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696IH

Biiiiig seeding rig in NSW Australia

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Found this on YouTube this morning, I thought the neighbors new 76' Bourgault was big..... 

 

t

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What width swath is he covering??

Impressive------big rig-------huge fields.

Presume they are seeding wheat?

 

DD

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214 ft I believe. The tractor is Aus made Baldwin which I believe has been repowered with a Cummins QSK19 turned up to 800hp, the air carts are Aus made Simplicity 18000L and I think the bar is made by Multi farming systems with the tynes at 15” spacing.

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Youtube description says it plants a hectare (2.471 acres) per minute.  That calculates out to 164 acres / hour if I did my math right.

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7 minutes ago, Steve C. said:

Youtube description says it plants a hectare (2.471 acres) per minute.  That calculates out to 164 acres / hour if I did my math right.

I get 148 per hour which is about 5 times more then one of our 60ft drills.

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8 minutes ago, Steve C. said:

Youtube description says it plants a hectare (2.471 acres) per minute.  That calculates out to 164 acres / hour if I did my math right.

Yep boss and I could put the whole program in 48 hrs with that.....

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3 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

I get 148 per hour which is about 5 times more then one of our 60ft drills.

How fast you going? We’re doing 35-40 ac hr with 54’ @ 5-6 mi/hr

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6 minutes ago, 696IH said:

How fast you going? We’re doing 35-40 ac hr with 54’ @ 5-6 mi/hr

4.6 mph

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19 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

4.6 mph

Same speed I am going with 33 ft. But the guys with 50 and 60 ft and big hp are going 5 to 6.5 mph.

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1 minute ago, dale560 said:

Same speed I am going with 33 ft. But the guys with 50 and 60 ft and big hp are going 5 to 6.5 mph.

We will go 5 mph if we are way behind and in really mellow rock free soils which is a rarity around these parts.  Hp is not the limiting factor for us.  Its these two things.  Our air drills are 7.5" spacing and going too fast throws up too much dirt for my likening.  Secondly, I like to keep the drills in one piece.  On dry years guys will break shanks off of drills and I'm talking these 550-650 lb shanks on JD and FC drills.  That is how hard our ground can get and I've been down to 3.5 mph in those conditions.  Now on our disc drill I have gone up to 6 mph just for the heck of it, but I don't like the way the discs start bouncing at that speed.  It just comes down to wanting to go slow so the seeder and drill does the job correctly.  Our area is unforgiving.  You have to actually put the seed in the ground with some soil on top of it with a some packing.  If you go too deep, it might crust over and not come up.  Too shallow the seed might lay in the dry dirt until the next rain which might not come.  I know there are areas that all you have to do is throw it over your shoulder and it will grow.  I have a bunch of brochures on seeding equipment and they all show these drills operating in nice black rock free flat fields.  I wish they would test some of that stuff out on our farm, it would open their eyes. 

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21 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

We will go 5 mph if we are way behind and in really mellow rock free soils which is a rarity around these parts.  Hp is not the limiting factor for us.  Its these two things.  Our air drills are 7.5" spacing and going too fast throws up too much dirt for my likening.  Secondly, I like to keep the drills in one piece.  On dry years guys will break shanks off of drills and I'm talking these 550-650 lb shanks on JD and FC drills.  That is how hard our ground can get and I've been down to 3.5 mph in those conditions.  Now on our disc drill I have gone up to 6 mph just for the heck of it, but I don't like the way the discs start bouncing at that speed.  It just comes down to wanting to go slow so the seeder and drill does the job correctly.  Our area is unforgiving.  You have to actually put the seed in the ground with some soil on top of it with a some packing.  If you go too deep, it might crust over and not come up.  Too shallow the seed might lay in the dry dirt until the next rain which might not come.  I know there are areas that all you have to do is throw it over your shoulder and it will grow.  I have a bunch of brochures on seeding equipment and they all show these drills operating in nice black rock free flat fields.  I wish they would test some of that stuff out on our farm, it would open their eyes. 

