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Best soil in the world

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1 hour ago, jass1660 said:

Watch corn warriors on YouTube it’s all the guys competing to have top yield.

OK, I got my info off the net. Doesn't really matter. Neither location is in IL. So the claim of highest yields is moot.

 

Rick

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This topic is interesting, but very complex.  To use yield as a measure may not accurately determine a soil's potential to grow plants.  Outside factors can and do affect the yield of a crop. Minnesota has great soil, but a shorter growing season.  Nebraska has great soil, but without irritation,  no crop is possible.  North central Iowa, flat as a table. Drainage is an issue.  My point is: a soil's maximum potential has numerous variables. If you could level the playing field: identical heat units, water, drainage then yield might be a more accurate representation of the potential of soil.  My thoughts.

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14 minutes ago, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

This topic is interesting, but very complex.  To use yield as a measure may not accurately determine a soil's potential to grow plants.  Outside factors can and do affect the yield of a crop. Minnesota has great soil, but a shorter growing season.  Nebraska has great soil, but without irritation,  no crop is possible.  North central Iowa, flat as a table. Drainage is an issue.  My point is: a soil's maximum potential has numerous variables. If you could level the playing field: identical heat units, water, drainage then yield might be a more accurate representation of the potential of soil.  My thoughts.

Not quite accurate on the statement about Nebraska.

There are lots of crops grown here without irrigation . Nebraska is one of the top producers of pinto beans and sugar beats. 

Its also not unusual to grow 150 and even 200 bushel corn without irrigation depending on the year. I also had a 40 last year of soybeans that did 55 bushels dryland.

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2 minutes ago, lorenzo said:

Not quite accurate on the statement about Nebraska.

There are lots of crops grown here without irrigation . Nebraska is one of the top producers of pinto beans and sugar beats. 

Its also not unusual to grow 150 and even 200 bushel corn without irrigation depending on the year. I also had a 40 last year of soybeans that did 55 bushels dryland.

I won't argue that.  Just referencing western states that are reliant upon irrigation.   So much variation within one state (or even one side of the county to the other).  Not bashing Nebraska!  😁

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22 minutes ago, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

I won't argue that.  Just referencing western states that are reliant upon irrigation.   So much variation within one state (or even one side of the county to the other).  Not bashing Nebraska!  😁

Sometimes I wonder just how smart it is to water like we do .

one lap around on one of my pivots uses around $1000 dollars worth of fuel.

add in oil changes and wear and tear on the motor and it makes me wonder , not to mention the extra cost of the seed as opposed to dryland seed . 

 

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1 minute ago, lorenzo said:

Sometimes I wonder just how smart it is to water like we do .

one lap around on one of my pivots uses around $1000 dollars worth of fuel.

add in oil changes and wear and tear on the motor and it makes me wonder , not to mention the extra cost of the sead as opposed to dryland sead . 

 

Lorenzo, my dad and I were discussing this the other night.  We constantly find new hybrids with more yield,better fertilizer,  GPS and auto steer to control costs and maximize production.   So, we spend more money to increase crop supply and lower crop prices.  Smart, arn't we.  But it is human nature to improve ourselves.....

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2 hours ago, lorenzo said:

Sometimes I wonder just how smart it is to water like we do .

one lap around on one of my pivots uses around $1000 dollars worth of fuel.

add in oil changes and wear and tear on the motor and it makes me wonder , not to mention the extra cost of the seed as opposed to dryland seed . 

 

How many inches of water are you putting on at a time? That seems like a lot.

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17 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

Fwiw.....I have read report that the Ukrainian has some of the fertilist soil in the world.  Not sure if any better than Ill or IA but sounds neat.  And of all places....Mozambique....guy whole runs big soy operation for Chinese govt said in article, "if politics and etc were none existent and God said to the 1st farmer he made (adam) he could farm anywhere he wanted he would of choose Mozambique. "  Mediterranean weather and deep black soils with decent water and rain patterns.  The pics looked beautiful. 

