Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
vtfireman85

Winter Diesel engine oil weight

Recommended Posts

All summer I have been using 15-40 in my 6.5. I changed the oil a week or so ago, never gave it much thought, and put 15-40 back in. 

We had a cold snap the last few days, just so happened I had been doing an exhaust on it so it was out of commission for a bit. When I went to start it the other morning it was about 20 degrees, not plugged in, one round with the glow plugs and she took off, clattered something awful eventually smoothed our enough I went back inside to let it warm up. All of a sudden she starts surging and snorting and smoking, by the time I had run back it smithed out again. Last night was even colder, I got home about 7, plugged it in, had a fire call at 11 she fired up and purred like a kitten. Same deal at 8 this morning at about 15 degrees. Didn’t plug it in at work started it up  at 430 at about 30 degrees and it clattered something awful for a while. 

Long winded way of me saying I think my oil is too thick. Oil pressure does come up ok and it always has good OP it makes sense to me it seems even worse because of the exhaust. 

What do you guys run? Is there a standard based on ambient temp? 

As it is with 15-40 it uses About 3/4 quart of oil in 3000 miles. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15-40 year round. We have one Magnum that sees 2-3K hours per year used everyday for mixing feed. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, bitty said:

15-40 year round. We have one Magnum that sees 2-3K hours per year used everyday for mixing feed. 

I’ve always run it in the tractors, never plugged them in either, but I don’t believe they have hydraulic lifters either 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15w-40 is fine year round but if it gets below 0 where you are you could look at 10w-30... it gets below 0 often here and I stick with 15w-40... what is your fuel situation? Bio diesel untreated will have gelling issues around 20 degrees.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry in advance?....

 

Psh, no you're not!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

run 15W40 year round in truck and tractor also run Motorkote Hyper Lubricant sure seens to helpwith start up noise's. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have run 15-40 all the way to the arctic circle and north to the ocean in 6.5's and many other engines with no problems, from 90* above to 65* below, no problems from the oil. I would look for the problem elsewhere 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Chevy 6.5 Turbo diesel usually got plugged in to a timer for a few hours before starting it if it was below 20 degrees and I always used 15w 40.  My first 7.3 Powerstroke I used 10w30 in the winter and rarely plugged it in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run 15W-40 in all my diesels, but they get plugged in pretty religiously if temps get much below freezing.  If I were to not plug them in I would very much consider running either 10W-30 or even 5W-40.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I ran my 7.3L PSD every day year round I'd put 2 changes of 10W-30 Rotella in it every winter instead of the 15W-40 I normally used.  Said to do it right in the Powerstroke owners manual.  Had a cold snap sneak up on me one year. Was below zero in early AM,  was around Zero when I'd have to start it after work. Truck stayed in my insulated shop with block heater plugged in every night, starting at home was never a problem.  But at work I cycled the glow plugs twice, turned the key to start, it cranked slowly, started firing a random cylinder, then two,  and was kinda running on 4-5 cylinders making some terrible noises as it finally started firing on the last of the 8 cylinders. I had the case of 10W-30 Rotella at home and I did the oil change soon as I got home.  I put new glow plugs in around 200,000 miles,  had 4 that weren't working at all.  When I boxed up the PSD parts when I gave the truck to SON, I found 4 new glow plug relays in various places in the cab. Plus I made a jumper wire to bypass the relay if it ever didn't want to start.  When the factory GPR stopped working I filled the parking lot at work with gray fuel laden smoke,  guy I didn't even know came over and asked if I needed a jump,  it cranked fine,  just wasn't heating the glow plugs.  I went back inside, called the heavy truck service manager at my dealer, he told me how to short the GP relay, did that for 30 seconds, then jumped in the cab and it started right up. 

When I drove semi It didn't have a block heater,  really cold nites it idled all night. The '79 White RoadBoss had air start, cranked faster for better starts but air supply only lasted 4-5 seconds.  No glow plugs so most mornings it got a sniff of ether and would pop right off. If it didn't it took a L-O-N-G time to sniff up the air tank for the starter,  did that a couple times,  think my compressor only made 2-3 CFM.  The S2200 IH had a 290 Cummins, it started better than the 903.  But with the winter fuel, cold tires, wheel bearings, head winds, 50 mph was my new cruising speed. State Trooper passed me one morning, I'm doing about 52, I see him reach for his CB mic,  he gives me a "Green Light" for the next 60 miles, "Put your Foot in it! Let's GO!"  I thanked him and said, I'm pedalling as fast as I can,  go ahead and scare all the BIG trucks going west bound".

Oh, one more thing, couple times I left my 7.3L sit outside idling while I cleaned the driveway. It would "WetStack" something terrible even with the radiator completely covered with the winter front.  No load low rpm, your not burning any fuel, maybe a gallon per hour, and it would spit raw fuel out the tailpipe. Jump back in it to put away and it would struggle to clean itself out and run right.  The 903 would wet stack too,  the gray/white smoke would just roll out the stack. I had a cardboard slip sheet that fit between the grill and radiator, block ALL the cold air off but still barely warm the engine.

