Jump to content

Neighbor’s wheat harvest equipment...


SDman

Recommended Posts

Yesterday I went to help my daughter do some odds & ends jobs at her house. My old neighbor was combining his wheat with all the equipment shown here in the same field. They were able to combine a full section of 75-80 bpa winter wheat in pretty short order. We got about 3/4” of rain last night so it was all parked in a row this morning. I know most of its the wrong color but it’s still impressive to see. The other pictures show the equipment all out in the field last night shortly before sundown. 

784B005A-55FD-4730-97F3-07C7C54257C8.jpeg

A6D91EC1-BEEF-4F26-B03E-F98C4110952C.jpeg

BAE68D23-C57E-47EC-A6A5-CA87C688CFCB.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 or 12 combines. Doesn't seem like enough catch wagons. 

One day in Montana I pulled off onto the shoulder of the road and watched a similar harvest. Probably spent an hour just watching. It was impressive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, dads706 said:

11 or 12 combines. Doesn't seem like enough catch wagons. 

One day in Montana I pulled off onto the shoulder of the road and watched a similar harvest. Probably spent an hour just watching. It was impressive.

3 1500 bushel grain carts should keep up but barely . But you would need 6 or 7 semis maybe more hauling away. 70 or more bpa is 45000 or more bushels so a few truck loads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found a similar set up in someone’s yard oh about 1h 30min away from me. Sorry not great pics I was in the passenger seat and we couldn’t stop ?

A8627114-3CB9-48F9-9049-C3AF743447A3.thumb.jpeg.1a5d02bd6051c375325273570d5e74c8.jpeg

568EDB71-8724-41DC-9259-3D3A7FD0389C.thumb.jpeg.394c80a0f401a6dcdbc92e03d34d1905.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Farmer or custom operator? How many acres does he farm? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, kansas farmer said:

 Things have come a long way since the 50's!!  Pictures of my 1958 Gleaner A combine & 1959 Chevy Viking grain truck which I'm still using on my little farm here in Kansas.

You better get you an umbrella before you head off on the harvest - might need a little shade ?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sdman, I’m hoping I didn’t hijack your own thread.......

42 minutes ago, ChrisNY said:

Farmer or custom operator? How many acres does he farm? 

From what I’ve heard they are farmers and have around 100 thousand acres (yes you read that correct) and it’s all wheat.

I was just talking to dad about the outfit those guys have he said in years past they would have 20-25 combines and the first he thought he’d seen were 1688’s

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, exSW said:

Quad tracks amidst the green. Not an unusual sight. I wonder how the New Holland stacked up against the green.

Several quads pulling green equipment around too for now.  Judging by the amount of material we gotten in the mail, the picture SDman posted is what worries Case.  Almost all green or half green farms with a quad track.  On an operation with that much green equipment, on the next MUD trade in, it’s nothing for JD to sweeten the deal just a little more to switch out those quads for RXs to make it an all green lineup.  Happens around here.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

Several quads pulling green equipment around too for now.  Judging by the amount of material we gotten in the mail, the picture SDman posted is what worries Case.  Almost all green or half green farms with a quad track.  On an operation with that much green equipment, on the next MUD trade in, it’s nothing for JD to sweeten the deal just a little more to switch out those quads for RXs to make it an all green lineup.  Happens around here.  

Those rx aren’t selling that well here. For a low number unit available thing. RDO don in law ace brant holdings has a couple of newer track JD and a bunch of newer 4 Ed on a closeout sale on Steffes auction. This Brandt holdings has 3 different disposal companies they run.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Sdman, I’m hoping I didn’t hijack your own thread.......

From what I’ve heard they are farmers and have around 100 thousand acres (yes you read that correct) and it’s all wheat.

