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Aftermath of Pearl Harbor


Steve C.

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This has a bunch of stills and footage that I've never seen:

 

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I did not know that these ships were recommissioned. It is easy to get lost in the troubles of our day to day life. We must never forget the price that was paid by these valiant brave young men so that we can live the carefree life that we do today. 

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I love history and seeing that was interesting to see thanks for posting. I liked how it ended with what Al Brick said. 

I wonder what brand of tractor that is starting at about the 4:31 mark 

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Just now, IHhogfarmer said:

I love history and seeing that was interesting to see thanks for posting. I liked how it ended with what Al Brick said. 

I wonder what brand of tractor that is starting at about the 4:31 mark 

I wondered that myself.  Bet someone here knows.

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10 minutes ago, Steve C. said:

I wondered that myself.  Bet someone here knows.

I had thought McCormick now I’m wondering Cockshutt. The model # escapes me right now but it looks similar to the one I’m picturing in my head. 

11 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

I did not know that these ships were recommissioned.

Neither did I (from what I’ve learned about Pearl Harbor) I found it interesting that some of the planes could be repaired. 

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2 minutes ago, IHhogfarmer said:

I had thought McCormick now I’m wondering Cockshutt. The model # escapes me right now but it looks similar to the one I’m picturing in my head. 

Neither did I (from what I’ve learned about Pearl Harbor) I found it interesting that some of the planes could be repaired. 

Several of the repaired battleships got their revenge here:

https://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/wwii/pearl-harbor-revenge-the-battle-of-surigao-strait/

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Here's a book on the resurrection and repair of the ships damaged in the attack. It's an excellent read with great pictures as well. I'm a bit of a Pearl Harbor buff having visited the Arizona Memorial at least a half dozen times. It still makes me misty....

Resurrection
 by Daniel Madsen
 
I have a hard cover but I think a Kindle is available.
 
Required reading in grade school was Day of Infamy by Walter Lord. It was newly published in the '50s. There's got to be a Kindle by now.
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8 minutes ago, New Englander said:

Here's a book on the resurrection and repair of the ships damaged in the attack. It's an excellent read with great pictures as well. I'm a bit of a Pearl Harbor buff having visited the Arizona Memorial at least a half dozen times. It still makes me misty....

Resurrection
 by Daniel Madsen
 
I have a hard cover but I think a Kindle is available.
 
Required reading in grade school was Day of Infamy by Walter Lord. It was newly published in the '50s. There's got to be a Kindle by now.

Interesting how we've been taught that the attack was a total surprise.

Admiral Kimmel, the scapegoat of Pearl Harbor, said in February of 1941 "I feel that a surprise attack (submarine, air, or combined) on Pearl Harbor is a possibility, and we are taking immediate practical steps to minimize the damage inflicted and to ensure that the attacking force will pay."

His predecessor, Admiral Richardson, was relieved of the command for voicing the same concerns.

FDR had to know.

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2 minutes ago, Steve C. said:

Interesting how we've been taught that the attack was a total surprise.

Admiral Kimmel, the scapegoat of Pearl Harbor, said in February of 1941 "I feel that a surprise attack (submarine, air, or combined) on Pearl Harbor is a possibility, and we are taking immediate practical steps to minimize the damage inflicted and to ensure that the attacking force will pay."

His predecessor, Admiral Richardson, was relieved of the command for voicing the same concerns.

FDR had to know.

Conspiracy theories make for interesting reading.

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3 minutes ago, New Englander said:

Conspiracy theories make for interesting reading.

Actually they, that is FDR's Department of the Navy issued a war warning just weeks before the attack on Pearl harbor. So no conspiracy there. 

Was it a dastardly sneak attack? Not really, we knew that war was coming, just no one said it aloud. Was the attack a surprise? 100%. Remember that Roosevelt was getting advice on Naval operations from the Navy. In fact back in the day the state department was against spying. So most of our intel came from the intelligence branches of the Army and Navy. Roosevelt was convinced that each branch was only telling him what the brass wanted him to hear. That is why he enlisted Col "Wild Bill" Donovan (later General) to become the 'Coordinator of Information" which turned into the OSS.  

