42 minutes ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

 

I'm surprised that none of the equipment manufacturers have built a mixer on a trailer that could hook to a fifth wheel and be pulled with a semi tractor. It would have to be self contained with its own power source, depending on the size of the mixer I would think 150 to 200 hp would do it, and hydraulics to operate the functions that could be remote operated from the cab.

Loewen from BC just across the line built one for Dieperslues (sp) in Tulare like 10 years ago.  1400 cuft horizontal on a lowboy type trailer with 250hp JD on front.  He then used old auction trucks to drag it around.  Made some sense.  Wire to hydro/elc valves to run.  The salesman said the delivery truck to CA had to get over wt permits to get there.  WA and OR allow 105500 normally...and it was over that.

Now i think.....I swear it was on a auction bill few years ago.  Friends dad is manager on that dairy.  I should see how it worked.  They didnt get another so.....

Be so long...but idea is logical

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10 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

I have a question for you dairy guys.

Why do you use tractor ran mixers instead of mounting them on a truck like cattle guys do in the big feedlots out west? We had a neighbor with a mixer mounted on a truck when they were feeding cattle. You don't see any dairy guys doing this.

Next township to the east has a big dairy in it and they bought a chunk of land a few years ago and built a setup to raise their replacement heifers. All the feed storage is at the main farm so many times a day they are running a tractor and mixer down the road 4 and a half miles one way. A truck would be faster and less wear on the tractor tires. Truck tires are cheaper than a set of tractors.

Trucks just don't like tight spaces and you can't see near good enough.

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There is a big difference in the volume per head that a feedlot feeds and a dairy.  The poundage per head required for a dairy cow is a lot more than a beef animal.  The mixers some of these dairies use are huge, bigger than what a truck could handle.

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Just now, Gearclash said:

There is a big difference in the volume per head that a feedlot feeds and a dairy.  The poundage per head required for a dairy cow is a lot more than a beef animal.  The mixers some of these dairies use are huge, bigger than what a truck could handle.

👍  

What is a finishing angus get per day?  My holsteins eat 100 to 110# +/- wet tmr per head per day.  The High grouo is 165 hd and gets 20000#.  36000 calories a day

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5 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

👍  

What is a finishing angus get per day?  My holsteins eat 100 to 110# +/- wet tmr per head per day.  The High grouo is 165 hd and gets 20000#.  36000 calories a day

I'd say feeders get less than half the as fed poundage per day.  Interesting comparison, I bet my brother and I are feeding nearly the same load size right now, he is feeding that load to around 130 hd milk cows twice a day, I’m feeding about 160 hd of 1000 lb feeders once a day.  My DM is somewhat higher.  Most times as fed intakes are in the 30s lb per day for a finishing ration.

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21 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

I frankly think alot of that is "what we do".  Look at the size of the boxes.  But you prob have some big Lots round there so they cant be petite.  I see tons of single axle trucks in the heartland with 400cuft rotomixers.  Makes no sense to me if you are not going down the road.

 

Fwiw a feeder has made 20plus a hour here for 15 years.  Running the most expensive equip with the biggest cost of production.  Its just capacity.  Wheeled mixers even have brakes now on big ones.  An tractors go 30 pretty common now.  And you can swap units pretty easy if a breakdown.  Which is huge when you have 4000 mouths mooing!

Exactly and most places dont give wt tickets to tractors.  Imagine a truck with a twin screw vert loaded with 35000# (or 40k of tmg) of feed.  That 3/4 axle truck would wt at least 75000.  Here...youd have a problem.

 

Most out west Tim use a front pump off the crank.  Just simply for constant power.  My old little one for the dry cows was a pto with pulley/belt drive.  Then we got dry cows 1/2 mile away instead of 4 and scrapped the mixer and made a flatbed truck.  Friends just put togther a horizontal kirby truck...prob only guys with a horizontal now.  The gear boxes to get up to mixer from trans were $1000s

Loewen from BC just across the line built one for Dieperslues (sp) in Tulare like 10 years ago.  1400 cuft horizontal on a lowboy type trailer with 250hp JD on front.  He then used old auction trucks to drag it around.  Made some sense.  Wire to hydro/elc valves to run.  The salesman said the delivery truck to CA had to get over wt permits to get there.  WA and OR allow 105500 normally...and it was over that.

