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Tonyinca

My new to me IH 71 three wire baler arrived !

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49 minutes ago, Tonyinca said:

     I cannot believe how nice the paint and tin appear on the one that says International on back.

   I am looking at the tin and the tying mechanism and salivating , it looks so good from here.

     I have not seen them in person , He offered them to me for very little money and I bought them, So it will be a surprise when they arrive.

      Tony

I have a friend up in Sonoma County has an old Basque rancher buddy with a pile like that. All IH and AC tractors and Ag crawlers. Some stuff his Dad bought brand new. Pictures make my mouth water.

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Very cool.  Utah?  Good n dry to boot.  In Eureka NV my friend worked a hay ranch for few years.  We went down 2 3x.  Took me to man with the biggest personal collection of old machinery and trucks I've seen.  Olivers and jd and ih but some of everything.  Old semis and implements etc.  Could stayed for a day or 2.  0 rust!  5800 elevation and dry!

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On ‎7‎/‎20‎/‎2019 at 11:59 AM, Tonyinca said:

  Yes , Gotta have something to continue the search.

    I have a friend in propane business and I am confident that he'll come across something.

    Tony

l did know where there was LP tanks off of a couple of 560 LP's but not sure if they would fit the "profile" of the baler. Also know of a LP tank off a row crop 350 LP. Been several years since l saw them but l can check into them if you want me to. Just thought of it but Ryan had  a LP tank off of a 806 for sale a few days ago on FB.

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2019 at 10:44 AM, twostepn2001 said:

l did know where there was LP tanks off of a couple of 560 LP's but not sure if they would fit the "profile" of the baler. Also know of a LP tank off a row crop 350 LP. Been several years since l saw them but l can check into them if you want me to. Just thought of it but Ryan had  a LP tank off of a 806 for sale a few days ago on FB.

When I get the baler build going back up ,then i'll get serious .  But I will keep this in mind , Thank You.

    Right now we are still trying to get all of plunger floor and railings out and cleaned to use as templates for new ones.

     I am waiting on the parts balers to see what I have.

     I have a friend in propane business and I am confident that he will come up with something.  am not opposed to him coming up with a new one and welding the stand to fit the gas tank brackets.

     In meantime I run through our local salvage yard measuring tanks that have potential.

       Tony

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My parts supply arrived today.

i ran an add on West coast equipment magazine, AG SOURCE, and after Two and half months I got my only phone call .

Man said he has been in hay business in Diamond Valley Navada . Said he had run many type balers but never #71 IH but he knew they were scarce . 

 Said,These two machines had been taken to a Utah steel mill to be melted , He bought them from mill and brought them to his ranch. Thinking They look to good and being scarce someone may need them for parts . That was five years ago , and here I come and bring them to my yard . He sold them very reasonable.  Trucking added to cost but I did not want to drive 600 miles one way to chase parts .lol. Trucker was his Son so pretty easy deal.

The high desert 6000 ft . elevation ,has preserved them very well and they had no hay left in the chamber .  BTW , Engines are NOT Stuck. According to seller balers sat approx. 15-20 years before going to steel mill and then 5 years at his place.  Now  Starts  all the work finding the one best to restore and harvesting all the good parts and WASH, WASH, WASH !

  Now I own Serial # 62-16, 63-29, 63-36  Probably only three in existence . lol lol.

  I am assuming those serials are the year and  number in assembly line.

Today's pic's 7/30/19

tony

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Wow absolutely unreal how nice they look for being outside

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Baler Wednesday therapy ! 7/31/19

put wheels under the better donor. 

Moved her near shop

John & I removed the total bottom off chamber. 

Hope to have floor and sub floor remade. 

We started in removing sheet metal , Bolts , Bolts and more bolts and of course they all needed heat or cutting . 

I think I have good sheet metal on donor to  replace the really bad or missing ones. 

Next week remove auger and side sheet metal . Then should be ready to start removing bearings and wore sprockets . 

I am feeling pretty comfortable with my parts supply . Aka two donors. 

Last two pic is the floor and plunger rails headed to welding shop and the baler on wheels is the donor 

Tony

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How close are you to having enough parts to build two?

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2 minutes ago, exSW said:

How close are you to having enough parts to build two?

I have been biting my tongue by not mentioning that with two balers fixed it would require buying an additional tractor or two....... Now that I think about it a 1026 and 826 Hydro both in their original gold paint would look correct in front of the pair of balers . Of course this might require another 1026 or two on bale retrieving wagons. 