What most folks miss is the mindset of most of the senior officers in the Navy. And that was is the Japanese were going to do anything it would be surface action. Not air. Most senior Navy Brass were "battleship sailors". They though that any attack would be closed to home and that the US battle fleet would sail out to meet the enemy. Heck they had the standard picket line out even for Hawaii. Destroyers and subs who would radio contact giving the fleet time to build up steam , sail out, take up a battle formation and slug it out. The Navy had told Col Billy Mitchell that his sinking a moored battle ship proved nothing, that aircraft would fail to hit a ship maneuvering at sea. The battleship guys even after Dec 7 thought that the battleship would be the defining naval weapon of the war.  

Rick

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6 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

 The battleship guys even after Dec 7 thought that the battleship would be the defining naval weapon of the war.  

Rick

Exactly! The old Navy brass was still convinced that carriers were a novelty and the real battles would be fought by battlewagons. As it turned out the Japanese had already shown them that air power was the new weapon, they just had a hard time accepting it.

My remark on conspiracy theories was tongue-in-cheek.

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1 hour ago, New Englander said:

Here's a book on the resurrection and repair of the ships damaged in the attack. It's an excellent read with great pictures as well. I'm a bit of a Pearl Harbor buff having visited the Arizona Memorial at least a half dozen times. It still makes me misty....

Resurrection
 by Daniel Madsen
 
I have a hard cover but I think a Kindle is available.
 
Required reading in grade school was Day of Infamy by Walter Lord. It was newly published in the '50s. There's got to be a Kindle by now.

I was told by one of former employees that visited there back in the early 90's that the majority of the people are Japanese that live there. Very few Polynesians live today. Is this any truth?

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If i recall my history correctly Fdr wanted to get involved in the war earlier on to help Great Britan but other politicians were having none of it till Pearl Harbor....

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19 minutes ago, Bushwacker1 said:

I was told by one of former employees that visited there back in the early 90's that the majority of the people are Japanese that live there. Very few Polynesians live today. Is this any truth?

That's true. Asians are the majority - mostly Japanese and Filipinos along with Chinese, Vietnamese, etc. There are but 3-4% Native Hawaiians and a few Samoans. I don't really remember exactly.  

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2 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

If i recall my history correctly Fdr wanted to get involved in the war earlier on to help Great Britan but other politicians were having none of it till Pearl Harbor....

Exactly correct. It wasn't only politicians but the American public had no appetite for getting involved in another European war. All that changed of course on December 7th.......... 

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44 minutes ago, New Englander said:

That's true. Asians are the majority - mostly Japanese and Filipinos along with Chinese, Vietnamese, etc. There are but 3-4% Native Hawaiians and a few Samoans. I don't really remember exactly.  

Well......does that mean that the property that Americans fought for has been given back but the USA still just flies the 50 stars flag on the islands?

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20 minutes ago, Bushwacker1 said:

Well......does that mean that the property that Americans fought for has been given back but the USA still just flies the 50 stars flag on the islands?

Ha! No The USA annexed the island back in the 19th century and is keeping it. I remember when it was admitted as a state in, I believe, '59.

Here's the population. Remember that it encompasses all the islands and is different island by island. One island for instance is strictly native Hawaiians. Also consider that Hawaii has a huge mixed population and has had since whites and natives began marrying back when first discovered. That has continued and Asians, whites, blacks, natives continue to mix. It's a melting pot but they, like we on the continental US, are all Americans.

  • Asian: 38.02%
  • White: 25.13%
  • Two or more races: 23.81%
  • Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander: 10.03%
  • Black or African American: 1.82%
  • Other race: 0.99%
  • Native American: 0.19%
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I may be wrong and predidice but I can't help it. My Mom lost her youngest brother at Pearl Harbor. In my eyes those damn japs took away my ever knowing him. Then a few years ago when we visited Pearl Harbor in the morning and when they played the national anthem the orientals paid no attention and didn't even remove their hats. Their kids were running wild while they screamed at them. The true americans stopped removed hats and all stood at attention. Even when they boated us out to the Arizona the orientals didn't pay any attention to what was going on and were jerking off. I was really pi$$ed and had to bite my tongue to keep from getting into a fight. I'm sorry but I just can't forgive the japs for what they done!!

jerry

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I had a somewhat different experience there than Jerry did.  I was told to be there (at the AZ Memorial) when they open to avoid a long wait (good idea btw).  Many of the visitors there were of Asian heritage.  After watching the movie about what lead up to the attack, the lights turn on and we stand up to leave for the shuttle boats.  The stares that were given to the Asian visitors could kill and a lot them did not make any eye contact or even get on the boats to the ship monument.....

