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exSW

Square balers and memories

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Since Tonyinca has a baler restoration thread going I thought a thread about idiot cube makers we all thought highly of was in order. New Holland 269&273's with the SuperSweep pickup were the standard here for years. I had a 720 Oliver for a few years that impressed the heck out of me. JD 336,AC 444 to name a few more.

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New Holland 311is a good one too. We have one that Dad and Grandpa bought new in 1986. Seen a lot of bales through that over the years 

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I saw a JD 348 that was basically brand new advertised a couple months a go. In Nebraska.$14,000.00. I didn't know square balers were that back in style.

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International 47, chute baler for years till brother went to college then Dad bought a thrower for it.  Worked great never missed a bale. Park brake slipped on 706 an run off an jackknifed, bent bale chamber. NH 273 ok baler, then a NH 320, had to really push the hay through that thing to keep a nice shaped bale

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Not exactly reliable, but still good memories of riding the rack behind the IH 46. ¬†We never did do a lot of square bales but back when we had hogs in open front sheds, we went through quite a bit of straw. I can still hear the rhythm of plunger being pulled by the SMTA. Whenever I hear the song ‚Äúset ‚Äėem up joe‚ÄĚ , by Vern gosden, it‚Äôs the same thing.¬†

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One and only 50 T , First year was awful, right side would never tie. Found a timing issue with the chain . After that and knower adjustments, never missed again that I remember. 

Ran over a snapping turtle and baled up some snake ūüźć¬†

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This tread made me think back to the balers.  Recall the first ones that did any work for us when I was growing up on our farm in southern MN, IIRC it was a New Holland that a few older kids ran.  Two guys sat on the back end, to thread the wires thru the already done loop on that baling wire, then wind it to create that bale .  Must'a been circa 1947.

Then, later came the balers that used twine with their automatic knotters.

best, randy

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1 hour ago, exSW said:

I saw a JD 348 that was basically brand new advertised a couple months a go. In Nebraska.$14,000.00. I didn't know square balers were that back in style.

They are very much in style with the horse crowd, especially on the outskirts of a larger town.  Up and down the front range about everything is small squared.  Last year people were buying good small bales of grass for $15/ea out of the covered stack. 

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11 minutes ago, nc1112 said:

They are very much in style with the horse crowd, especially on the outskirts of a larger town.  Up and down the front range about everything is small squared.  Last year people were buying good small bales of grass for $15/ea out of the covered stack. 

We sell square bales to horse farms in Lexington, Kentucky. Alfalfa pure and mix. CIH 8520.

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1973, 273 with thrower. Dad and my uncle bought new. Both milked and she baled a lots of bales. I sold it in 2009. They bought a 2 year old 850 round baler in 1978, but still used the 273 quite a bit. Probably around 1978/79 the axle on the pickup side broke on the other end of the field. Dad called Carl the parts guy from Farmers Grain at home because after hours and I rode with Mom and we picked Carl up and took him to the dealership and he got a new axle and we took him back home. It must have happened on a Friday or Saturday late afternoon because Carl was also a part time cop for the police department. He asked Mom when we left the dealership if she could drive through the main drag in town taking him back home. There was teenage kids doing what teenage kids do, hanging around talking with friends on the sidewalks by businesses. Carl said, see that's what we're working on. Breaking up all that lingering and loitering. Lol! Anyway, getting back to the baler, the needle arm/knotter arm broke right above the turnbuckle, this is the later 70s, and I don't know who welded it, dad, my uncle, or Grandpa, but the thing wouldn't tie right. This was at straw baling time. Dad had to cut wheat at my uncle's, so he told me Adam is coming out to look at the baler can you hang around and help him if he needs something. So I did. Adam came and said you start the baler and throw straw in and I'll stand back here and watch the knotters. So I start the Hydro 70 get the baler a goin and start tossing flakes of straw in the pickup. Adam's a watchin it trying to tie. He came to me and said shut er down I see the problem. So I did. He laughed with his cigar in his mouth and said who's the turkey that welded that arm? He said that's the problem. He went back to town, got a new arm, and we tried it again and she worked. The plunger arm broke in the early 90s. Course dad and Grandpa welded that, and used a little extra bracing for strength and that held clear up to when I sold it. Also had to replace the long rod the driven sheath for the thrower sat on. The spline's were shot. That was probably 5 years before I sold it. It was a good baler overall. It did alot of work for no more major repairs it needed.