It's a viscous circle

:)

 

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I probably could , with knowledge gained on first and a little manufacturing . 

However, my ambition only extends to one . Lol 

however , I am going to put wheels under both donors and preserve them for the next guy that needs parts. 

I do not have the heart to send them to scrapper after I am done . I'll let my heirs do that when I'am gone . Lol

tony

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10 minutes ago, bitty said:

I have been biting my tongue by not mentioning that with two balers fixed it would require buying an additional tractor or two....... Now that I think about it a 1026 and 826 Hydro both in their original gold paint would look correct in front of the pair of balers . Of course this might require another 1026 or two on bale retrieving wagons. 

It's a viscous circle

:)

 

Oh please don't even plant those thoughts in the universe! 

But that would look awesome !

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A new enterprise perhaps?

Vintage Custom Baling LLC

 

But: If you have to fab parts,layout and setup is most of the work and cost. And the second baler needs the same parts......?????

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Tony, a couple West Coast baling questions...... I'm assuming that all the bale handling with those 3-wires was all mechanical? Correct? This area was all NH twine with an occasional JD or IH. Dad had a 55T another guy had a 55W. This was back in high school, and the town kids made summer money hiring out to make hay. Most guys pulled a rack directly behind the baler. The guy with the 55W had to pay higher wages because he couldn't get anyone to help. Those bales were just to heavy. We tried shortening them up to make them lighter, but then we just ended up with a square cube.   Did you kick them out on the ground and then pick them up with an elevator. I have a bale  pickup elevator in the trees. We used it, because dad never hired help, it was usually just him and me.  I think it is IH. Would like to restore it some day. We had it on the H. I started out driving the H and then graduated (grew) into stacking on the rack.

Surely those bales had to be manhandled somewhere in the process?  Give us a lesson in West Coast hay making..

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DADS 706,

       In the sixties they were laid flat behind baler and there were truckers that we called our roadsiders  that we hired to pick up behind baler and either roadside it waiting for buyers trucks to pick up or then they took to yard to stack for storage.  WE shot for 110-130 lbs Per bale BTW out here anyone handling hay uses hay hooks.  In videos that I see of Mid West no one uses them.?  Our bales were perhaps more solid and hooks did not slip out.?

    These road siders had bob tail trucks and used the side loader mounted to truck . 

          At the stack if they were topping for tarps and winter storage we had a group of guys that had Hay boom trucks and their specialty was booming hay off trucks to tall hay stacks. Trucker were paid by bale . Boomers were paid by truck load.  The boomers had radios in the pickup and were on call by truckers.

   Then the 70's & 80'S rolled around and  little by little  bales were placed on side behind baler by removing couple of pins on bale shoot and left for the NH bale wagon or the Freeman bale wagon . Again guys had businesses of bale wagons and went farm to farm either road siding or bringing hay to yard . 

     By this time the boom trucks were being replace by hay squeeze and toping off for winter could be done by a good squeeze operator.  Very little hay was placed in enclosed barns , Few of us had tall Pole barns that the squeeze could stack hay inside for winter sales in my case.  Most dairies used a combo of Pole barns and topped off stacks tarped for winter.

 You have to remember our hay is irrigated and we were getting 7-8 cuttings a year with average tonnage for year about 7-10 tons per acre . There was no way the farmer had time to deal with hay bales non mechanical , Not to say in early 50's and 60's I was 5 & 10 years old I got to help my Dad pickup two wire bales but he soon was hiring road siders.  In my day of farming hay 1955-2000  We Cut  ,rake , baled,  Hay was mostly baled  at night because dew was needed to preserve leaves on Alfalfa but too much dew and it molded ,so lot of nights sleeping in pickup out in field waiting on dew.

   As soon as hay was baled regrowth was coming back needed hay out asap and start water back . We cut on 26-32 day schedule  26 for test hay Spring & Fall and 32-35 for summer dry stock hay.  I watered twice per cutting, some watered once per cutting, but their yield reflected it but their TDN might be up, but for a commercial grower, usually price did not make up for volume.

       I have seen a  transformation in hay handling out here , from 7ft hay mower, single rakes, balers that needed two men one each side to thread wire , then the three wire . then the three twine and on to today   with disk bine swathers that travel almost at road speed cutting hay , Big Bale balers and big bale hay wagons to pick them up in same fashion as the small bale wagons. squeezes that are capable of loading more the one big bale at time,   Double hay rakes all hydraulic that let you fly up the field merging two and three windrows together.

