Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
oldtanker

OT: Big Steam

Recommended Posts

train.thumb.jpg.d8159418a7d9679801729332b60c3d83.jpg

Took that photo this afternoon in Bruno MN has the UP 4014, 4-8-8-4 Big Boy made a short stop before moving on to Duluth. For those who don't know these engines were made to move military freight over the Rockies during WWII. 25 were made. 8 still exist with this being the only running example. The Union Pacific got possession and restored it as part of the 150 year anniversary of the completion of the trans continental RR.

 

Rick   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

went to look at it when it was in Omaha very impressive work very big  would have liked to see it working in its day

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Big Boy will be rolling through east central Iowa in 10 days or so; going to make sure I go see it rumble by!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool quite the sight. But curiosity killed the cat, what does OT mean? Your screen name Old Tanker?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Rick G. said:

Cool quite the sight. But curiosity killed the cat, what does OT mean? Your screen name Old Tanker?

Off topic.

In this case not related to farming in general. Some use it some don't.

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was in Omaha last Saturday but didn't know it was there, so I will have to catch it on the way back.  I really like those big steam locomotives.  Both 844 and 3985 have been to Sioux City in past years, but I guess 4014 won't on this trip.

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It went through Cambridge MN yesterday, I sure wish I could have seen it rumble through, only 20 miles from me, but was to busy hauling corn. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, oldtanker said:

Off topic.

In this case not related to farming in general. Some use it some don't.

Rick

Just goes to show you how far I am behind you young bucks Tanker.

I had presumed it meant "On Top of it"!!!🤣😉

*****

That's a big piece of iron---------anybody know what the Big Boy weighs?

Ya'll keep the pictures coming------we won't see it down this way.

 

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

Just goes to show you how far I am behind you young bucks Tanker.

I had presumed it meant "On Top of it"!!!🤣😉

*****

That's a big piece of iron---------anybody know what the Big Boy weighs?

Ya'll keep the pictures coming------we won't see it down this way.

 

DD

Loco weight 762,000 lb  

Tender weight 342,200 lb (2/3 load)

Total weight 1,250,000 lb or 625 tons

From what I've read in history that it was taking 3 engines with 3 crews to get troop and equipment trains over the Rockies. Diesels were out as the copper for the generators and drive motors (diesel/electrics) was needed for military. WWII and the great depression saw steam on the rails about an extra 15 years. A train back in that day would have had 2 guys just in the engine and a conductor minimum (the conductor on both passenger and freight controlled the engineer and speed/stops via the time tables). Plus 2 more per engine for each additional engine. So manpower was an issue. Plus the military had need of train crews too. So large steam engines that couple pull a train by itself was the order of the day. Here, in the US steam was all but dead by 1961/62. Anyways the 4-8-8-4 engines were pretty much built for the war effort and some pulled freight an extra 14 years before being retired. 1959 was the last run of one hire.

 

Rick

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Until now------I never had realized that the Big Boys were built for the war effort.

That's all interesting (besides the enormous size of it).

 

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Loco weight 762,000 lb  

Tender weight 342,200 lb (2/3 load)

Total weight 1,250,000 lb or 625 tons

From what I've read in history that it was taking 3 engines with 3 crews to get troop and equipment trains over the Rockies. Diesels were out as the copper for the generators and drive motors (diesel/electrics) was needed for military. WWII and the great depression saw steam on the rails about an extra 15 years. A train back in that day would have had 2 guys just in the engine and a conductor minimum (the conductor on both passenger and freight controlled the engineer and speed/stops via the time tables). Plus 2 more per engine for each additional engine. So manpower was an issue. Plus the military had need of train crews too. So large steam engines that couple pull a train by itself was the order of the day. Here, in the US steam was all but dead by 1961/62. Anyways the 4-8-8-4 engines were pretty much built for the war effort and some pulled freight an extra 14 years before being retired. 1959 was the last run of one hire.

 

Rick

 

...Rick......is that massive engine in the  Dearborne   (sp ??)  Michigan    , museum ,,,,,,,one of the above........That  museum was a fantastic place to visit...for a slice of Americana  ...and  some of the exhibits were  mind boggling    in size and , of course, innovation........ran out of camera   battery...hence missed the picture of that steam powered beast

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, mike_newman said:

...Rick......is that massive engine in the  Dearborne   (sp ??)  Michigan    , museum ,,,,,,,one of the above........That  museum was a fantastic place to visit...for a slice of Americana  ...and  some of the exhibits were  mind boggling    in size and , of course, innovation........ran out of camera   battery...hence missed the picture of that steam powered beast

Mike

From the pictures I'm finding that's a 2-6-6-2 . Several different versions were built and used world wide to include in South African and the Soviet Union. Again designed mostly to reduce the number of loco's needed to pull large trains. Almost but not quite as big as the 4-8-8-4. The American version 2-6-6-2 was developed mostly for WWI but lived on and IIRC the last known run actually earning it's keep was in 1961 or 62 pulling iron ore cars for the Duluth, Mesabi and Iron Range RR. From what I can find the last batch of those ordered were purchased in either 1940 or 41. Now I wouldn't take that to the bank as I'm working on stuff I read maybe 8 or 10 years ago.

Some of those things are real monsters. That one is about 2/3's the weight of the Big Boy.

In the day some tractors were huge by today's standards. One, the Holt 75 (Hold and Best eventually merged to form Cat) http://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/005/2/0/5205-holt-75-photos.html was 20 feet long, 8 wide and 10 foot to the top of the canopy and tipped the scales at 23,000 pounds! On a side note the Holt 5 ton, 75 and 120 all saw service in WWI as artillery tractors.