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1 hour ago, nc1112 said:

They are very much in style with the horse crowd, especially on the outskirts of a larger town.  Up and down the front range about everything is small squared.  Last year people were buying good small bales of grass for $15/ea out of the covered stack. 

Yes I know someone who's in that market. $15.00 for a 66# bale. But I think it's 25 bale minimum at that price.

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Two local Amish just bought new Deere balers throwed  steel wheels on them and cobbled up Honda motors on them. Personally I like setting in cab watching them rolls pop out .

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OH BOY----a baler thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!;)

Mike

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17 minutes ago, mikem said:

OH BOY----a baler thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!;)

Mike

Quit it.

 

 

Or I'll start an oil thread.:lol:

  • Haha 5

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I was just thinking about NH balers recently.  My Dad has a 269, I can't even imagine how many bales we pushed through that when I was a kid.  He also has and old 69 which has a stalk chopper in place of a pickup.  We didn't use that a lot but would bale corn stalk bales if we didn't have enough straw.  We had a neighbor with a 273 and another with a 276.

So I was wondering from a 269 to a 273 to a 276, is there a capacity difference or just newer models?  I assume the 311 is newer but also bigger?

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there was a NH 270 baler here that I bought with the farm in 1980. the farmer said it worked good but didn't throw worth a darn. I tightened up all the belts between the flywheel and thrower, and then it would throw to the second wagon back if I asked it to. the 270 burned up in the barn fire in 1989.

i had a JD 24T for a little while, ok but nothing to write home about.

then heard about a NH 311 owned by a guy that had bought it new and had quit farming severals years back. the baler was never cleand out and the remains of the hay bales in the chamber were about 8" high. cleaned it out, greased it, and I have had a great baler ever since.

I also have a NH Super 77 that needs a motor, or (preferably) a pto driveline, under cover next door. also a similarly designed Massey harris #1? baler, and a Case 132? baler, all of which might get played with if I live to 130 yrs of age.

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18 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

I was just thinking about NH balers recently.  My Dad has a 269, I can't even imagine how many bales we pushed through that when I was a kid.  He also has and old 69 which has a stalk chopper in place of a pickup.  We didn't use that a lot but would bale corn stalk bales if we didn't have enough straw.  We had a neighbor with a 273 and another with a 276.

So I was wondering from a 269 to a 273 to a 276, is there a capacity difference or just newer models?  I assume the 311 is newer but also bigger?

269 was replaced by the 273, which was replaced by the 310,  which was replaced by the 311. all were the smallest models of their series. biggest difference in the balers was the 311 had a vertically travelling feed chain, like the older 270/271 models. 268/269/273/310 all had horizontal feed chains. vertical made much nicer shaped bales. one reason I loved my old 270.

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My memories start almost exactly 50 years ago next month. Riding the "bale float" behind a neighbour's NH 69 baler. Picking up heavy oat swaths and that baler could not tie a tight bale no matter what we did. Sloppy, heavy"banana bales" with the August heat, oat dust. I don' think you could pay me enough to do that now but back then I was happy to be making $1 an hour. We made a lot of bales. Memories of that make me really appreciate the cool, dust free cab on the 2090 Case while the 847 baler rolls up the rounds.

My dad got  a NH 270 baler in the late 70s that had made a lot of bales for previous owner . We made a lot with it as well.

Dad baling 40.jpg

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Dad had a NH is all I remember and remember him cussing the knotters.

Went to help neighbors do small squares one summer.

They had a thrower and my job was to stack in the catch wagon.

I went down more times than Frazier in the Foreman fight...

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Until around 15 years ago I always baled 5 acres with a '35 F20 and a '49 IH 50T that worked perfect..........until there was a malfunction and the needle got intimate with the plunger and the fun was over.

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6 minutes ago, ihcbill said:

with a '35 F20

That 1935 F-20 couldn't have been very much later/after what we called a "Regular"?  Ours was a 1937.  Red, not gray.

best, randy

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Yup it was born gray but its been repainted red twice years ago.

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5 hours ago, mikem said:

OH BOY----a baler thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!;)

Mike

...couple of pics for "mikem"........who has fond memories of the "venerable"    IH  55T baler........

David Brown    50D  is the tractor.....

Mike

post-157-1216112003.jpg

post-157-1218967496.jpg

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13 minutes ago, mike_newman said:

...couple of pics for "mikem"........who has fond memories of the "venerable"    IH  55T baler........

David Brown    50D  is the tractor.....

Mike

post-157-1216112003.jpg

post-157-1218967496.jpg

Baling in the crik ?

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