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yellowrosefarm

Best frame coating for trucks?

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I've heard you guys in the salt belt talk about  different stuff to put on a truck frame but can't remember or find anything specific. I'm getting another truck and would like to coat the frame before winter.  What is your favorite elixir?

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I usually do it once a year, but I probably drive on some of the most salt / chloride covered roads. It sprays on pretty easy and doesn't drip, it also creeps during the warm weather. It's come up about 3" on the inside of my bed through the seams.

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4 hours ago, yellowrosefarm said:

I've heard you guys in the salt belt talk about  different stuff to put on a truck frame but can't remember or find anything specific. I'm getting another truck and would like to coat the frame before winter.  What is your favorite elixir?

new, used? im pretty sold on the NH Undercoating, thats a brand name, you can order it online, it requires an application gun, also sold online, its soy based, and works and clings really well, it creeps and flows, its relatively inexpensive and its available tinted black. also doesn't stink like fluid film, doesn't drool like drain oil and its designed for just one purpose, undercoating vehicles. 

I would like to do it a couple-3 times a year, but I never get to it. 

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2002 Chevy 2500. Has some light surface rust but no pitting. It was the best one I could find in 2 months of looking. I'll pull the bed and rotary nozzle pressure spray, then coat with something.

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15 minutes ago, yellowrosefarm said:

2002 Chevy 2500. Has some light surface rust but no pitting. It was the best one I could find in 2 months of looking. I'll pull the bed and rotary nozzle pressure spray, then coat with something.

My friend sears by boiled linseed oil and a little bit of black paint for color, coats and sticks, never quite fully hardens like paint and plays really well with undercoatings. 

It does look nice, I’ve been meaning to do some test pieces with different coatings but haven’t had time for such activities 

i would try that in addition to the NH undercoating if it were me. 

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I've heard a number of people in my area raving about POR-15.  The work I saw with POR-15 looked really good.  It leaves a super hard finish.  https://www.por15.com 

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I’m not sold on any hard shell product you are supposed to put over rust. Seems to me like pooping on your sandwich keep the flies off. 

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5 hours ago, yellowrosefarm said:

2002 Chevy 2500. Has some light surface rust but no pitting. It was the best one I could find in 2 months of looking. I'll pull the bed and rotary nozzle pressure spray, then coat with something.

You probably won't like this, but rust-proofing an 18 year old truck borders on being a waste of time and effort.  And depending on what you coat with may trap salt next to the sheetmetal or frame where it can rust worse.

I had my '96 F-250 rust-proofed with Auto -Armor the day After it got off the transport at the dealer. Even called the Auto Armor manager and he Inspected it personally. That truck was my daily driver for 9 years, Nine Wisconsin winters commuting 30 to 75 miles each way to/from work,  then was my bad winter road vehicle for another 5 years.  I've had things like a power steering line, two steel fuel lines,  and ALL the brake lines replaced due to rust.  The rear spring packs are rusted solid I think the way it rides. And the front springs are sagged down to the bump stops,  patches of rust on the frame,  but there's one little area on the right rear wheel well about 2-2-1/2" long that the paint is bubbling where most OBS Ford's have big rust homes. Some rust on the back of the door jambs where it's spot welded, and the pinch welds on the bottoms of the doors and tailgate have some bubbling paint.  But the truck is 23-1/4 years old,  June 27th, '96 I picked it up.  ALL the stuff I replaced was not coated with Auto-Armor.  Two types of stuff they spray,  a soft non-hardening rubbery  black putty substance for places like frames, wheel wells,  suspension arms, cab & box mounts,  it never gets hard,  and a thinner gold colored material sprayed on non-visible painted body surfaces like underside of the cab, box,  firewalls under the hood.  

I did not get Auto Armor on my '18 Ram 1500,  and I'll probably regret that.  Place that I bought my bedliner and side steps rust-proofs with Auto-Armor so it's still available.

When I ordered my '96 F-250 I saw lots of brand new trucks on dealer's lots with a surprising amount of rust on the frame and suspension. Ordered it in March, delivered end of June, '96.  My Ram was built in Sept., '17, and I bought it Mid January '18.

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39 minutes ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

You probably won't like this, but rust-proofing an 18 year old truck borders on being a waste of time and effort.  And depending on what you coat with may trap salt next to the sheetmetal or frame where it can rust worse.

