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nelson jr

Sorghum Sudan baleage?

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Usually just green chop and feed, but have been thinking baling and wet wrapping would get better regrowth and overall tonnage.  Anybody making baleage?  How are you going about it? And how long do you let them sit before feeding?

I have been reading about this on line, but would like to hear from guys doing it first hand.

Thanks for your time.

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We make baleage with it. Make sure its dry enough before baling. Makes very good feed. 

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We are gonna do about 50 acres of it this summer since the winter kill got all of our alfalfa. I last did this crop about 6-7 years ago so I have to draw on some old memories.

We try to cut at about 3 feet tall. If it gets too tall (which doesn't take much if you hit a warm wet spell) it gets real tough and is almost impossible to get dry enough to bale.

I plan on cutting it and then hitting it with the tedder a day later to help it dry. I have rollers in my discbine and my neighbor has flail conditioners and I think this is going to be the crop that settles our ongoing discussion about which method helps dry the crop better.

My bales won't be fed until winter so they'll have plenty of time to ensile in the line. I'd think a couple weeks to a month would be enough though.

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First year growing it here. I’m the same I’ve read guys leave it lay for days to silage bale it. Read where one guy left it lay for 2 weeks to dry bale. Lol. My plan is to cut it with discbine and crimp it as much as possible ( within machines capacity) and give myself a couple days to dry. I will then collect a sample and use the microwave method of moisture testing. Once it’s down under 60% it’s go time. It’s my experience with baleage in general it’s better wet than dry on your 20-60% range. 50% is ideal. With grass hay you start baling at 60% and before your done it’s already down to 30%. I expect Sudan to be a little more forgiving as everyone says it dries slow. 

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jesse do you plan on planting the sorghum sudan into the winterkilled hayfields? and if so are you going to plow them first or no till? thanks

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we have been doing it for 10 years >

always notill    spray for weeds/kill first    + will be  trying 8 ac into poor alfalfa  after 1st cut  will be in shock and clover doesn't go over 1'

try to cut at 3' and then every 30 d, will go to 8' fast if it gets rain delay

depending on past/future weather cut and lay for 6 -18 hours   if too wet will wrap on rolls otherwise <40% they start to waste it

generally  our haylage is cut /wrapped with in 10 hours

tailings feed day of   or + 30d -8 months  never tried to any longer as something will get in

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40 minutes ago, pt756 said:

jesse do you plan on planting the sorghum sudan into the winterkilled hayfields? and if so are you going to plow them first or no till? thanks

We had to go back to the drawing board with our crops after seeing what mother nature did to us over winter.

We took all the hay fields that were too far gone and burnt them down with round up and no tilled corn into them. Beans went into old corn fields where we could get into them. Since it was so wet this spring we had plenty of fields/portions of fields that didn't get planted with corn/beans. Last week it dried out enough to get into some of those areas so we disked down the stubble and planted Sudan since we are going to need the forage. A discussion was had about claiming Prevent Planting those acres but that put us at not being able to plant the sudan grass until after 8-1 and not being able to harvest anything until after 11-1. Given the weather we've had it was too risky to go this route. Getting three cuttings or more of the forage was more important than the Gov't check on these acres.

I do not have a no till drill capable of doing these kinds of seeds otherwise I would have burnt down the hay field and planted right into it. I had thoughts about interseeding the hay fields with sudan grass just to see how it would do if I could get access to a no till drill, but the wet spring allowed the weeds and grass to get too far ahead for that.

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I always allow it to wilt after mowing, depends on weather of course but 2 days is usually what I did. cut it at 2-3 ft , as said in another comment it gets stemy the taller it gets an seems to come back quicker cut at that height. There’s a brown mid rib that’s higher quality forage too, higher energy levels that makes a good forage substitute. 

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Planted some bmr6 last year, you don't  want it to get over say 6 foot, goes down easier  than regular sorghum.  I wasn't  necessarily planning on letting it get that big, but it did and down it went.

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Isn’t there something about some acid or nitrates or something that becomes an issue?

 

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1 minute ago, Bdse25 said:

Isn’t there something about some acid or nitrates or something that becomes an issue?

 

that say it can occur when frosted,gets dark,  for grazing....? but they say it will grow out 10-14 days if still growing.....and baleage is slightly different

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4 minutes ago, mmi said:

that say it can occur when frosted,gets dark,  for grazing....? but they say it will grow out 10-14 days if still growing.....and baleage is slightly different

Oh ok.  So I guess you don’t have to worry about it until the last cutting then. Does it winter kill easy or can it take a frost?

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Prussic acid, if you are going to plant it and graze or chop I heavily suggest you read up on the dangers associated with feeding it.  Nitrates can also be a problem at times.

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On 6/13/2019 at 4:24 AM, nelson jr said:

Prussic acid, if you are going to plant it and graze or chop I heavily suggest you read up on the dangers associated with feeding it.  Nitrates can also be a problem at times.

X2. Nothing that can't be overcome. Silage in fact mostly eliminates the issue. But it still can be a problem. 

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