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Cotton Patch . . . A Cotton Thread


Fred B

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7 hours ago, Fred B said:

NY Bill, thanks for adding the photos.  Very nice.  To my knowledge there is no red picker operating in my county.  (I have two of the red ones sitting at my house but my son deems them too slow, they are only four rows.)  At one time there were very few John Deere pickers -- now there are no red pickers.  Almost everyone within the last 5 or 6 years have gone to the John Deere round baler type pickers.  

 

I think my friend said that CIH doesn't make a roll baler type picker. that surprised me.

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Great picture Fred--------gotta give you a feeling of satisfaction. ?

*****

I don't believe Case/IH have ever produced a round bale picker------maybe a proto type (experimental model somewhere??).

John Deere is the predominant cotton picker here in the Delta.  Combines and tractors are roughly split 50-50.

 

 

DD

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Just now, Delta Dirt said:

Great picture Fred--------gotta give you a feeling of satisfaction. ?

*****

I don't believe Case/IH have ever produced a round bale picker------maybe a proto type (experimental model somewhere??).

John Deere is the predominant cotton picker here in the Delta.  Combines and tractors are roughly split 50-50.

 

 

DD

Anson,

Was thinking i and a buddie went online and found case ih pics of a red round baler picker. Maybe it was a prototype idk. But since my buddie and i work in manufacturing and the new at the time jd baler was all the buzz we were looking at the competition. You down south guys know more than i would im sure. I am curious tho if they made one or it was just online propaganda so to speak...

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caseih made a picker that made regular modules, on board, (but 1/2 as long), problem was , you had to stop and back up a little, and then eject the finished module where it was,  and then manually tarp it, you had to furnish your own tarp, (the gin furnishes full size (32') tarps). (with deer you furnish the plastic wrap, with custom harvester the wrap adds $.02 ,# to harvest price over regular full size module).   it didn't have an accumulator ,like the deer, to store a little cotton while the bale is being ejected, deer you never stop.  (john deer makes 1/4 size round modules, and can carry 1 finished module with it to the end of the row, and then drop it, wherever you want. with deer you have to have a separate tractor, with 4k, to 20k bale pickup tongs, forks, spikes, ect.( it's almost unbelievable the costly and fancy apparatus they come up with to move bales)  to line up 4 round bales in a row for module truck to pick up. module truck can pick up and haul 2, 1/2 size (16') at a time. (truck has to go in field, and round (errrr... rectangle) them up).         the gist of the situation is which would you rather do, tarp 1/2 size modules in the hot sun, or ride around in an AC tractor, and line up 1/4 size modules.   actually  that's not the end of it  the ih is supposed to do a better picking job, because it picks from both sides of the row, but they are harder to service, and clean, at the end of the day.      the deer can be programmed to print all information w/ bar code on round bale wrap. i understand they are trouble & fire (here they burn about 1 machine per year) prone.  the deer looses less cotton in the baling process. i understand you can still buy an ih picker, but you have to pay for it before they build it.  

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The Perils of Round Cotton Modules

https://www.kristv.com/news/local-news/farmers-are-offering-cash-reward-for-help

Well, we now have a new peril when using a JD round module cotton picker.  It seems some sorry local punks with too much welfare at home are going at night and cutting round cotton modules open, just to watch them explode. (in the video the news anchor calls them bales).    Apparently the round cotton modules are under pressure and when you cut the plastic wrap they open with a little force.  This happened in San Patricio county, to my North.  Last week some of that punk type got caught after they kicked in windshields in several autos in Corpus Christi.  

 

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We had a case of cutting the plastic wrap on modules here in the Delta last fall.  Have forgotten where-----am thinking Sunflower County, Mississippi.

Don't know if they ever caught the culprit or not.

I can find out more details if the Texas sheriff department would like------put the two sheriff departments together???

 

DD

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6 hours ago, Fred B said:

Well, we now have a new peril when using a JD round module cotton picker.  It seems some sorry local punks with too much welfare at home are going at night and cutting round cotton modules open, just to watch them explode.