I was just talking to dad about the outfit those guys have he said in years past they would have 20-25 combines and the first he thought he’d seen were 1688’s

 

If it is same outfit I think it is. They used to have custom combiners then they bought 1688s. A bunch of 15 to 20 guys would go down there from ND and run combines for. The harvest. Thought at that time it was 30,000 acres they harvested half wheat half fallow

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, dale560 said:

If it is same outfit I think it is. They used to have custom combiners then they bought 1688s. A bunch of 15 to 20 guys would go down there from ND and run combines for. The harvest. Thought at that time it was 30,000 acres they harvested half wheat half fallow

Dale, I’m just going off info that I’ve heard. Along with their equipment there is also some guys that come down and custom cut for them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A little further explanation on the machinery. First off, the operation is run by 2 brothers. Their father and my father were friends going all the way back to the early 1960s when he moved to this country from Oklahoma. He was one of several Southerners that migrated to this country in the years after WWII...mostly via the custom cutter trail. I can remember him buying a new JD 6030 and 7520 in the mid-1970s. He farmed all around us with those 2 tractors for nearly 20 years; later on he added a Big Bud 525/50 and a Steiger ST-310 to the fleet. 

The 2 brothers that farm it now have always been a little partial to Steigers...probably since most of the John Deere dealers around sold more Steigers up until CaseIH bought Steiger in 1986 than they did their own John Deere line of 4wds. They currently have 2 9380s with 12-14,000 hours on them that they bought new; in addition to a 600 Quadtrac, 500 Quadtrac, and a 540 Quadtrac they just bought from us(that's the 2nd Quad in the photo...probably has 100 hours or so on it). They've tried the Deere Quadtracs, but haven't been very impressed with them overall. Like Dale says, the Deere Quads have just not sold all that well around here as well. I figured Deere would come out with some kind of a bounty program to get red Quads traded in for green ones. If they do, they haven't had much success around here with it.

The New Holland combine in the picture does actually belong to the brother that makes most of the machinery decisions...its his personal machine. If you notice, its a CX conventional combine, not a CR Twin-rotor. He tried 2 CaseIH Flagship machines that didn't work well for him(he had an 8010 that burned up, he had a 9120 that was one of those "built on a Monday" machines that just always seemed to have some little problem with it all the time); he tried a CR New Holland that he didn't like for some reason or another; he finally got this machine and is really happy with it. 

The Deere machines in the middle of the picture with all of their paneling/side shields removed are their machines as well. They remove all the paneling so they can keep them clean during sunflower harvest. Too many places for sunflower dust to build up inside the panels/covers, causing fire issues. All the other Deere machines are custom cutters...new S770s.

As far as the trucking is concerned, this field is pretty close for them. Their main storage facility is about 2 miles away from here. 4 or 5 grain train(double trailer) semi-tractors keep up with the combines in this photo.

I've often wondered at the wisdom of having all those combines in the same field at the same time. Most of the time when you cut wheat you go around the field in a circle pattern...the inside combines make a much smaller path in a round than the outside combines. A lot of times you will see the inside combines spending more time trying to avoid running into the machine ahead of them than cutting at full capacity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, SDman said:

The New Holland combine in the picture does actually belong to the brother that makes most of the machinery decisions...its his personal machine. If you notice, its a CX conventional combine, not a CR Twin-rotor.

I have heard before that the newer New Holland combines give a nice grain sample. Do you know how it compares to the Deere’s? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Dale, I’m just going off info that I’ve heard. Along with their equipment there is also some guys that come down and custom cut for them. 

This was 30 years ago when they would hire people from up here. Friends and neighbors would go down for a few weeks. 30,000 acres sticks in my head from what they said. I remember the guys saying some combines would have under a 100 hours some just over when they were traded every year. Just popped into my head their name was Linneberg or something like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

I have heard before that the newer New Holland combines give a nice grain sample. Do you know how it compares to the Deere’s? 

That’s the only CX conventional New Holland we have around here...all the rest are CR twin rotors. They have a good reputation for a good sample...they just lack capacity in good corn compared to a CaseIH Flagship machine. We’ve got some customers who have irrigated corn along the Missouri River which is 30 miles away from me. Those guys all went back to Flagship CaseIH combines after running New Hollands for a few years. They all had the same complaint...they couldn’t keep the grain in the back end of the combine with the New Holland twin rotors. This particular customer in the picture gets along better with a conventional combine for what crops he does with it anyway...he uses it mainly for small grain, sunflowers, and some millet on occasion. For corn and beans the Deere rotors do better. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...