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

......thanks, Rick

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

From the pictures I'm finding that's a 2-6-6-2

I'd always thought it was a 4-8-8-4, now I dunno.  

Thinking back, when I was first hired at North Central I can remember flying DC-3s over the D, M and IR yards/activities near Proctor when landing at Duluth.  That was the summer of 1960 and I don't recall seeing anymore of that in the succeeding years.  

best, randy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes 1961 was the last year they ran the Yellow stones.  The one that is in the museum at the depot in Duluth sat in the round house for years. Finally we got it ready to bring down to the depot. We put a large roller chain sprocket on the inside of the drivers on both engines so that when we raised the engine up just a fraction of a inch off the rails at the depot it could be operational on a timed interval. Big Boys and Yellow Stones are very similar. The Yellow Stones the DM&IRRY ordered were first used by the Western Pacific and the Rio Grand during the War.

My wife and I were at the depot yesterday and got a good look at the Big Boy, it is a sight to behold !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Off topic.

In this case not related to farming in general. Some use it some don't.

Rick

Oh duh OK. Sorry. But hey if it’s here in the “coffee shop” board it shouldn’t have to be considered “off topic”. Now if you posted this say in the “General IH” section than it may be considered “off topic”. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The national railroad museum in Green Bay WI has #4017 Big Boy on static display.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yellowstones are a 2-8-8-4 from what I read.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They made them in various configurations depending on what was/who ordered and or who made them. There were  2-6-6-2, 2-6-6-4, 4-6-6-2 and 4-6-6-4 models out there from various years. There was a 2-8-8-2 also. 

They tried a 2-8-8-8-2 and a 2-10-10-2 configuration prior to the 4-8-8-4. So really the 4-8-8-4 engine should be considered the "largest successful" locomotive ever built. The problem with the 2-8-8-8-2 and 2-10-10-2 was that curves had to be really wide. Without tearing up rails and taking even more land they could only run something like that in very small areas. So mostly they were built as test/experimental and never went into full production. 

Rick

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, augercreek said:

Yes 1961 was the last year they ran the Yellow stones.  The one that is in the museum at the depot in Duluth sat in the round house for years. Finally we got it ready to bring down to the depot. We put a large roller chain sprocket on the inside of the drivers on both engines so that when we raised the engine up just a fraction of a inch off the rails at the depot it could be operational on a timed interval. Big Boys and Yellow Stones are very similar. The Yellow Stones the DM&IRRY ordered were first used by the Western Pacific and the Rio Grand during the War.

My wife and I were at the depot yesterday and got a good look at the Big Boy, it is a sight to behold !

Yes it was. I'm not a huge steam engine fan but they are cool and I'm glad that someone is keeping them going. 

I would like to get over to Duluth and really spend a couple of days riding the scenic rail, maybe the excursion ship and seeing the museums.

Rick 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

They made them in various configurations depending on what was/who ordered and or who made them. There were  2-6-6-2, 2-6-6-4, 4-6-6-2 and 4-6-6-4 models out there from various years. There was a 2-8-8-2 also. 

They tried a 2-8-8-8-2 and a 2-10-10-2 configuration prior to the 4-8-8-4. So really the 4-8-8-4 engine should be considered the "largest successful" locomotive ever built. The problem with the 2-8-8-8-2 and 2-10-10-2 was that curves had to be really wide. Without tearing up rails and taking even more land they could only run something like that in very small areas. So mostly they were built as test/experimental and never went into full production. 

Rick

 

That is not really correct.......the big articulated engines were maintenance intensive and were steam hungry.....before the super power steam locomotives, feeding a big brute like a 2-10-10-2 or the beasts on the Erie the boilers just couldn't supply enough to get anything done.  Between Lima and Alco making advancements in design along with working with the engineering departments on the railroads it made the Big Boy possible.  Lima's 2-6-6-6 built for the C&O were the heaviest and highest hp beasts ever built, but operationally they never impressed.  N&W's A's and Y6's were probably the most impressive articulated locomotives, they could squeeze more power from water and fuel than the rest.  Atleast they saved a J, A, and Y6...........Scrapping all NYC Super Hudsons and Niagras was a failure in thought IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

glad that someone is keeping them going

Concur!  Guess that I pretty much have a "ho hum" attitude about aircraft (we went close to a million pounds on the 747 for takeoffs) but railroad engines have always fascinated me.  Even that small loco kept in the Rock Island roundhouse at Lake Park, Iowa when I was growing up on the farm.  (Try'n now to remember now what they called it - "Mudhen?????)

best, randy  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

That is not really correct.......the big articulated engines were maintenance intensive and were steam hungry.....before the super power steam locomotives, feeding a big brute like a 2-10-10-2 or the beasts on the Erie the boilers just couldn't supply enough to get anything done.  Between Lima and Alco making advancements in design along with working with the engineering departments on the railroads it made the Big Boy possible.  Lima's 2-6-6-6 built for the C&O were the heaviest and highest hp beasts ever built, but operationally they never impressed.  N&W's A's and Y6's were probably the most impressive articulated locomotives, they could squeeze more power from water and fuel than the rest.  Atleast they saved a J, A, and Y6...........Scrapping all NYC Super Hudsons and Niagras was a failure in thought IMO.

OK, I'm not going to argue that but what I read stated that curve radius played a large part in the failures of those. My source could be wrong.

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the picture. I had hoped to see it in either Iowa Falls or Mason City but my schedule didn't allow.

When in Duluth a few years ago my son and I went to a railroad museum on a rainy day. I enjoyed, they have a lot on display.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...