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Mike56073

Grain bin accidents

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    There have been 3 grain bin accidents in my area within the last month, 2 of them fatal.   Why on earth are people not paying attention to saftey when they climb into one ??

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1) "Nobody has time for safety stuff."

2) "I've done it like this all the time and never had a problem."

Both totally invalid excuses when the end result is the Fire Dept trying to dig you out of the bin or when someone is digging a hole to put you in.

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I remember as a kid a local kid died in a grain bin. We didn't have bins at the time but it has always been on my mind when near a bin 

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Stubbornness, frustration, stress. 

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"never had a problem before"   "don't need a safety rope, this will only take a minute"

Not highjacking.... but add PTO's to this list as well. (I've see the result of what happens when someone gets hung up in a PTO shaft). At least in a grain bin you don't have to walk around picking up pieces.  Just imagine an on farm IED.  Nuff said.

Reminds me of a T-shirt I saw years ago..... "It's not that life is short,.....dead is really long"

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Had a member of Iowa Chapter 5 suffocate in a grain bin this spring. Happens way too quickly. 

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Tell me why anyone gets inside one to begin with.

Aren`t they filled by an external auger?

Why the need to get inside when filling?

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1 minute ago, MTO said:

Tell me why anyone gets inside one to begin with.

Aren`t they filled by an external auger?

Why the need to get inside when filling?

It’s when you are cleaning it out that suffocation’s happen.

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6 minutes ago, jass1660 said:

It’s when you are cleaning it out that suffocation’s happen.

OK, then again, why are they getting inside?

Clogged auger?

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Grain crusts over and clumps can plug sump for auger, they have flat floors with an open auger that goes around and moves grain to center and this spring neighbors hired man got tangled up in a sweep and lost leg up to his knee.

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13 minutes ago, MTO said:

Tell me why anyone gets inside one to begin with.

Aren`t they filled by an external auger?

Why the need to get inside when filling?

When they got near full Dad sent me in to level the cone of corn to gain more storage volume.

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1 hour ago, Mike56073 said:

    There have been 3 grain bin accidents in my area within the last month, 2 of them fatal.   Why on earth are people not paying attention to saftey when they climb into one ??

 

12 minutes ago, jass1660 said:

Grain crusts over and clumps can plug sump for auger, they have flat floors with an open auger that goes around and moves grain to center and this spring neighbors hired man got tangled up in a sweep and lost leg up to his knee.

That's what happened to one of the guys mentioned, caught up in the sweep auger.

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I am often in grain bins cleaning out the last bit an auger or sweep can't get..... and I was asking myself what triggers these accidents?... and how can we all learn from it?

Thanks  jass1660 for the lesson

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1 hour ago, jass1660 said:

 

I've been in many bins, used to repair/service all kinds of things. Broken stirrator augers were fun as I remember. I had this young fellow for summer help once, we had to go inside a bin that was about 3/4 full of beans. Got the hatch open and before I knew it he just jumped right in. Fortunately there was no bridge or he would have been just like the picture above.  We used to have training on proper procedures every 6 months (with that same video as well as others) on what not to do and how to rescue someone trapped which thank the Lord I never had to do.

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I have no problems jumping in my drying bin to check the moisture, but I absolutely will not go in when the unload is on.   I just don’t understand why someone would go in when the unload is on, crust or no crust.

      A sweep accident I kind of understand how that could happen, most of the time you have to be in behind the sweep shoveling, but you need to pay attention when it’s getting towards the end.  It’s like any other piece of equipment, treat it with respect.

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A man not to far from where I live was killed in a grain bin this past spring. It was a crusting issue that he went in to clear out. He had a harness on but the rope he was tied to failed when the grain unexpectedly all cut loose at once and the grain enveloped him, suffocating him.

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Don't forget mold and spores. I got the bright idea to clean out a temporarily empty feed holding bin. I got it clean all right. I also spent the next four days in bed with fever,chills,sweats and a few other things. Didn't realize untill later how close to dead I got.

And don't even get me started on raggedy a$$ed "barn clothes".