Same here we seed about a 1000 acres that is pretty rocky. Usually knock off about 4 to 8 Dutch opener points a year and usually ruin a couple openers if you don’t catch it. Had a guy seed for us on some land we don’t rent any more . 60 ft 1890 drill flat and smooth sandy land 8.8 mph he was seeding with a 9520 track machine. Years ago when dad owned the land we are renting now. He wanted no brain hired man to seed a couple rounds around 320 acre field. In 3 rounds he broke 27 cast iron drill shoes on a 28 ft set of 620s from hitting rocks at speed. We had to pull all the shoes of a 100 14 ft to fix the drill. He seeded 25 acres I seeded the other 290 didn’t break one. He was 45 I was 15 years old . I seeded it 2 nights after school bus dropped me off. Then the next year I was seeding same spot. Dad went to get more wheat seed put the night in at the bar before coming home.next morning  He tipped the truck onto the drills with a full load of seed.again dad was 47 at the time I was 16 but it was my fault because drills were in wrong spot.

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4 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Same here we seed about a 1000 acres that is pretty rocky. Usually knock off about 4 to 8 Dutch opener points a year and usually ruin a couple openers if you don’t catch it.

I ruined three boots so far this year because the point got knocked off and didn't catch it in time.  My uncle backed into his own pickup with one of drills one spring.  Our two air drills are TBT tanks.  Whenever he stops in the middle of the field he always likes to back the drill up 10ft or so and then drop it in the ground so there is no gap.  One time we got rained out and he went back the next day and parked his pickup right behind the drill so it would be out of the way.  Got in the tractor and forgot what he was doing and starting backing up.  The right transport wheel/arm caught his pickup in the drivers side door and he backed up far enough to where it almost rolled the pickup on its side before he noticed it. 

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Would like to add it looks like in the field on the video you could go any speed you want.  Flat, no rocks, doesn't look hard, wide spacing.  There is a local farmer around here that built a air drill similar to this one.  Only half the width but used two tanks just like in the video.  Pulled it with his Rite tractor. 

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

Same speed I am going with 33 ft. But the guys with 50 and 60 ft and big hp are going 5 to 6.5 mph.

We're only pulling 28' and going that fast. The 9130 will pull at 7 mph but then the seed is all over the place. A few years back they were really saying on the farm shows and radio to stay under 5 mph when seeding canola. The wheat bounces around enough at higher speeds, never mind a little seed like canola. Most guys with the big drill that I know are only going 4.5 mph. Bigger drill and slower speed gets just as much done but leaves a much nicer and more uniform seed bed

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That's pretty impressive. 214 ft would finish some of our fields off in one pass lol. I wonder how many acres to a fill he is getting with that unit

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58 minutes ago, db1486 said:

That's pretty impressive. 214 ft would finish some of our fields off in one pass lol. I wonder how many acres to a fill he is getting with that unit

I know the 60 ft Horch Anderson guys with big tank seeding wheat and double 1450 nh3 tanks do 105 acres a fill. We do around 45 with our 200 bushel concord and single nh3 tank. Soybeans the JD guys do a 185 acres with a 450 triple tank setup and 43 ft drill.

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11 minutes ago, dale560 said:

I know the 60 ft Horch Anderson guys with big tank seeding wheat and double 1450 nh3 tanks do 105 acres a fill. We do around 45 with our 200 bushel concord and single nh3 tank. Soybeans the JD guys do a 185 acres with a 450 triple tank setup and 43 ft drill.

Those are decent numbers for the one pass guys.  We only put down starter fertilizer during seeding for various reasons.  Rest of the N comes later if needed.  Normally on small grains we get between 130 to 160 acres per load just with a 430 bu tank depending on the rates.  This year we set up the drill I pull for liquid starter so now I can fill the whole cart up with seed only fill it and the fert cart once a day.  Can get north of 300 acres pretty easy now.  

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52 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

Those are decent numbers for the one pass guys.  We only put down starter fertilizer during seeding for various reasons.  Rest of the N comes later if needed.  Normally on small grains we get between 130 to 160 acres per load just with a 430 bu tank depending on the rates.  This year we set up the drill I pull for liquid starter so now I can fill the whole cart up with seed only fill it and the fert cart once a day.  Can get north of 300 acres pretty easy now.  

