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Ok, I’m not sure what to make of this Ferguson...


vtfireman85
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I’ve been driving by this lawn ornament fergie for years, finally stopped and got an eyeful, aluminum hood, aluminum oil pan , aluminum trans housing with 6 shifter positions and more levers than I can imagine what they do under the dash and something to the right of the steering wheel that I can only conclude is for reproduction. 

Anyone have any insight?

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Not that knowledgeable on the Fergusons to know about the aluminum hood, etc----but the shift pattern is:

1--4 forward

R-----reverse

S----starter engagement via shift lever

PTO lever is on left side under seat

Also------seems the early Fergusons had a tilt hood.  The pull handles under the hood might be hood release latches???

Looks to me to most likely be a TO-20 (??)------competed with the Ford 8N.  And then they had a TO-30 (slightly larger).

 

DD

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Check the tag above the steering wheel and the engine tag on the left side near the distributor. Should be able to tell if TE or TO. Smells of TO to me.

The two handles below the dash are the ejector seat releases. They MUST be pulled at exactly the same time in order to release the chute for landing.

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9 minutes ago, Bleedinred said:

Check the tag above the steering wheel and the engine tag on the left side near the distributor. Should be able to tell if TE or TO. Smells of TO to me.

The two handles below the dash are the ejector seat releases. They MUST be pulled at exactly the same time in order to release the chute for landing.

And I thought they were to release the anchor chains, brakes don’t work, gotta do something 

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1 hour ago, Delta Dirt said:

Also------seems the early Fergusons had a tilt hood.  The pull handles under the hood might be hood release latches???

If it is a TEA they are the releases but you don't pull them - they turn.  The bonnet (hood) pivots low down at the front and has a couple of slides along the fuel tank.  Never heard of an aluminium bonnet though.

Might have been early when (probably ex aircraft)  alloy seemed to be common in UK - like the Landrovers.  Story there on availability of rationed material was that steel was issued based on pre-WW2 exports of vehicles.  Rover hadn't been an exporter so didn't qualify for an issue for the Landrovers.  So early chassis plate was jigsaw welded up  from other peoples scrap piles.  Ain't central planning and socialism wonderful?

And the engine looks like a Standard by the LHS view

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8 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

Is all that aluminum stuff original to a Ferguson? I’ve never heard of it, and what’s with the shift pattern? 

The first couple years  Ferguson's and Ford's had aluminum hoods/grills. Oil pans were used a little longer. Most hood /grills  got broke and replaced with steel hoods/grills. A collector would love that tractor. Not sure about the transmission housing. Does it have an overdrive??? 

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Was thinking you could identify them by axle housing numbers on the back. Not sure why i am thinking this cuz it doesnt add up. All to 20's and 30's ive been around had tilt up hood. 35's had tilt up hood with another door to acess fuel tank on top. S is for start. None of ours ever had high low except massey 35. Pedals with long rods are brakes. Pto on the side. Not independant or overriding. Have to have pto engaged for 3 point to work.(pump running)  little guys would work circles around a 8n-9n. They had a continental engine. Massey 135 ran perkins in some. Pretty simple little rigs. Brakes are notorious to leak oil in drums and not work. Dad used to take them apart and torch the oil off them 2 times a year( tight wad)  Over the years i have been on and around 3 different to 30's, and a to 20. 

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Don't know much about Fergies except they were superior to the N series(not hard to do). I do know the very first 9N's in '39 had aluminum hoods. Like the first 300. I had a '39 9N and it had a steel hood. Dashboard/Steering column and gesr housing piece was aluminum however. But on the Fergie I'd say war surplus aluminum is a good guess.

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On 8/16/2019 at 1:17 PM, 696IH said:

Pretty sure those early fergys were mostly aluminium castings.

IIRC the transmission one might have magnesium in it.

I'd guess that all the TEA's (Standard engine) had alloy sumps.  I just checked  - our serial number is for 1954 and it has. (TE/TEA series started 1946, ended 1956)

More looking - it has the angled back oil filter on the LHS so another clue to a Standard engine.  By the carb it is a latish model, so likely TEA 20.

IIRC TO 20's had Continental engines

By way of oddities ours has a Lucas magneto.  Engine was identified by John (UK) (who used to post in the Ferguson section of YT) as coming from a hay baler.  It doesn't have a trip so starting needs a very OK battery.  You'd have to be pretty energetic on a crank handle.