I had my '96 F-250 rust-proofed with Auto -Armor the day After it got off the transport at the dealer. Even called the Auto Armor manager and he Inspected it personally. That truck was my daily driver for 9 years, Nine Wisconsin winters commuting 30 to 75 miles each way to/from work,  then was my bad winter road vehicle for another 5 years.  I've had things like a power steering line, two steel fuel lines,  and ALL the brake lines replaced due to rust.  The rear spring packs are rusted solid I think the way it rides. And the front springs are sagged down to the bump stops,  patches of rust on the frame,  but there's one little area on the right rear wheel well about 2-2-1/2" long that the paint is bubbling where most OBS Ford's have big rust homes. Some rust on the back of the door jambs where it's spot welded, and the pinch welds on the bottoms of the doors and tailgate have some bubbling paint.  But the truck is 23-1/4 years old,  June 27th, '96 I picked it up.  ALL the stuff I replaced was not coated with Auto-Armor.  Two types of stuff they spray,  a soft non-hardening rubbery  black putty substance for places like frames, wheel wells,  suspension arms, cab & box mounts,  it never gets hard,  and a thinner gold colored material sprayed on non-visible painted body surfaces like underside of the cab, box,  firewalls under the hood.  

I did not get Auto Armor on my '18 Ram 1500,  and I'll probably regret that.  Place that I bought my bedliner and side steps rust-proofs with Auto-Armor so it's still available.

When I ordered my '96 F-250 I saw lots of brand new trucks on dealer's lots with a surprising amount of rust on the frame and suspension. Ordered it in March, delivered end of June, '96.  My Ram was built in Sept., '17, and I bought it Mid January '18.

Keep in mind he’s in Virginia Dr.E, it’s unlikely what he is calling rust is what you or I would call rust. My Saab is from northern Virginia and it’s faded but as clean underneath as any new car in any lot. Virtually no salt and very few dirt roads.   

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I found the best rust proofing I did was move to Florida...

 

 

I used fluid film in Indiana, never a spot of rust anywhere, oddly enough I never coated the backside of the fuel cap door and it looked horrible but never rusted through.

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17 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

Keep in mind he’s in Virginia Dr.E, it’s unlikely what he is calling rust is what you or I would call rust. My Saab is from northern Virginia and it’s faded but as clean underneath as any new car in any lot. Virtually no salt and very few dirt roads.   

Not exactly right. That's why it took 3 months and several thousand miles of travel to find this mostly rust free truck. Most of the GM trucks of this age here have no rocker panels left and most all models have rust starting in all body seams. Not salt like PA but we have our fair share. And, still plenty of dirt roads too, though someone passing through would be unlikely to see them. And, for Dr. E, in 40 years of owning vehicles I have never had a new one. I'm glad people do buy them, so there are used ones for the rest of us. 

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Used motor oil sprayed through a garden sprayer. Get it in all the cracks and crevices. I know a guy here that owns a 71 chevy pickup that has survived Michigan since new by oiling it at least once a year.

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47 minutes ago, rrr4quality said:

Used motor oil sprayed through a garden sprayer. Get it in all the cracks and crevices. I know a guy here that owns a 71 chevy pickup that has survived Michigan since new by oiling it at least once a year.

My dad was on a quest to find the best product and he swore by oil.........had to let his vehicles sit in the yard for a week every year so the extra oil would drip off.  

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Hydraulic fluid shouldn't eat at the rubber either right? Motor oil does. I use to use oil but it would eat (crack) the shock bushings, sway bar bushings, spring eye bushings after just a few years.  Buddy had the fuel pump pop loose in his chevy after oil ate the mounting gasket.  I have used every product mentioned in this thread, on new trucks, in NY, and I've decided that nothing works all that great, but if you re-apply anything 2-3x a winter, that it all works well. 

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It shouldn't hurt rubber.  I found out it lasts longer in the weather than other oils when I leaked some on the tube that holds the loading ramps on my trailer.  It made them so easy to use and lasted much longer than I thought possible outside!

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I ended up using Eastwoods rust encapsulator followed with a top coat of Rustoleum semi gloss black. We will see how it holds up.

truck bed 003.JPG

truck bed 002.JPG

2002 Silverado truck frame 001.JPG

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Cosmoline would probably be the best coating you could ever apply if you can stand the smell

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Fluid film. Once a year. There's places here setting up to apply it.

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