I take winter kinda serious, I've had a block heater on every car/truck I've owned since 1973.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me it depends on how you use it over the winter, hauling/working I’d use 15w40, like a car I’d use 10w30

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Case IH makes 10 /30 Number 1 Diesel oil , I run that in my Cummins for winter . My Cat D6 has and electronic motor and I have to run there 10/30 in that all year round , they have God oil too .

Danny 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My previous employer had several 6.5’s, they all clatter like they are going to self destruct when cold and not plugged in. The boss would get in his 6.5 Suburban on a 10 degree morning and start cranking away. You would think it was going to fly apart, made no difference what oil was in it.once warmed up everything was normal.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TomH said:

My previous employer had several 6.5’s, they all clatter like they are going to self destruct when cold and not plugged in. The boss would get in his 6.5 Suburban on a 10 degree morning and start cranking away. You would think it was going to fly apart, made no difference what oil was in it.once warmed up everything was normal.

They tell me straight 30 cures that on some engines?????

Sorry, I could not resist!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also order a silicon pad that you glue to your oil pan, makes the oil a bit thinner for start up.   Common practice here to run a coolant heater, and pads on oil pan, tranny pan, and maybe a specialized one under the batteries. Makes a big difference.

 

 

and just an FYI, they did some big studies and spent a lot of time but learned that after 2 hours your vehicle is as warm as a plug in will get it

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does clatter pretty bad in any case, and t starts just fine with just glow plugs, too much cranking is hard on the starter bolts so i do all I can to avoid that 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, AKwelder said:

You can also order a silicon pad that you glue to your oil pan, makes the oil a bit thinner for start up.   Common practice here to run a coolant heater, and pads on oil pan, tranny pan, and maybe a specialized one under the batteries. Makes a big difference.

 

 

and just an FYI, they did some big studies and spent a lot of time but learned that after 2 hours your vehicle is as warm as a plug in will get it

I have timers, thing is is if I get a fire call in the middle of the night I don’t like giving a cold diesel a hot supper, it’s up hill from my house for about 3 miles so I try to just leave it plugged in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, vtfireman85 said:

I have timers, thing is is if I get a fire call in the middle of the night I don’t like giving a cold diesel a hot supper, it’s up hill from my house for about 3 miles so I try to just leave it plugged in. 

I can understand that, and I have done it myself.  You can look up those heater pads on Amazon and they will help the oil on start up, although I am not convinced the oil is what’s causing your start up surging. 

 

You can can also use a space heater for 15 minutes to take the chill off and warm things up.  We have a small duct that routes the hot air under the engine.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I have timers, thing is is if I get a fire call in the middle of the night I don’t like giving a cold diesel a hot supper, it’s up hill from my house for about 3 miles so I try to just leave it plugged in. 

You need a heated garage.   Or even just a garage.  Just getting out of the wind will help, plus you should not have to clean off your windshield.   Although that could lead to less warm up time for the engine.

How am I doing for spending your money so far?   If you would like me to create a truly complex solution to your quandary I could start working on the logistics of a tunnel system to your fire hall.  Willie is going to hide the checkbook from you if he gets wind of this..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

They tell me straight 30 cures that on some engines?????

Ha! But it has to be IH or it doesn't work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, 1586 Jeff said:

You need a heated garage.   Or even just a garage.  Just getting out of the wind will help, plus you should not have to clean off your windshield.   Although that could lead to less warm up time for the engine.

How am I doing for spending your money so far?   If you would like me to create a truly complex solution to your quandary I could start working on the logistics of a tunnel system to your fire hall.  Willie is going to hide the checkbook from you if he gets wind of this..........

Heated garage is the cats hind end for preheating vehicles, and getting in and out in snowstorms, windstorm, rain, heat, cold and any other weather conditions. The down side of a heated garage is the sweet old ladies at church who ask where is your child's coat...

Or put it on a timer that runs say 15 minutes every hour...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mader656 said:

Or put it on a timer that runs say 15 minutes every hour...

What I did for my tow trucks was to install smaller block heaters (1000 watt) so that they would draw less and utilize a thermostat that I would place under the hood, on top of the engine.  That way on a warm/sunny day (sunshine puts out roughly 1500 BTUs per square foot per hour on a good day) the block heater was not running, but it was still plugged in when it needed to be.  I have never had a truck not start with that system.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My truck will start at 10* not being plugged up but I keep it plugged up at 45* and below. On a job in eastern KY in the early 2000's weather averaged 10* for 2 weeks. Truck was never shut off. Used a stick between the dash and throttle petal to keep it at 11-1200rpms. Many times when working in the 30* temperature I would run a cord from the welder to the truck after lunch so I would have a heater quicker.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...