Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I see round wire corn cribs in pictures, I live in Alabama, and our cribs are made out of wood. Is the climate difference where they have those wire Cribs? I just saw one in the picture with that nice 666 tractor, I think that was in ILL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the wood ones here pre-dated the availability of the round wire ones.....................The wood ones also being narrower seem to get better air flow through them and keep the corn better.  I like feeding ground ear corn but its getting harder and harder to get good ear corn.  The crib on the place here was torn down in the early 60's, if I get enough saw logs together I threatened to put it back up with some changes.  Plus the drive through storage area would be nice.  Most here were 4 ft wide cribs, from a foot off the ground to the roof on each side with the drive through area in the middle.  Filled through roof openings with a elevator and a chute from those to the cribs.  Most unloaded to the inside but one here had slopes in the bottom and unloaded to the outside through doors, I loved that one, never had much to shovel and cleaned out real nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we had a couple of 1500 bu round wire Behlen cribs.   We wanted to get them empty by late spring, even after we built our own 2' x 2' ventilators that went just about to the fill hole.  Not sure you could ever get corn dry in them now, humid as it always seems to be.   We'd save the long narrow wooden cribs for the summer months

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just so everybody knows, Bob and Phylis Johnson who wrote "The Corn Picker Book" are working on the "Corn CRIB Book.  No release date yet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve never seen the one at my place filled. There hasn’t been ear corn in this area since probably the late 60’s early 70’s. There aren’t even pickers left stashed in barns anywhere I know of locally.  There was a time that everything was planted to corn very year and it was all put in the bin to be ground for hog/cattle feed. The hogs disappeared with the prices in the early/mid 90’s and the cattle left around here aren’t nearly as plentiful as they used to be either. Never a big dairy area, just beef cattle. 

C54089AE-9C19-4013-A2F8-882AED4E7F43.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use to put up temporary corn cribs using snow fence for eared corn in the 60's

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

I’ve never seen the one at my place filled. There hasn’t been ear corn in this area since probably the late 60’s early 70’s. There aren’t even pockets left stashed in barns anywhere I know of locally.  There was a time that everything was planted to corn very year and it was all put in the bin to be ground for hog/cattle feed. The hogs disappeared with the prices in the early/mid 90’s and the cattle left around here aren’t nearly as plentiful as they used to be either. Never a big dairy area, just beef cattle. 

C54089AE-9C19-4013-A2F8-882AED4E7F43.jpeg

These things were on almost every farm.  After we all grew more corn than we could fit the in wooden double alley cribs these sprung up everywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had wood and round.  Seemed to have to fight every ear in the round cribs. They would just hang there. A wall of packed corn. More rats in the wooden crib it seemed, but at least the corn flowed in to drag feed easier. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had what at the time seemed like a fairly large wood crib and an even larger round cement crib. Dad put up ear corn with a uni harvestor picker till around 80' maybe. Then the wood crib say empty and we plastered the cement crib and tried to store shelled corn in it but i dont think it worked that well.

Fil worked for a couple of my uncles on dads side as a young man and said my grandfather was very good at setting up temporary cribs. Said setting the next layer and keeping it from falling in was an art and gramps did it well. Before my time as he passed when i was 2 or 3.

Still a wood crib on my place tho its in very poor cond. I park the 560 and 826 in the drive in center but the sun is about all it keeps off them. 😄

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dad used to pick ear corn with a two row mounted on a 560 an MH2 i believe . We had 2 round cribs and rented three more from a neighbor, it became my job to unload them into the old Gehl grinder mixer. The top two thirds was easy just pull out some boards and meter the flow when you got to the bottom get out the scoop shovel. My dad was thrifty and the" new fangled" as he called them aluminum scoops would wear out pretty quickly on the rough poured concrete. He went and bought a steel scoop shovel somewhere that weighed as much empty as the aluminum one's did full.

