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IH 800 plate planter questions — newbie to planters


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I’ve read a couple threads on this forums about IH 800 planters. Most are a little more in-depth for the advice I’m seeking. I just bought a 2-row IH 800 planter that I intend to use for wildlife food plots and maybe gardening. It appeared in very good shape and was a good price. I had read over the years that these planter will no-till well, and that is why I passed over many more expensive Deere’s til I found this red planter not too far from home.

I’m interested in where I can learn more about how this thing works. Is there an online source for manuals, and how do I know exactly what manual covers my row units? What are common wear parts? Maintenance I need to be aware of? Spare parts I should keep on hand?

Also, I know about the plates, what they do, how to change them. What I don’t fully get is the sprocket and how to know whether I need a different one. The owner I purchased it from changed from the original sprocket, saying it planted too much seed. This sprocket is the one part I can’t seem to find in Shoup’s catalog.

Any other advice? Let’s hear it

Thabks in advance for the help. 

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I'm no planter guru but the owner's manual and shop/maintenance manual should be easy to find with a google search. There are a couple businesses prominent in dealing with shop manuals and owner's manuals of older equipment and the IH 800 planter should be easy enough to find given the number made for many years. Jensales is one and another I've bought from on Ebay is Lazy Acres or Peaceful acres or something like that. Shouldn't be hard with an online search. Welcome to the forum, lots of knowledgeable members here.

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The sprockets change the speed the plates turn in relation to the ground travel wheel, so the seeds get placed closer together or farther apart.    Its basically an open gearbox letting you change gear ratios.  There is typically both a driven and driver sprocket that can be changed, giving you a wide variety of possible gear ratios.  I have several planters with about 12 sprockets for each one you can swap in.  

 Unless you have the "chart" (in the manual) its pretty hard to calculate seed spacing for any particular sprocket/plate combination.  (sometimes its even hard WITH the chart!!)   YOur best bet is to get a manual and read up on it.   Maybe somebody on here with a 800 could post a sprocket/spacing chart.  Usually the charts show population/acre, which is also dependent on row spacing, so you need to know that too.

 

Obviously, for food plots, etc, you don't need to worry so much exact spacing for max yield....my guess is the sprocket thats on there will probably work.   You could try putting in some seed and driving 20' or so with it just off the ground (low enough to start the seeds planting) on a hard surface.   Then just count the seeds in couple feet and divide to get spacing.  Average a few.     Typical spacings should be in the 4-6" range for the field, maybe less for food plots?

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The ratio portion of my 900 book, I can't take an easy picture of to post. 

Looking on the CNH Dealer Portal, there's 26 options for ops manuals (consisting of Plate, Cyclo, and Monitor books). There were (2) different P/N#'s for both Trailing and Mounted planters, but here's a couple numbers for you: 1096421R1 should be for the 800 trailing, 1096513R1 should be for the 800 mounted, and 1096602R5 should be for the 800 press wheel driven row unit. It appeared that they should be $40-50 plus freight and available at your local CNH dealer. 

Good luck! I grew up around these planters when I was a little kid, so I know enough to get me in trouble. We converted our 8 rows to Rawson Hydraulic drives before we got rid of them. 

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Thanks all. Yes I understand and fully comprehend how to test the population by turning the drive wheel and counting seed. I just have been unsure of how to go about adjusting that — meaning:

1. I don’t have a chart

2. I can’t tell which manual matches my planter (and are population charts even in these manuals)

3. I don’t see spare sprockets in the Shoup catalog.

Any advice on 2 and 3? Is this considered a “trailing” planter?

I do have a semi-local dealer that I hear knows about old stuff. 

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I have my doubts any aftermarket company has sprockets for one of these planters. I didn't know they existed until my brother got one (4 row fully mounted I think) for his food plots

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I run an 800 6 row plate planter, so I may be able to help. first, we need to know what you have.  Does it have a tongue and wheels with lift cylinders?  or does it mount on a three point hitch?  Is there a chain (2040) that goes from the wheels to a shaft on the planter or is the row unit run by a press wheel that is part of the row unit?  MY expertise covers those planters run by a chain from the transport wheels to a shaft with sprockets on the right end (when viewer from the rear of the planter). cab

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Does the hex shaft that the wheel drives have sprockets that drive another hex shaft that drives the planter units?  The online parts books don't show a two row planter, so this may be a custom fabrication.   The four and six row plate planters have an assembly on the right end of the driven shaft with chains going to changeable sprockets that run the shaft that drives the planter units.  The changeable sprockets have a hex hole and three little prongs that fit tight on an idler shaft fitting.  Sprockets are for number 40 chain  and have from 20 to 34 teeth.  If your planter doesn't have this assembly and drives the planter shaft directly,  you will be in the fabrication business.  Weld a hubs (hex) and number 40 plate sprockets.   cab

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You’ve given me homework to confirm, but what you describe sounds like what I have, with sprockets and assy on the right side (when looking at planter from behind. The spare sprocket previous owner gave me, indeed, has a hex hole and three prongs. 

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This is good news.  You already have several plant spacing's available just by rearranging the sprockets you have.  The shafts both came with two gears that can be used by changing removable hex centered sprockets. You merely have to rearrange the location of the hex sprockets to line up with the small or large sprocket on the shafts.  You remove the chains from the spring loaded idlers so that you can remove the linch pin and spacers. flipping the sprocket around until it lines up with a different gear.  Play with it, you can figure it out.  The hex plate sprockets have a number on them  telling how many pairs of teeth they have.  you use this information and the row spacing along with the number of seed holes in the plate to determine which chart in the book to use.   If given a choice, I prefer to plant large rounds for corn as they are less apt to plant any doubles.  cab

 

 

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MY manual is 'international trailing plate-type planter (four row adjustable ) (six row narrow) part no1096 421 R1.  There are only a few pages you should need. PM me with your mailing address, row spacing (distance center to center of row units ) and plate cell count usually 16 or 24 for corn.  I'll mail you a hard copy of the charts you need. no charge.  cab

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