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IH Blood 1206

Unloading auger on combine

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Ok, we tend to leave the auger out when combining.  Always have.  Guys think we are nuts.  You guys leave the spout out or put it back each time?  Just a fun topic...

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If I was dumping on the go left it out otherwise in. As long as they are now on these big machines I’d be nervous leaving it out.

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Once you end up buying a replacement auger an finish paying off the utility co. for the power pole you destroyed you will start putting it away when your'e done with it. ☺️

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Just now, IH Blood 1206 said:

Ok, we tend to leave the auger out when combining.  Always have.  Guys think we are nuts.  You guys leave the spout out or put it back each time?  Just a fun topic...

In, too many trees on the edge of fields when turning on headlands. As long as some of these augers are you would have to have a wide headland so you don't wack the trees on the edge. We're slowly weeding the trees out in the fencerows but we have a long way to go on our owned ground. Some of our rented ground the trees are off limits.

 

1 minute ago, jass1660 said:

If I was dumping on the go left it out otherwise in. As long as they are now on these big machines I’d be nervous leaving it out.

I was thinking the same thing with all these ultra long augers now.

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8 minutes ago, CIHTECH said:

Once you end up buying a replacement auger an finish paying off the utility co. for the power pole you destroyed you will start putting it away when your'e done with it. ☺️

When I was dumping on the go and went in circles per say turning with the auger to the inside.

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Years ago we had a John Deere 4400 and it always got left out once you're in the field and dumped the first time because until you had it completely empty you would lose some where hinged together. Just like the step that folded down it was something you always thought about depending what you were doing

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I will, and have never left the unloading auger extended unless I am emptying the hopper. Its just so easy to fold back in with a lever, why would I take the chance of hitting a tree or a building? On the old machines with manual folding naturally I'd leave the auger out once I'd done the outside round. There is the reason we always cut the outside of the field or around bushes with the auger towards the inside of the field. Even to this day I"ll still glance back over my left shoulder occasionally when driving around a bush. Just in case! 

Also, does it not put extra strain on the 90 degree joint of the auger to have the auger hanging out, not resting in it's cradle? Referring to my 1660 anyway. 

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In. I installed a light that comes on when it is out to remind the hired help to put it back after dumping. Helps the boss to remember also!!

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Trees, power lines and hills dictate I leave mine folded in except when unloading.  You must be on some level, treeless farmland to leave it out!

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If it's hydraulic swing it is certainly easy enough to put back. I never had one hydraulic swing yet. JD 4400 and now an IH 205 are both manually folding type

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Its different if its an old machine with a manual fold and latch..............On the new ones I can't see any reason to leave it out.

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To easy to push a button to not fold it in. Always gets folded in

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As old school as we are on this farm sometimes we haven't had a manual fold unload auger since Dad got rid of the IH 715 we had when i was a young kid in 1990.

 

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I always fold it in. There’s a fair bit of strain on it when it’s out and not supported. Especially on a rough field.  I’m a little nervous getting a new combine too as I’ll have to make a mental not every time I turn on headlands to wat h out for the auger as they stick out even further out the back. 

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6 minutes ago, Reichow7120 said:

As old school as we are on this farm sometimes we haven't had a manual fold unload auger since Dad got rid of the IH 715 we had when i was a young kid in 1990.

 

Same here. I've had hydraulic swing unloading auger since 1980 on the Massey 510. Short little auger but I still managed to damage it once. Pulled up to the bins to unload into the truck box and then we forgot and raised the truck box to unload. It dented the pipe a little and broke the drive chain before I realized what was happening. Incidents like that make me a little careful about the unload augers and where they ride. 

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Combine is much safer than the chopper I would guess as it doesn't go near as high as the spout does. I have to really watch around power lines

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I can see leaving out with high bushel corn and big heads where you might be unloading every 5 minutes.

But it takes me forever to fill a hopper in 30 bushel beans, and we have tons of trees, I always fold in.

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14 minutes ago, bitty said:

Combine is much safer than the chopper I would guess as it doesn't go near as high as the spout does. I have to really watch around power lines

I can't even count the times I had to fix the spout on the 7400 Deere they had at the farm. I even had to replace the worm gear on the drive motor due to the teeth getting sheared off a couple times. My boss liked to keep it as close to the truck as possible to lessen the chances of missing the truck. He would send the full truck off and the back gate, which is slightly higher than the sides, would catch the spout and BOOM!. Towards the end of its life at the farm it had a permanent gradual twist to it, made opening corn fields extra fun. Bosses son left the field late one night and didn't put the spout in the storage position, that was a late night for me.

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mine is always in.  one less thing to worry about.

fwiw

Duane

 

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We've always left the auger in since the MF 510 days.  There is a reason they make it easy to fold the auger in now days.  These augers today are 26ft to 28ft long and leaving them out there isn't good for them imo.  Besides hitting trees/poles, when you are using two or more combines and get down towards the very end, the augers from both combines could hit each other if the operators aren't paying attention.  Its happened. 

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My uncle came at me once in the grain cart from the front. My combine auger out, his grain cart auger out. It was at night.  He was going to turn around and come up to me from the back.  I flashed my lights.  Nothing.  Finally I started to fold the combine auger in and slowed down.  He stopped the cart and he was beside himself for a while for forgetting the auger on the cart. It happens that quick.

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8 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

We've always left the auger in since the MF 510 days.  There is a reason they make it easy to fold the auger in now days.  These augers today are 26ft to 28ft long and leaving them out there isn't good for them imo.  Besides hitting trees/poles, when you are using two or more combines and get down towards the very end, the augers from both combines could hit each other if the operators aren't paying attention.  Its happened. 

Its true. Heard of and saw pictures of what happens when two long combine augers hit each other. Took some heavy equipment in the field to do the repair job plus a lot of expense and lost time. Augers in!

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