They were talking about that problem on a facebook group l'm in. Then someone posted this reward poster last night. And Fred B, you;re right. lt is aggravating when they call the round modules "round bales". But what is even worse is when they can't even spell it right....lol 

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Anson, Thanks for the thought.   Our lawmen here are pretty sure that it is local punks doing the damage.   The reward money should cause some of their cousins/friends to turn them in.  I'm sure they are bragging about doing it, maybe even took videos. 

2stepn, Thanks, actually it's possible the industry still hasn't settled on a correct name.  I looked back and see even I'm guilty of putting the word bales in there a couple of times, but in my defense, at least I did spell it correctly.  ? 

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6 hours ago, ihrondiesel said:

Fred , Anson, and others—for those of us who don’t know any more about cotton than picking out a T-shirt, how does the module builder work?

Think of it as a hay baler. I believe it was here Fred had a picture or at least a link to older thread with more pictures.

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7 hours ago, ihrondiesel said:

Fred , Anson, and others—for those of us who don’t know any more about cotton than picking out a T-shirt, how does the module builder work?

I had pictures of a module builder at the bottom of the first page on this thread. cotton is dumped into it, the cotton is spread out evenly the length of it, and the top of the builder squashes the whole bunch of cotton down, then raises for the next cart, to repeat until it is the correct size module. then, the back of the builder opens so it can be pulled away, and the tarp put on.  (Fred, how did this dairy farmer do in explaining the process?)

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Bill, you did a good job. 

The builder is 8' wide at the top and sharply angles to 6' wide, then angles to 7' wide at the bottom.  The tramper is powered by a hydraulic ram (cylinder). the tramper is 6' x 2' wide and the operator forces it down in about 3' increments from front to back.  The builder is 32' long at the bottom.  The tramper is on a carriage powered by a hydraulic motor with roller chains running along each  side that move it along the top of the builder from front to back, then back to front.  Cotton is compressed til it can't hold anymore (judgment call).  The builder is tapered and sits on the ground.  Tractor lowers builder's  wheels with hydraulic cylinders.  Front of builder is on 3 pt draft arms, and raises also.  So being tapered it releases itself from the cotton.  You open the back door and pull forward.  Tarps are open at the front, closed in back and users have put grounding welding clamps on the back bottom of the door and clamp on the tarp.  As the builder pulls forward, the tarp is drug over the module, till it pulls loose from the tarp. tarp is then tied in front.

Module truck bed tips down, and has live chains with cleats in the floor that go forward same speed as truck goes backward, loading module without breaking it apart.(module is actually standing still as i'ts being loaded).  Seems like Heston had a hay system that was very similar some years ago.  

The John Deere round 1/4 size module are patterned after the Vermeer round hay baler started 30+/- years ago with much modification.  

There are several you tube videos that also explains it.  Just plug in how a cotton module builder works. 

If I remember correctly they were first developed in 1972.  (We started using one in about 1977) When they first came out they had the cart ahead of the horse.  The first modules were made to put on metal pallets and then they used tilt bed trailers with rollers built into the floor and the loaded pallet would be winched up onto the trailer and taken to the gin and dropped off.  So you had to have a pallet for each individual module.  A few years later they developed the truck with the chains in the floor to load the modules without using the pallets.  

I do not use a boll buggy (cotton cart) as it requires another tractor, operator, ac maintenance, and you loose cotton each time cotton is transferred .               Fred

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The boll buggy is equivalent to a grain cart.  Picker dumps into boll buggy (cart)-------boll buggy transfers to module builder.

The 32 ft modules will average approximately 16 bales over here in the Delta.

The 1/2 size modules made by the later Case/IH will run 14--16 bales;   and the round modules produced by the J-D self contained picker and module picker average 4 bales per round module.

The J-D round module picker is the most predominant picker here in the Delta now.  Builds the cotton module on the go similar to a round hay baler-------can carry one on the rear until you want to dump.  Module truck picks up 4 round modules (16 bales) at  a time.   Very proficient operation--------cuts out several operations an men.

