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Hot Magnum

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Son sent pics from home of the neighbors 315 magnum getting a little hot under the hood last night. Apparently it had been setting for several days outside and just ignited about 5 yesterday. He said smoke from tires could be seen 20 miles away. 

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My brother in laws burned a few years ago hooked to a grain cart. Same thing. Just sitting there. He was told there are some wiring issues under the cab. He said the worst thing was is his billfold with licence, cash ect. was still in it. 

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Damn Jerry 😳 I don't think that ones going to buff out !!

Danny

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Might be able to save the wheel weights.

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Were the loan papers in the cab......

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Yikes,  don’t know that I’ve ever seen one quite that bad

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I don't know for sure, but with that amount of wiring, they may just want to use a new harness instead of splicing when they rebuild that one:ph34r:

Ross

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50,000 miles of wire, I am surprised more don't burn. I'll keep my old ones.

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That is why I like battery isolators, the last place you want them to catch fire is in a shed.

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Since you guys are saying these TierIVa Magnums are burning up just sitting without running, I might bring attention to something I have noticed on several of them. Most TierIVa large chassis Magnums came with battery disconnects, which is located at the LF corner of the cab. What I have noticed is that the cables to/from the switch lay on top of the frame for the cab steps, and as they age the frame rubs through the insulation for the cables, which can cause bare battery cables, causing a potential catastrophic situation. The one cable is always “battery hot” regardless of battery disconnect position, so the battery disconnect is not a guarantee for eliminating fire risk, either. This is a newer blue Magnum I have in the shop. In a few years those cables will have the black sheathing rubbed through, leaving only the cable insulation to protect the cable. 

In all honesty, after dealing with battery disconnects for several years, I like them less and less as time goes on. They cause a lot of poor start/no start issues when the contacts inside get corroded over time; they cause DEF system problems when guys shut them off before the system has fully evacuated(not good in the wintertime); and they just cause more battery cabling to/from the switch to have more problems with cables rubbing through somewhere. If you are going to park a newer machine in a machine shed for a long time, make the extra effort to remove the negative battery cables from the batteries....it just might save your entire machine shed’s worth of equipment. 

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7 hours ago, SDman said:

Since you guys are saying these TierIVa Magnums are burning up just sitting without running, I might bring attention to something I have noticed on several of them. Most TierIVa large chassis Magnums came with battery disconnects, which is located at the LF corner of the cab. What I have noticed is that the cables to/from the switch lay on top of the frame for the cab steps, and as they age the frame rubs through the insulation for the cables, which can cause bare battery cables, causing a potential catastrophic situation. The one cable is always “battery hot” regardless of battery disconnect position, so the battery disconnect is not a guarantee for eliminating fire risk, either. This is a newer blue Magnum I have in the shop. In a few years those cables will have the black sheathing rubbed through, leaving only the cable insulation to protect the cable. 

In all honesty, after dealing with battery disconnects for several years, I like them less and less as time goes on. They cause a lot of poor start/no start issues when the contacts inside get corroded over time; they cause DEF system problems when guys shut them off before the system has fully evacuated(not good in the wintertime); and they just cause more battery cabling to/from the switch to have more problems with cables rubbing through somewhere. If you are going to park a newer machine in a machine shed for a long time, make the extra effort to remove the negative battery cables from the batteries....it just might save your entire machine shed’s worth of equipment. 

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You think  of all the shop shed combos built. And if the guy has livestock the loader tractor usually dirty sits inside. Anything can cause a fire but what a disaster burn every piece of major machinery your tools and usually a few toys all in a short time.

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Dale, you are absolutely right. All these "Garage Mahals" that farmers have built in the last 10-20 years to house all of their equipment under one roof brings new meaning to the phrase "putting all your eggs in one basket". Easy to put $1 million's worth of equipment in one place under one roof anymore. And another thing I have noticed in the last 5-10 years is the uptick in high$$$ machinery that starts on fire without being operated for a few days. Every time we come out with a new piece of equipment, its got more electrical bells and whistles than the model it replaces. We had an operation about 15 miles south of here that lost all their cattle feeding equipment last winter due to a building fire. The irony? They housed the fire fighting equipment for the southern half of our county's rural fire department in that building, too . Everything was lost. 

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This fire thread hits home to me. On may 5th my son and I lost our seed for the year, dads planter and a seed tender to a massive fire in a 60x170 morton bulding at the neighbors a half mile away that burned to the ground. It started fast. We had just been there a half hour before the people that lived in the house called and said there was a fire. When we got there flames were already through the roof in the middle of the building. There was a 1370 and a 3500 kinze planter right there where eveyone saw the flames first. We figure it about had to be that tractor that started it. It was so far gone that the 3 fire investigators couldnt figure out what caused it. Moral of the story is. #1, I would not ever want living quarters in my shed. That one went so fast and so hot if it had been in the night while someone was asleep proabably wouldnt have made it out. #2 Its not a bad idea to store machinery separate from shop and other stuff. I no longer want our seed in the same shed as machinery. #3 and as much as I think of my machinery a couple days after the fire I told dad I dont feel so bad about seeing my stuff set outside now. This deal is something I will never forget. I still wake up in the night with night mares over seeing it. I also think it pays to de clutter. That shed had so much stuff in it that was just there. Adding to the fire was a huge stack of spare tires from old vehicles. Also there was a car trailer that had been set up for a field/service trailer with a pickup fuel barrel on it. After the fire it had seams opend up so far you could stick your fist in the holes. I even question my bulk oil storage in the shop now. One more thing to add heat to a fire if it ever happned. Even paint. Feel like it ought to be out of the shop. This ordeal really made me take a look at what our own shop had in it. I get first hand now how soldiers get PTSD. I think I may have a mild form of it now. All the stuff blowing up in there during the fire and the intense heat and smoke and watching something go down that has been around for 40 some years. All scrap now.

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Tractors, combines, all colors burn. Seen the remnants of green and blue around here also.

Thee most important thing to do is keep things insured well. Uncle had a fire in 1999. About all his machinery was in the Morton. Pretty much put him out of business overnight. Things including the building he said could have been insured better. He was 59 and decided to rent it out instead of going in debt buying machinery at his age. He always liked carpentry work,  so he and a friend started they're own carpentry business. They kept super busy with that till around 5 years ago when he retired.

 

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