Now i think.....I swear it was on a auction bill few years ago.  Friends dad is manager on that dairy.  I should see how it worked.  They didnt get another so.....

Be so long...but idea is logical

Darn! They took my idea.

I always thought that if you only drove through barns or drive by bunks it would be great. Maneuvering in a barnyard would be a challenge.

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Around here it is a mix of trucks and tractors on TMR mixers. Trucks work of if set up for it but they are hard to get around in the winter, don't work good in older barns and tight quarters. If truck breaks down your SOL, if tractor breaks, just switch to another. We run 2 mixers that run 10+ hours a day, that puts hours on quickly. I would dare say the majority of feeding tractors around here are well over 20,000 hours.

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Yeah but my experience from guys around here is that normally it was the mixer that broke more than the truck carrying the mixer. Mixer breaks. You're SOL anyway. Tractor pulled or truck carried. 

I guess i have a hard time flogging the **** out of a tractor feeding cows. I realize that we feed differently so we don't rack up the hours on our stuff. There are tractors on this farm that have been here longer than I've been on this planet. If we were putting on the amount of hours you guys are, there is no way that would happen. Heavy speced trucks are a dime a dozen around here. ( Michigan Specials are easy to come by) The Cattle Feedlots that were big enough to need mixers always had trucks. No dairy around me other than the one i mentioned above were ever big enough to run big mixers. 

Different environments. Beef guys wouldn't do as well with all the stuff dairy guys do to pamper a dairy cow and dairy guys would have some real issues handling some of the high strung headhunters Beef cattle you run into sometimes.

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6 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

Yeah but my experience from guys around here is that normally it was the mixer that broke more than the truck carrying the mixer. Mixer breaks. You're SOL anyway. Tractor pulled or truck carried. 

I guess i have a hard time flogging the **** out of a tractor feeding cows. I realize that we feed differently so we don't rack up the hours on our stuff. There are tractors on this farm that have been here longer than I've been on this planet. If we were putting on the amount of hours you guys are, there is no way that would happen. Heavy speced trucks are a dime a dozen around here. ( Michigan Specials are easy to come by) The Cattle Feedlots that were big enough to need mixers always had trucks. No dairy around me other than the one i mentioned above were ever big enough to run big mixers. 

Different environments. Beef guys wouldn't do as well with all the stuff dairy guys do to pamper a dairy cow and dairy guys would have some real issues handling some of the high strung headhunters Beef cattle you run into sometimes.

I know a couple of dairy guys who go down south and buy a 10k hour 2wd 7130 for $12k and use them for mixer tractors.  The one guy said his mixer tractor gets a 250 hr oil change every 21 days during the winter, he has ran a couple past 30k hours before engine overhauls and his record for a Magnum transmission is 54k before rebuilding.  He has a spare tractor or two and a backup mixer, redundancy is cheaper than the depreciation of something newer and potentially more reliable.  

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Just now, Cliff Neubauer said:

I know a couple of dairy guys who go down south and buy a 10k hour 2wd 7130 for $12k and use them for mixer tractors.  The one guy said his mixer tractor gets a 250 hr oil change every 21 days during the winter, he has ran a couple past 30k hours before engine overhauls and his record for a Magnum transmission is 54k before rebuilding.  He has a spare tractor or two and a backup mixer, redundancy is cheaper than the depreciation of something newer and potentially more reliable.  

X2

We have an old mixer for a spare. Our new one is 11 months old. Previous one we bought new was in '05 

Our spare we bought used in really good shape and used most of the life of it up and now it's a spare

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Fwiw.... it is not running the crap out of a tractor feeding.  They last 10 to 50k hours.  Cant be that hard one it if it last that long.  Long steady pto work.  Like a highway patrol car.  Nearly "free" hours or miles humming 

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Trucks give more trouble in ways imo at least when we hauled silage with them

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