I liked Fred's statement about losing some cotton everytime it is handled.  No doubt-------lose a little here and a little there and it adds up at the end of a day.

 

DD

 

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Anson thanks for clearing the bales per module up. i should have done that. we have so much wind here, we only average 14&1/2 bales per module, if we try to make them bigger, we lose cotton to the wind.       funny you  mentioned a grain cart, the latest thing is to convert a cotton module builder to a turn row grain  storage bin, for when the trucks don't get back in time. probably works out good, with the lifting wheels, so it can sit on the ground.   then it will be filled with a grain cart.  for a while there everyone and their dog was making builders, there was a co. making them in corpus christi tx.

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Grain storage would be a good use for module builder.  Over here------lots of them have been hauled to the scrap yard.

Along those lines------a neighbor has a portable grain bin made similar to a module builder that holds 4,000----4,000 bushels.  Dumps into when they are out of trucks.

Keeping enough trucks for these big new combines is an ordeal.  Higher yielding crops and higher capacity machines = MORE TRUCKS in a hurry.

******

I see I made an error in the earlier post on bales per module for the late Case/IH pickers.  They make a 1/2 size module which holds approximately 6--8 bales. (have never been around one in the field)

 

DD

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https://www.kristv.com/news/local-news/two-men-arrested-in-san-patricio-county-cotton-bales-vandalism-case

Saw this on yesterday's news.  Look like they caught at least two of the punks that were cutting the round module wraps.  

Of course another problem arose at the same time with apparently unexplained fire in the modules.  

https://www.kristv.com/news/local-news/three-hundred-and-twenty-bales-catch-fire

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Note:  This was meant to be posted September 14, 2019.  Had trouble with computer and getting on site. 

Went to a seminar/Remembrance of the 1919 hurricane at the Corpus Christi, TX Museum of Science and History.

100 years ago on this date, a large, unexpected hurricane hit Corpus Christi, TX. 500-750 people died. There were bales of cotton on the wharves at the seaport of Corpus Christi. The storm and resulting tidal surge used the cotton bales as battering rams and broke open wood stave tanks of petroleum oil. The oil coated almost everything.  There was lumber scattered in the streets from broken, destroyed homes and structures. The city let the word out that anyone could pick up the lumber in the streets. My father was visiting his uncle after the storm. He said his uncle (my great uncle) picked up some of the lumber, he used it to finish an inside wall on his barn.  

Here are current photos of the barn and of the interior wall with oil stained lumber. The lumber is random – 1 x 6 beaded, 1 x 12 flat, not milled, 1 x 6 door jams, etc., some with bent over nails still in it. My Dad bought the farm with barn and house several years later. (Dad built a new brick home in 1965). I now own the farm today.  Thought it might be interesting.  As it turns out, cotton bales by themselves can do damage also.  

Cotton bales and debris in the streets of Corpus Christi, TX:

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Lumber scattered in the streets, Corpus Christi Bay, looking East, in background: cleanup crews at work.

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Old barn as it is today, well over 100 years old:

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Another current view of the barn.  Full of dry wood termites, not long for the world, however, it has withstood all the storms since early 1900s. 

Originally shingle roof.  This v groove sheet metal has been on since 1941:

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Horizontal lumber, oil coated, from streets of Corpus Christi, 9-14-1919:

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I was surprised when I got to the museum/seminar, right next to the seating was this 1948 Farmall H with its history card.  As it turns out my dad knew the Poenisch family well.  He told me years ago about a time when he harvested grain sorghum for them one year.  He said he was working with a two row drag type combine near the bay on Ocean Drive.  He said the combine was old and kept giving problems and he joked he was tempted to back the @#%$*& thing over a high bluff into the bay.  He also was pals with one of their sons.   

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This family must have owned about four miles of bayfront property.  Today this area has some of the most expensive homes in the city.  

Here is a photo of a book on Corpus showing a pile of lumber from the storm.  They were charging, seems like, $20 per truck load to haul it off after the city had it piled.  