One thing i will never forget is that you always tucked your pants into your boots when shoveling ear corn,as the mice came running out they were looking for anything they could find to climb up including your leg , it's quite an experience a mouse making laps inside your jeans. The big black snakes were always plentiful as well searching for the mice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had 2 single wood cribs (one torn down and a new grain bin set up on that very spot) and a big double crib with the driveway in the middle of it. The hard part about shoveling corn out of wood crib is nails in the floor boards would work loose and catch the aluminum scoop shovel! nothing worse than trying to get a shovel full of corn to throw in the grinder and have the shovel stop suddenly on a nail.  We built a wire crib in the late 1960s (which is still standing I hear) that held over 2000 bushels of ear corn. Problem was it was a rat nest every year! and corn near the bottom would mold if water splashed up on it from rain. I always thought we should have poured more concrete and put the crib up a foot or two higher.  I wonder somedays how many thousands of bushels of ear corn I unloaded from wagons into those 4 cribs... and double that for feeding hogs or grinding feed for the dairy cows. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one I use for firewood storage does real well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Around here in SE Iowa, we have quite a few empty wire cribs, but the biggest dead horse monuments are the Vinton style concrete cribs.  Installed in the mid-late 50s then combine harvesting took root in the mid 60's creating large infrastructure with no use.  Most of the time the slats were too wide for shelled corn, and aereation inadequate.  Most could at least use the overhead bins for beans or a wet holding tank for a grain dryer.  Lots of them wound up being utilized as a support for a gain leg. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, M35A2 said:

Around here in SE Iowa, we have quite a few empty wire cribs, but the biggest dead horse monuments are the Vinton style concrete cribs.  Installed in the mid-late 50s then combine harvesting took root in the mid 60's creating large infrastructure with no use.  Most of the time the slats were too wide for shelled corn, and aereation inadequate.  Most could at least use the overhead bins for beans or a wet holding tank for a grain dryer.  Lots of them wound up being utilized as a support for a gain leg. 

The area over the driveway of our wood crib was three grain bins,  two square ones in the north half, the whole south half was one bin with two chutes to empty it. Hate to guess how much capacity they were, 1500 to 2000 bushel total. Plenty of room for our 40 acres of oats every year. We used the oats to reduce the amount of shell corn we had to buy to feed the hogs. Haul them to town, mix the oats with 2000-3000# of corn, grind and head home.

After we moved off that farm the new owner put up 3 steel grain bins for shell corn in what was the loafing yard for the cattle.

South end of the driveway of the crib was a platform scale, platform large enough to weigh a one ton truck. Think it was 12,000# capacity?  Never weighed a single thing on it.  Crib had a Kewanee inside elevator and a drag conveyor recessed into the driveway floor.  Was great when it worked, flip a switch and unload, but when the chain jumped off the sprockets it took a long hard day, maybe two if something broke, to get it running again.

The crib still stands but I imagine it's been many years since it's been used.  I forget what year it was, early '60's Dad had a snow fence crib on a concrete floor between the front barn and water tank. Think it was 3 tiers high, pretty good pile of corn,  took most of the winter to grind it up for the cattle. Think he had an extra 20 acres of corn that year than the normal rotation.

Neighbor converted his ear corn crib to shell corn storage when he put a grain leg up and two big grain bins with dryers. Ripped all the wood off the walls and put up special perforated steel panels. Worked fine till the corn picked up moisture, got hot and set the crib on fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used 2 double cribs with the center alley way and overhead bins when I was a kid. I just remember but was to young to help with a single wooden crib and Dad piling ear corn on the ground inside a picket fence.

I helped a few neighbors shell wire cribs like that. Always made me appreciate our double cribs with the tunnel for the drag. Sometimes those wire cribs didn't roll very well and required a lot of raking and scooping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have lots of experience shoveling out round cribs, snow fence cribs, double drive thru cribs and the tall skinny pole cribs. I am ok to never have to shovel another one out...

I prefer to sit in mine and relax now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, new guy said:

I have lots of experience shoveling out round cribs, snow fence cribs, double drive thru cribs and the tall skinny pole cribs. I am ok to never have to shovel another one out...

