Jump to content
KWRB

Singular Form of Cattle

Recommended Posts

So apparently there's no singular form of the word cattle. To be specific, there is no non-gender-specific term.

So I ask the experts, if you see a singular member of the species and cannot tell the gender, what do you call it? Put another way, finish this sentence: "The picture below is a highland ____."

image.thumb.png.7f684ad0dc278b193488a7385a5048cf.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bovine

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well.... don't know of an english word/name for a single member of a cattle herd. Bull, Cow, Heifer, Steer. One thing for sure, can't tell by looking at the face.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heifer is the name given to a female that has not given birth to a calf, and has never produced milk.

Cow is the name given to a female that has given birth to a calf and has produced milk.

Steer is the name of a male that has been castrated.

Bull is a male that has not been castrated.

A herd can consist of all heifers, all cows, all steers, all bulls, or a combination of all four groups of all ages.

These definitions were accurate during my younger years growing up in Nebraska. And as taught by my Father and Grandfather in the early 1960's. Matched what was taught in FFA in high school.  Thought I'd give a time frame given our current state as who and what constitutes which. Have noticed alot of confusion over this issue since most knowledge comes from city folk now. Which I now am by the way.    

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like oldfarmkid says you cannot tell the gender from it face but maybe you need more clarification on cattle

 I sold some fence to some citiots and the kids wanted to go into the field to look at the cows, I told them no because theres a bull in there. One of them asked which one? I said the one with a white face. He says but he doesn't have horns, I thought bull had horns 😑. OP horns don't mean its a bull if that's what you were getting at

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same scenerio with "deer"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, oldfarmkid said:

Heifer is the name given to a female that has not given birth to a calf, and has never produced milk.

Cow is the name given to a female that has given birth to a calf and has produced milk.

Steer is the name of a male that has been castrated.

Bull is a male that has not been castrated.

A herd can consist of all heifers, all cows, all steers, all bulls, or a combination of all four groups of all ages.

These definitions were accurate during my younger years growing up in Nebraska. And as taught by my Father and Grandfather in the early 1960's. Matched what was taught in FFA in high school.  Thought I'd give a time frame given our current state as who and what constitutes which. Have noticed alot of confusion over this issue since most knowledge comes from city folk now. Which I now am by the way.    

I know I`m a steer and I think oldtanker is also...

  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well hillman you hit the nail on the head. Many years ago I knew a young man in his twenties that corrected me when I pointed out a bull placed in a pasture with cows. His correction was biased on Bulls have curly hair on their foreheads. The animal I pointed out did not have curls. Too bad he went home before milking time, it could have been fun. He was older than me at the time and I was too shy to give a class on cattle genitalia.

   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cattle can only be used in the plural and not in the singular: it is a plurale tantum. Thus one may refer to "three cattle" or "some cattle", but not "one cattle". No universally used singular form in modern English of "cattle" exists, other than the sex- and age-specific terms such as cow, bull, steer and heifer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, MTO said:

Same scenerio with "deer"

I`m wrong. Deer is both singular and plural. Sorry.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, MTO said:

I know I`m a steer and I think oldtanker is also...

I am confused you guys are fill of steer$hit?😏

  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, hillman said:

I confused you guys are fill of steer$hit?😏

Well, uh... uh... he is!

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The singular form of cattle is “T-Bone” in my book. It can come from any of the bovines and normally one takes care of hunger

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's Plurale Tantum...& I don't remember the Latin translation. Oh, Mark copied from google...

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Rainman said:

It's Plurale Tantum...& I don't remember the Latin translation. Oh, Mark copied from google...

Well you SURELY don`t think I wrote that myself!!:ph34r:

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, MTO said:

Well you SURELY don`t think I wrote that myself!!:ph34r:

Why not, I studied Latin for 4 years in the sem...

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have worked cattle most my life.  I dated a rich cattlmans daughter once upon a time. When I referred to them as cows I was promptly corrected that "they're cattle not cows!"

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, KWRB said:

So apparently there's no singular form of the word cattle. To be specific, there is no non-gender-specific term.

So I ask the experts, if you see a singular member of the species and cannot tell the gender, what do you call it? Put another way, finish this sentence: "The picture below is a highland ____."

image.thumb.png.7f684ad0dc278b193488a7385a5048cf.png

Yearling Scottish Highlander bull. Dunno for sure, too much "har". Wide between the eyes. Looks like a bull

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well.... once again, given the picture, and the question. Not enough picture to answer the question. A bit like showing the picture of an alternator and asking, what kind of car is this.

Need more parts in the picture, to answer the question. No expert, thats a dangerous title. Just my layman's thoughts.      

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this world of radical free thinking, aren’t you supposed to ask the “cattle” how it as a single or collective would like to referred?  😇

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The picture below is a highland ____."

[insert Bovidae]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...