I didn't have any relatives at Pearl Harbor at the start of the war, but did have an Uncle involved in the Atomic Bomb to end it.  

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2 hours ago, New Englander said:

 public had no appetite for getting involved in another European war. All that changed of course on December 7th.......... 

Yup, concur!

best, randy

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4 hours ago, New Englander said:

Here's a book on the resurrection and repair of the ships damaged in the attack. It's an excellent read with great pictures as well. I'm a bit of a Pearl Harbor buff having visited the Arizona Memorial at least a half dozen times. It still makes me misty....

Resurrection
 by Daniel Madsen
 
I have a hard cover but I think a Kindle is available.
 
Required reading in grade school was Day of Infamy by Walter Lord. It was newly published in the '50s. There's got to be a Kindle by now.

Descent Into Darkness is another good read, written by one of the Navy divers who actually did the work.  It is simply unbelievable how they patched, floated, and righted those ships while working by feel.  Not to mention working in many cases amongst the remains of the fallen sailors from December 7.

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45 minutes ago, SMOKER 1 said:

I may be wrong and predidice but I can't help it. My Mom lost her youngest brother at Pearl Harbor. In my eyes those damn japs took away my ever knowing him. Then a few years ago when we visited Pearl Harbor in the morning and when they played the national anthem the orientals paid no attention and didn't even remove their hats. Their kids were running wild while they screamed at them. The true americans stopped removed hats and all stood at attention. Even when they boated us out to the Arizona the orientals didn't pay any attention to what was going on and were jerking off. I was really pi$$ed and had to bite my tongue to keep from getting into a fight. I'm sorry but I just can't forgive the japs for what they done!!

jerry

My mother in laws  uncle was killed in Pearl Harbor. Her dad my wifes grandpa fought in the pacific theater for 3 years. When mother and father law went to Hawaii the specifically wanted to visit the Arizona. And my wife said her grandpa would say damn japs everyday of his life.

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I spent a weekend in Perl Harbor in 1977.  Command Change to the 7th Fleet for a West Pac cruise, We were berthed right cross from the Arizona Memorial.  I was Officer of the Deck for 8 hours, 0800 to 1200 watch on Sat and Sun because I took someone else's duty so they could enjoy Hawaii.  My watch had morning colors both days.   Still a memorable occasion after many years.  

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2 hours ago, SMOKER 1 said:

I may be wrong and predidice but I can't help it. My Mom lost her youngest brother at Pearl Harbor. In my eyes those damn japs took away my ever knowing him. Then a few years ago when we visited Pearl Harbor in the morning and when they played the national anthem the orientals paid no attention and didn't even remove their hats. Their kids were running wild while they screamed at them. The true americans stopped removed hats and all stood at attention. Even when they boated us out to the Arizona the orientals didn't pay any attention to what was going on and were jerking off. I was really pi$$ed and had to bite my tongue to keep from getting into a fight. I'm sorry but I just can't forgive the japs for what they done!!

jerry

Smoker, Probably most of those Asians you saw were Chinese and perhaps some Japanese tourists as the local population would not have a reason to be there. They don't have the same sense of tragedy as we have. On the other hand the Americans of Japanese descent who live on the islands suffered under under the same attack. Many went on to fight in the European theater.

Holding on to hate for what peoples long dead ancestors did doesn't make sense. It's like those who want to make restitution payments for slavery.  - Wait, what? You are holding a grudge against long dead folks for what they did to your long dead ancestors? Doesn't make sense, does it.

Holding a grudge against German solders of WWII? Why? They were doing what was their duty as were Japanese solders. Japanese solders were taught hate; that they were superior and should have no concern about killing inferiors.

Palestinian kids are being taught the same.

Are you teaching your kids to hate someone who had nothing to do with the attack of December 7th?

Everyone's ancestors were crapped upon by someone at some time in the past. My ancestors ended up in the US due to the fact they were starving when the potato crop failed. There was plenty of other food, grains, etc. but it belonged to the English landowners. Should I hate the English? NO WAY! I ended up in the best country in the world because of it.

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