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1 hour ago, exSW said:

Don't forget mold and spores. I got the bright idea to clean out a temporarily empty feed holding bin. I got it clean all right. I also spent the next four days in bed with fever,chills,sweats and a few other things. Didn't realize untill later how close to dead I got.

And don't even get me started on raggedy a$$ed "barn clothes".

Farmers lung, been there done that, and now i can't walk to the mail box and back without huffing. Young and dumb, stupid plain stupid.

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The bins on the farms around here up until recent times were not very large by today's standards, and with small batch driers and oversized fans/perforated floors in the bins themselves and overkill on the roof vents, I never encountered any issues in any of the bins I have been in, in this area.......are issues like this more common using other methods to reduce grain moisture?   Grain always flowed well, and the small sweeps weren't put in until the grain was well out, and even then you didn't have to do much other than push the sweep along every so often.  

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A sad thing a couple years ago here in North Dakota. A young 30 something farmer was loading corn out of a big bin. It was stuck up on back and sides. He had door open poking it from outside or something and it came down. Burying him outside the bin. They said it was 6 semi loads that covered him up outside the bin.

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2 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

The bins on the farms around here up until recent times were not very large by today's standards, and with small batch driers and oversized fans/perforated floors in the bins themselves and overkill on the roof vents, I never encountered any issues in any of the bins I have been in, in this area.......are issues like this more common using other methods to reduce grain moisture?   Grain always flowed well, and the small sweeps weren't put in until the grain was well out, and even then you didn't have to do much other than push the sweep along every so often.  

I think these problems are much more common in today's larger bins. No stirators and permanently installed power sweeps. The stirators would prevent crusting and the power sweeps could be on under the grain I suppose. 

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Many years ago early 70's, worked at the local CO OP after school. One of the first jobs they gave me was to take corn samples from each of the full bins to check on moisture level, mold, etc. Would tie a rope around my waist that was held by one of the older guys. Open the top door, crawl to the top center of the bin, push my arm down into the corn up to my elbow, grab a fist full of corn, place it in the sample bag. Three samples for each bin. Then crawl out, job well done. They were proud of the largest new bins four each, memory thinks they were 50,000 bushels each, about 50 feet tall. Found out a week later one of the large bins I had taken a sample from had been emptied a couple weeks previous to my sample collecting.  They did a check and found that indeed the bin was empty except for a crust about 4 feet thick at the very top of the bin. Still gives me a bit of a shutter at the thought of having about 46 feet of open air beneath me as I was dutifully  ( doing my job) . At the time thought, well at least I'm making good money $2.25 hr.

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6 hours ago, oldfarmkid said:

Many years ago early 70's, worked at the local CO OP after school. One of the first jobs they gave me was to take corn samples from each of the full bins to check on moisture level, mold, etc. Would tie a rope around my waist that was held by one of the older guys. Open the top door, crawl to the top center of the bin, push my arm down into the corn up to my elbow, grab a fist full of corn, place it in the sample bag. Three samples for each bin. Then crawl out, job well done. They were proud of the largest new bins four each, memory thinks they were 50,000 bushels each, about 50 feet tall. Found out a week later one of the large bins I had taken a sample from had been emptied a couple weeks previous to my sample collecting.  They did a check and found that indeed the bin was empty except for a crust about 4 feet thick at the very top of the bin. Still gives me a bit of a shutter at the thought of having about 46 feet of open air beneath me as I was dutifully  ( doing my job) . At the time thought, well at least I'm making good money $2.25 hr.

I think I was making $3.35 when I had my first case of "farmers Lung"

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Was thinking about this post today while I was up top of a hopper bin trying to poke heated canola down to the bottom. No I didn’t enter the bin. I’m not sure what I was doing was much safer though lol. Perched on top with a 16’ 1x4 chipping away at it.  Finally gave up and started banging the bottom of the hopper with a 2x4 and it started to break loose. Have to get the bin cleaned out and agitate the canola so it doesn’t heat anymore.  

6CCD460A-DDA9-49F3-B0B0-337F4552D4D1.jpeg

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