We have nice sandy loam, or clay, or peat, or mucky weird stuff.  We have all 4 on 400 acres.  There is big pockets of most varieties.  Peat is old lake beds...clay is who knows....loam is on top of gravel.

Ukraine is the breadbasket of Europe. That's what made the Communists' orchestrated famine so awful. You could burn a day or two learning about it. And I don't recall ever learning about it in my NY public school.

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By way of comparison the "A Horizon" of the Loess Plateau in China is about 1000 feet.  But watch the erosion gullys where it hasn't been looked after.  The "Yellow River" wasn't named for artistic effects.

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Just depends how you want to farm.🤣 A vineyard manager that has been successful locally (has a lot citydot clients and changes big bucks) braggs with drip irrigation and micro nutrients sun lite is  the limiting factor.

 

Not my way to farm,but look at hydroponic growing no soil needed.

The best yielding crop I ever had is not what I would of called the best soil. Over the years others  averaged better,but not that year. On that note a immigrant to here back about 1900 saw a very good crop on one field when he was first here. As he had success he bought other land in the area,and finally get that field bought. At his death that was the first field his son was willing to sell. The son is still farming and has not sold much else. So one super crop on a field does not tell the whole story.

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23 hours ago, Missouri Mule said:

That makes sense now, the darn ice took all my dirt and gave it to them. I’m left with rocky ridges and trees🤬. I hope their combine plugs up this year on them.😎. Just kidding that area is some of the best soil I’ve been around. 

Maybe global warming will bring your topsoil back?

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46 minutes ago, Ihfan4life said:

Maybe global warming will bring your topsoil back?

Look out it doesn't swipe the rest when it gets to causing cold.

BTW new term needed

“Delingpole: Guardian Invents Scary New Name for ‘Global Warming’ — ‘Global Heating’ ”

https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2019/05/17/guardian-re-names-climate-change-global-heating-to-sound-scarier/

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DIRT THREAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This is gonna be WAY better than an oil thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:)

Mike

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1 hour ago, mikem said:

DIRT THREAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This is gonna be WAY better than an oil thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:)

Mike

Is that what's called anticipation?

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12 hours ago, oldtanker said:

OK, I got my info off the net. Doesn't really matter. Neither location is in IL. So the claim of highest yields is moot.

 

Rick

Randy Dowdy, corn warriors is great to watch, he is basically growing corn on sand hydroponically.

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We don't have any dirt......... it's called mud 

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This is a very interesting thread. I will throw in some Canadian content about valuable ag land. Yes, we have our famous grain producing prairies, rich clay belt in Northern Ontario, valuable vineyards and fruit trees in the Niagara peninsula, as well as the fertile land along the St. Lawrence river in Quebec that has been farmed sine the 1800’s. There is also the sandy potato country of New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

But, in the 1920’s, some Dutch immigrants to Canada identified a marshy wetlands area about 30 miles north of Toronto Ontario along the Holland River as potentially very fertile land. Using skills they brought with them from their homeland in draining agricultural land that was below sea level, they started draining this wetland area and brining its black fertile soil into cultivation. What is today called “Holland Marsh” comprises more than 20,000 acres of beautiful black soil that produces vegetables and market garden produce for all of Ontario as well as for export. Many claim this is the most valuable agricultural land in Canada. I suppose that could be debated, but it certainly is a beautiful sight to see and impressive to visit.

