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superman

C152 H

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I took my farmall H engine to the shop for a complete rebuild, I'm going stock with gas. The I-H parts manual list three engine head types, gas, kerosene, distillate, parts numbers not casting numbers?? not wanting to rebuild the C152 H engine any other way but only for gas, I did some research??

casting numbers                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          8043db gas                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  8043dc gas with flat top pistons                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              8776 distillate                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              6186 kerosene

Prior to the letter series farmall the standard fuel was kerosene with and engine compression ratio of 4.4 to 1, distillate 4.5 to 1, gas 5.7 to 1                                                                                                                start on gas                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  hotter manifold                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            low compression lower power                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  when every dollar counts

Question; with the low compression engine for distillate fuels, would the head chamber be larger to let more fuel in.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

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Yes the  chamber is larger;

I'm thinking heavy low flash point fuel being heated by manifold entering chamber, compression stroke coming up you don't want the fuel to diesel or engine nock, you want the fuel to fire on top. So bigger chamber more fuel low compression just made the engine more stable.

In 1967 I operated a John Deer B all fuel, fling wheel start only, start on gas, swing to diesel, as well on kerosene.  I harrowed the back field  one summer for a hayfield. 

note: Distillate fuel, distilled from crude petroleum

two pet cocks in the oil pan, you opened the top to drain off accumulation of fuel, distillate would go past the rings and into the oil pan. no good.

 

 

       

 

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Have been told by a local friend they had a Farmall H distillate that was the same way. Oil level checked by opening bottom pet ****, at end of work day open top one to drain off distillate fuel. Seems like a lot  of oil contamination to me. Have never seen anything in IH manuals about this being normal or draining fuel from oil at end of the day. My manuals just states, fill with oil till runs out of bottom pet **** if burning distillate. Fill  oil to top pet **** if burning gas. Had thought draining distillate from oil must be a sign of worn rings. If I'm wrong, let me know. I have a 1940 distillate H. When I dropped the oil pan, way too much sludge buildup in engine to have been circulating any kerosene like fuel through it.   

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15 hours ago, oldfarmkid said:

Have been told by a local friend they had a Farmall H distillate that was the same way. Oil level checked by opening bottom pet ****, at end of work day open top one to drain off distillate fuel. Seems like a lot  of oil contamination to me. Have never seen anything in IH manuals about this being normal or draining fuel from oil at end of the day. My manuals just states, fill with oil till runs out of bottom pet **** if burning distillate. Fill  oil to top pet **** if burning gas. Had thought draining distillate from oil must be a sign of worn rings. If I'm wrong, let me know. I have a 1940 distillate H. When I dropped the oil pan, way too much sludge buildup in engine to have been circulating any kerosene like fuel through it.   

The product filling the oil pan was a lot more like diesel slobber than fuel. Oil change intervals were shorter for distillate fuels

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Very good, have never seen, smelled, used distillate fuel. Diesel slobber gives me the first description of what it was like. Do you know if it was designed practice to have it run past the piston rings into the crankcase, then drain fuel from crankcase at end of day? Good thing we're not airplane pilots, there would no longer be a place to sit. My above post changed crankcase drains to, pet ****. Guess these days the pilot sits and controls the plane from the ****pit. If we meet face to face do we need to talk the same way?    

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1 hour ago, oldfarmkid said:

Very good, have never seen, smelled, used distillate fuel. Diesel slobber gives me the first description of what it was like. Do you know if it was designed practice to have it run past the piston rings into the crankcase, then drain fuel from crankcase at end of day? Good thing we're not airplane pilots, there would no longer be a place to sit. My above post changed crankcase drains to, pet ****. Guess these days the pilot sits and controls the plane from the ****pit. If we meet face to face do we need to talk the same way?    

Distillate is very much like #1 fuel oil. The product that enters crankcase is partially burned like diesel slobber. I have been trying to upload page from 10-20 manual. I was wrong about oil change intervals. They are the same gas or distillate. 60 hr. Instructions are to drain to lower valve. Then refill to upper with new oil. Every 10 hr for distillate. Every 30 hr for gas.

The crankcase dilution is not much different than what is encountered with a cold running diesel.

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Guess I didn't expect it getting past the rings so bad with only around 90 psi. Thinking I could see it happening in a diesel that has much more compression. Would be great to see info from your 10-20 manual. Sorry, not much help in upload issues. Please forgive me for asking questions on your post Superman. Found once I read distillate info, which is hard to find, I just invited myself.

Take Care

Tim

 

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Oldfarmkid;

That's ok ask questions, distillate info is long gone. I started this post with the hopes of some fuel wizard telling me why the bigger chamber lower compression was used for distillate fuel?? Your 1940 distillate H with sludge build up, lube oils started with straight weight none detergent  oils that would build up in a engine.

My 1942 Farmall H owner's manual,  gives three start up and run for distillate, Kerosene, gasoline engines info.

My 1940 Farmall M Instruction manual, say's distillate or kerosene if not kept hot,  fuel will not be properly vaporized and dilution of crankcase lubricating will result.

back to my question; would the head chamber be larger to let more fuel in?? I'm saying yes, to have more volume of vaporized fuel to run.

gives a little more thought to the two test cocks on the oil pan, ?? not just there to check oil level.

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1 hour ago, superman said:

back to my question; would the head chamber be larger to let more fuel in?? I'm saying yes, to have more volume of vaporized fuel to run.

No the chamber was larger to lower compression so it would not knock. Think octane.

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