I prefer to sit in mine and relax now!

I do not farm, so therefore I have no corn crib.  However, not only did we have the wood double crib and a wooden single crib, but 4 wire cribs.  If that wasn't enough torture, we also did custom corn shelling.  I have seen way too many ear corn storages.  Corn was usually sealed, so what did not get fed to livestock was shelled in August and delivered to Commodity Credit.  This in the fifties, by the way.

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Souix and behlen were the big ones around here . Most souix with the angle iron frame made good dog pens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Ron Cook said:

we also did custom corn shelling

Same here for me. It was my summer job for the better part of 10 years. One time we had 4 shellers in our possession. One we completely stripped for parts. We actually had a double and a single auger to pull corn to the drag on non tunnel cribs. Saved a lot of work for sure. Had to be careful with the single as it would screw itself into the corn and stop. I did everything from shoveling to running those power rakes as some called them to eventually running the sheller. I personally hated the round ones. Spoiled corn, lots of critters, and tons of shoveling. 

I have fond memories of those days that I wouldn't trade for anything. But I'd sure hate to go back to it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, red tractor fever said:

Same here for me. It was my summer job for the better part of 10 years. One time we had 4 shellers in our possession. One we completely stripped for parts. We actually had a double and a single auger to pull corn to the drag on non tunnel cribs. Saved a lot of work for sure. Had to be careful with the single as it would screw itself into the corn and stop. I did everything from shoveling to running those power rakes as some called them to eventually running the sheller. I personally hated the round ones. Spoiled corn, lots of critters, and tons of shoveling. 

I have fond memories of those days that I wouldn't trade for anything. But I'd sure hate to go back to it now.

I've seen power rakes but never been around 1 running. The guys I helped shell round cribs had the next best thing...a high school kid with a corn rake and grain scoop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, IH Forever said:

I've seen power rakes but never been around 1 running. The guys I helped shell round cribs had the next best thing...a high school kid with a corn rake and grain scoop.

We rarely used the single after getting the double cause the double just worked better. We had a few places the studs were to close the double wouldn't fit. And the double had a cable on the back. We would take it in the round cribs, osha would not approve 😁. But it did save a lot of work. 

And your statement of a high school kid with a rake and a shovel, that was me a lot. Guys would call to line up shelling, then ask if I could come to. I still have my shovel my grandpa gave me after he put my initial on it. Funny thing tho, it hasn't scooped corn in years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we had a 4 foot wide wood crib, for cows, however there were always a few pigs around was fun to give them ear corn to eat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys had it easy...................we and some others around here FILLED cribs with a scoop shovel into the early 90's with scoop shovels off flat wagons with sides.  They had a row of doors across the top about just above head height when you were standing on the empty wagon deck.  Filled the wagons with 3' sides on heeped in the middle and you started digging to the bottom in the back corner, once you found the deck with the shovel, start pitching to the holes in the crib.  Never was more in awe when locations changed and the other cribs had holes in the roof for elevators!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TP from Central PA said:

You guys had it easy...................we and some others around here FILLED cribs with a scoop shovel into the early 90's with scoop shovels off flat wagons with sides.  They had a row of doors across the top about just above head height when you were standing on the empty wagon deck.  Filled the wagons with 3' sides on heeped in the middle and you started digging to the bottom in the back corner, once you found the deck with the shovel, start pitching to the holes in the crib.  Never was more in awe when locations changed and the other cribs had holes in the roof for elevators!

Are you Amish? 

 

Sorry...couldn't resist....😂🤣😁

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, new guy said:

Are you Amish? 

 

Sorry...couldn't resist....😂🤣😁

A little pennsylvania dutch in all of us:lol:  Personally I thought it was nuts, but at a young age you do what your told.  I was told the cribs pre-dated mechanical corn pickers and that is why they were setup like that because they manually husked onto flat wagons.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...