In addition, I can add a red tractor touch to this story. In October 1954, hurricane Hazel began in the Caribbean and traveled up the east coast of the US and through this area of south-central Ontario. In the weeks leading up to the hurricane there was unusually high rainfall and then Hurricane Hazel dumped up to 8.5 inches of rain on the already water-soaked ground in a very short period of time. The water in the “Marsh” rose 10’ above the newly constructed 4-lane highway 400 that traveled north from Toronto through the marsh. The destruction was catastrophic, 81 lives lost. Within hours of the storm, International Harvester Canada President R.B. Bradley announced a “no charge” tractor and truck rehabilitation service program whereby International Harvester staff and dealers would retrieve stranded trucks and tractors from the flooded areas. They would do all repairs necessary, free of charge, to get the equipment back in the fields. In addition to being a very compassionate and humanitarian initiative it was an awesome public relations activity. (This information is based on stories contained in the book “A History and Memories of International Harvester Canada”) See pics from the book below:

IMG_1197.thumb.jpg.9523d901539d77914a08cd6e1d5be202.jpgIMG_1198.thumb.jpg.cd904475f09029bdeee835adfb1c4a9c.jpg

 

Cheers,

Wes

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4 hours ago, Wes W said:

This is a very interesting thread. I will throw in some Canadian content about valuable ag land. Yes, we have our famous grain producing prairies, rich clay belt in Northern Ontario, valuable vineyards and fruit trees in the Niagara peninsula, as well as the fertile land along the St. Lawrence river in Quebec that has been farmed sine the 1800’s. There is also the sandy potato country of New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

But, in the 1920’s, some Dutch immigrants to Canada identified a marshy wetlands area about 30 miles north of Toronto Ontario along the Holland River as potentially very fertile land. Using skills they brought with them from their homeland in draining agricultural land that was below sea level, they started draining this wetland area and brining its black fertile soil into cultivation. What is today called “Holland Marsh” comprises more than 20,000 acres of beautiful black soil that produces vegetables and market garden produce for all of Ontario as well as for export. Many claim this is the most valuable agricultural land in Canada. I suppose that could be debated, but it certainly is a beautiful sight to see and impressive to visit.

In addition, I can add a red tractor touch to this story. In October 1954, hurricane Hazel began in the Caribbean and traveled up the east coast of the US and through this area of south-central Ontario. In the weeks leading up to the hurricane there was unusually high rainfall and then Hurricane Hazel dumped up to 8.5 inches of rain on the already water-soaked ground in a very short period of time. The water in the “Marsh” rose 10’ above the newly constructed 4-lane highway 400 that traveled north from Toronto through the marsh. The destruction was catastrophic, 81 lives lost. Within hours of the storm, International Harvester Canada President R.B. Bradley announced a “no charge” tractor and truck rehabilitation service program whereby International Harvester staff and dealers would retrieve stranded trucks and tractors from the flooded areas. They would do all repairs necessary, free of charge, to get the equipment back in the fields. In addition to being a very compassionate and humanitarian initiative it was an awesome public relations activity. (This information is based on stories contained in the book “A History and Memories of International Harvester Canada”) See pics from the book below:

IMG_1197.thumb.jpg.9523d901539d77914a08cd6e1d5be202.jpg

 

Cheers,

Wes

Wes, I have read about about the Holland Marsh, the efforts to drain it, the flooding, and subsequent efforts to recover & repair equipment and redrain the swamp.  I knew IH had a part in the recovery / repair  of equipment but never knew that they had done it at no charge. Thanks for the article

boog

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We farm about 25 miles north west of Bloomington,  IL........it might not be the richest soil in the world.......but its black as midnight and capable of growing great crops in lots of weather conditions......around here 180 BPA corn is an all out crop failure! (At least it seem that way anymore)

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The best soil is very dependent on what you plan to grow.

I grow rice on some heavy wet flat clay soil. It holds water tell and is an excellent rice soil. A friend grows strawberries on a Sandy hilltop. His soil is excessively drained and is an excellent strawberry soil.

Strawberries would fail on my flooded clay and my rice would fail on his Sandy hilltop.

Thx-Ace

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I have always believed the best soil in the world is where you can farm ,raise a family and make enough to pay the bills and buy mama a new piece of furniture at end of year and send the kids to school.

So,  for me , the best soil on earthwas a section of dirt on  Polk and Adams AV. In Fresno , Ca.

 

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