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There are several books written on this 1919 storm.  It's also known as the Florida storm because it came through the Florida keys first.  If I remember correctly, it's said the storm sunk 11 ships on its way.  When it entered the Gulf of Mexico they lost track of the storm.  That's why Corpus Christi was not prepared.  

Other interesting books on this storm can be found by looking up Murphy Givens/Jim Maloney and Mary Jo O'Rear.  

 

 

I am unable to delete these duplicate photos below.  Not sure how they even got in.  

 

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twostepn,

This is my home place.  I grew up here.  The barn and old house I grew up in were moved once with a steam tractor.  Here is an earlier photo of the barn.  There is really nothing special about the old barn except it is the only one I know of any where in South Texas with a gambrel style roof. The photo of the loft, I stuck the camera up thru a rotten floor board and clicked.  We used to stored baled hay up there.  There is a trap door and ladder to access it from the middle room.  Don't know how old it is, was on the place when Dad's uncle bought it.  Dad's uncle is the one that had the house and barn moved to a higher ground location.  That is a Letz feed mill, still there today.  My brothers, some of Dad's hands, and I put many a bundle of Hegira (a tall grain sorghum type for cattle feed) thru the feed mill, belted to a CC, or DC Case, or H or M Farmall.  This photo below is from before Hurricane Celia hit August 3, 1970.  We had removed the fan and tail from the windmill before the storm.   Dad did add an open shed to the south side of the barn which Hurricane Celia in 1970 removed.  

In 1970 there were still free range chickens on the place, consequently, no foliage.  Of course we didn't know at the time they were free range.  We just thot that was normal.  they did have their own house though. 

I probably didn't give correct info earlier on the 1919 storm.  You can just put in 1919 storm Corpus Christi, Texas and many photos and information will come up.  

Fred

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  • 2 months later...

55 and 100 year old tractors.

I displayed these two tractors at my church Oktoberfest this year. I acquired them earlier this year. The 504 I found at the tractor show I go to every October. It is a 1964. So it's 55 years old. It's a gasoline and runs good. Nice size for a small farm. Also the 504 was available to mount a cotton picker. Actually it kind of looks like a miniature 1456. The 1919 Twin City 12-20 is 100 years old this year. This nice thought out tractor appears to be ahead of its time. The Twin City people are calling it an early engineered tractor. The thought is it was on a drawing board in 1915, by late 1917 prototypes were working in the fields. By mid 1918 some were sold and in the wheat harvest that year. Although they are recognized as 1919 introduction year. It has four valves per cylinder, two exhausts, two intakes with twin camshafts, gear type engine oil pump, with drilled pressure lubed counter weighted crankshaft. It has exhaust and intake cross flow induction. It has a water pump with thermostat. It has unit frame with fully enclosed sliding gear transmission and final drive running in oil. 4-1/4 x 6 inch bore and stroke for 340 ci running at 1,000 rpm. In 1926 it was upgraded with only carburetor upgrade? to 17-28 and built to 1936. Weight was 5,000 pounds. In 1920 they doubled this tractor in size to a 20-35. And again in 1926 upgraded to a 27-44. It had 5-1/2 x 6-3/4 inch bore and stroke for 641 ci. Both tractors basic design inline vertical four cylinder. They had a twin disc clutch with a foot operated pedal with two pads. (Push forward on the top pad to engage clutch, push down on the bottom pad to disengage.)

Not all the features lived past these models.

There was a dealer for these tractors in Corpus Christi, Texas.


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Fred, l really like that 504. Neat looking tractor. l have a pic of a picker mounted on one and also a pic of a stripper on one. And if you're interested, l've got a couple of pics of a Twin City tractor like yours plowing some cotton ground here on the south plains. l'll just have to dig for them because they're buried on another aux drive....lol 

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Mike,  That 4 row picker you show is a little newer than the two I have here that I don't use anymore, one of these has a 466 and one a CDC 504.  Actually there is a third with a bad 504 engine.  To my knowledge there are no IH pickers working in my county.  There may be some working in San Patricio County adjoining to my north.  

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