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OK, The Ferguson came out in 1946. I hope it was superior to the 9 and 2 Ns. The 8N had the 4 speed transmission and the same HP as the 20. Had both position and draft control on the 3 point. So at the same HP, and both being rates as 2 bottom tractors both at 23 HP. I seriously doubt the 20 would outwork the 8N. But overall? Yea I believe the 20 was slightly superior just because it had the OHV engine. I've wondered for years why Ford stayed with the flat head, that was just dumb IMO. Both would leak oil on the brakes. New seals made with today's materials will fix both tractors.

Most of you guy don't like the N's cause they far outsold them ugly H's. Heck someone had to do it......?! And you don't like em cause today they hold value better than an H too ??!!

Yes the 9N originally had an aluminum hood. Highly sought after by collectors in case one of you guys find one. No, not me. They had cracking problems and as someone else said were replaced with steel. PTO setup is the lever under the seat behind where your left foot goes. 

Rick

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The dead giveaway its a england tractor is the aluminum steering box and transmission cover are one piece.  The TO tractors had two separate parts and didnt use aluminum for the trans/steering.  Originally if it was a true TE it would have came factory with a horn and rear licence plate brackets. The TE tractors would have had Lucas electronics instead if the TO's delco. Also the larger trans fill cap was closer to the gear stick. The ferguson 20 tractors had a safety starter switch. You would turn on you key and would put the gear stick into "S" to start. This was so you couldn't start the machine while in gear.

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TEA would not have come with the license plate brackets and horn, as I beleve in England they had to be registered and have "proper road equipment"  the A in TEA is for Tractor England Abroad and were ment for export use. I am not %100 for sure but thats my understandings. I have the factory horn,lucas starter,lucas distributor,and my fender has the proper mounts for the plate 46 TE 20. Hope that helps.  Another way ferguson was ahead of ford was with the continental Z-129 wet sleeve engine starting in 46. Fords and fergusons are very similar but are two different animals.  A mule is kinda like a donkey and a donkey is kinda like a mule. 

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I 'll put a bit of the limited information I know about TE20 tractors forward. As said earlier tractors had the alu. bonnets as we call them. They had alu. steering boxes right through production , also the oil pans I think.  Years ago they were everwhere over in the UK. 

But one thing I did notice is I think it started life as a petrol/TVO model , thats gasoline/kerosine to you. I bet the the tag starts with TED , TEA are straight petrol, TEF diesel and theres many more models as you go on.Wonder if it was a import in its lifetime otherwise it would be a TO20? I do see it has a bumper bar which although common in the US are never seen in England. Be good to read the tag on the tractor.

The give away is the intake grill on the dash and what will be a coolant temp gauge just by it. The petrol engine just had the air intake under the hood and no temp gauge. No idea why? If you could see the left side better at the fuel tap, you can just see the bowl, the TVO tractors had a real nice 2 way brass tap feeding from the main tank and starting tank under the hood.

Most of the tractors got the manifolds and carbs swapped out for straight gas later in life. 

Thats all I know, there is plenty of guys who live and breath these tractors out there somewhere!.

Alex.

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Oh just looking back at the pictures again, the tractor has foot boards. The English TE20's never had foot plates out of the factory, though many were fitted later in life. Though I read years ago the T020  did have foot plates?

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14 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

Question from our TEA 20 - "Who?"

Edelbrock is a company that makes aftermarket high performance automotive engine parts. All the stuff is usually aluminum, because it's lighter weight

It was said in jest. It's funny to me that tractor parts would be made out of aluminum, because aluminum is more expensive than steel/iron, and weight isn't usually a concern. In fact, it's usually desired...

Kinda begs the question, why were they aluminum in the first place?

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12 hours ago, Alex uk said:

The petrol engine just had the air intake under the hood and no temp gauge. No idea why?

If it's like the IH's, many gas models didn't come with a water temp gauge because gas-only models didn't have radiator shutters. On models that did have radiator shutters, the gauge was used to guide how far open or closed the shutters should be to maintain temp. So, if this is a non-gas model, and there was a mean of controlling the amount of cooling, then that would explain it.

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