Guys up here use liquid , urea or nh3. Most do a one pass but more guys are going to a fert pass in fall or spring. Myself nh3 works well. We have 4 tanks one set of doubles and 2 singles. I usually come out check the cows early in the morning and pull a empty to town and leave it. I will grab the full one that I left before or come back at 3 :OO pm to get little guy from preschool and shuttle more tanks. If I have 2 to 3 tanks a day it keeps me busy and I have to stop to feed cattle at night also. The only thing about urea is twice as much physical product as nh3 and liquid would be 4 times more but liquid you could mix all micro nutrients in easily as most formulations have them already

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think they would have ripped that tree out that is at the 5min mark

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21 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

We will go 5 mph if we are way behind and in really mellow rock free soils which is a rarity around these parts.  Hp is not the limiting factor for us.  Its these two things.  Our air drills are 7.5" spacing and going too fast throws up too much dirt for my likening.  Secondly, I like to keep the drills in one piece.  On dry years guys will break shanks off of drills and I'm talking these 550-650 lb shanks on JD and FC drills.  That is how hard our ground can get and I've been down to 3.5 mph in those conditions.  Now on our disc drill I have gone up to 6 mph just for the heck of it, but I don't like the way the discs start bouncing at that speed.  It just comes down to wanting to go slow so the seeder and drill does the job correctly.  Our area is unforgiving.  You have to actually put the seed in the ground with some soil on top of it with a some packing.  If you go too deep, it might crust over and not come up.  Too shallow the seed might lay in the dry dirt until the next rain which might not come.  I know there are areas that all you have to do is throw it over your shoulder and it will grow.  I have a bunch of brochures on seeding equipment and they all show these drills operating in nice black rock free flat fields.  I wish they would test some of that stuff out on our farm, it would open their eyes. 

Was a dry start to last season to the point that the state of Western Australia  ran out of Flexicoil 550lb shanks and getting the U bolts was a challenge as well. Don’t know how the other manufacturers went. 

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last season 1 dealer sold 800 flexicoil shanks

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1 hour ago, ozfarm said:

last season 1 dealer sold 800 flexicoil shanks

You guys run flexicoil a lot down there? They were almost 1/2 the airseeders up here in North Dakota now they have a left for John Deere. 

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

You guys run flexicoil a lot down there? They were almost 1/2 the airseeders up here in North Dakota now they have a left for John Deere. 

Around here I would say it was more then half back in the day.  Flexi Coil really had the first successful air drill that would work around here.  However, its rare to see a new FC today and the ones left are getting turned into different colors.  One year I counted 13 FCs on the JD lot.  Then course Torgersons is pushing Bourgault over FC and that doesn't help.

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On ‎5‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 12:41 PM, dale560 said:

Guys up here use liquid , urea or nh3. Most do a one pass but more guys are going to a fert pass in fall or spring. Myself nh3 works well. We have 4 tanks one set of doubles and 2 singles. I usually come out check the cows early in the morning and pull a empty to town and leave it. I will grab the full one that I left before or come back at 3 :OO pm to get little guy from preschool and shuttle more tanks. If I have 2 to 3 tanks a day it keeps me busy and I have to stop to feed cattle at night also. The only thing about urea is twice as much physical product as nh3 and liquid would be 4 times more but liquid you could mix all micro nutrients in easily as most formulations have them already

Some guys do one pass seeding, some are like us, and some go back and forth.  Some use liquid for topdressing, others use urea.  You can't get NH3 around here and I'm not sure you can get it anywhere in the state.  We've used both 32-0-0 and urea.  Although I like liquid better from an agronomy standpoint, lately we've just stuck with urea.  Its cheaper and goes on faster.  I have a neighbor that prefers liquid top dress and we do it for him every year.  One year I compared what he paid for the liquid vs what it would have been if it was urea and the difference was $50,000 more for the liquid.  However, this is our first year with liquid starter and if we get results that are even close to the dry blends we use then liquid starter is our future.  We also spread our urea after the crop is up for a few reasons.  If its an open winter some guys will spread. 

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