  I also have seen hay in the 10-15.00 a ton back in the 50-60's to 300.00 a ton for premium milk cow hay today.

       Tony

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Thanks Tony. That all makes sense. But one correction..... I always used a hay hook. I know one farmer who made his. They were a bit longer. Go to any farm store (at least in this area) and you can still buy hay hooks. Mine are still hanging on my NH68 down in the barn. 

Speed, yes I think the new MacDon's are talking 15-18 mph in the field. You couldn't do that here, but under a circle I imagine you could. I remember a couple times in my youth I stuck the 560 in 5th going across the field.... whoohooo. I can't imagine mowing hay that fast. 

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14 hours ago, dads706 said:

Thanks Tony. That all makes sense. But one correction..... I always used a hay hook. I know one farmer who made his. They were a bit longer. Go to any farm store (at least in this area) and you can still buy hay hooks. Mine are still hanging on my NH68 down in the barn. 

Speed, yes I think the new MacDon's are talking 15-18 mph in the field. You couldn't do that here, but under a circle I imagine you could. I remember a couple times in my youth I stuck the 560 in 5th going across the field.... whoohooo. I can't imagine mowing hay that fast. 

  Out here most large hay fields are laser leveled ,1/4 mile runs, hay is flood irrigated with low rounded water borders being about 100 ft apart .

   So fields are pretty smooth , The danger is; if you hit a badger hole or any other type hole at that speed, its going to hurt. However , some argue that swathers have low profile  wide tires to mitigate the holes . but crazier things have happened. 

    Tony

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Dad had a NH wire tie in my early days and switched to the 56W when I was about 10.  We always used hooks everyone had their own hook and you didn't lend it out for nothing.  I still got my hook around here somewhere.  Need to look for it one of these days to remind me of Dad's 80 lb. bales that were NOT handled mechanically!!  Here we shot for 3 cuttings and 4 was a bonus.  Dad always had about 75 acres of alfalfa and 25+ of clover and grass.  Our big thing was straw.  Would bale 25000+ small straw squares yearly from anyone that would sell it.  Back in the early 70s when my brother and I were running the show and bought our first big round balers we would shoot for up to 1000 acres.  Of course now the boys bale corn stalks for bedding and what little straw they get goes to the feed ration.  In my opinion the greatest invention in baling was the big rounds with net wrap and a no touch system from an a/c cab.

We still have the old 56W setting in the back of an old shed.  The last thing I would ever think of is restoring it.  I hated baling! The only reason we still have it is it is buried too deep in the shed for the $100 we would get at the junk yard.  It does have nice tin work as it never sat outside over night.  Dad was somewhat anal about that!

jerry

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3 hours ago, SMOKER 1 said:

Dad had a NH wire tie in my early days and switched to the 56W when I was about 10.  We always used hooks everyone had their own hook and you didn't lend it out for nothing.  I still got my hook around here somewhere.  Need to look for it one of these days to remind me of Dad's 80 lb. bales that were NOT handled mechanically!!  Here we shot for 3 cuttings and 4 was a bonus.  Dad always had about 75 acres of alfalfa and 25+ of clover and grass.  Our big thing was straw.  Would bale 25000+ small straw squares yearly from anyone that would sell it.  Back in the early 70s when my brother and I were running the show and bought our first big round balers we would shoot for up to 1000 acres.  Of course now the boys bale corn stalks for bedding and what little straw they get goes to the feed ration.  In my opinion the greatest invention in baling was the big rounds with net wrap and a no touch system from an a/c cab.

We still have the old 56W setting in the back of an old shed.  The last thing I would ever think of is restoring it.  I hated baling! The only reason we still have it is it is buried too deep in the shed for the $100 we would get at the junk yard.  It does have nice tin work as it never sat outside over night.  Dad was somewhat anal about that!

jerry

I can see how you would not want to remember that 56w having to handle the bales.

i guess I was lucky as I only handled bales basically when I fed cows and a little when I was small I drove Ford 8n while my dad loaded bales on trailer behind a nieghbor's baler that dad hired in early 50's . But when He bought our 55w he hired the truckers.

From the time I learned to judge hay for baling and operate the baler is was a pleasure . 

I would service baler in afternoon have it set up in field and soon as dew started coming in evening I started . Was nice cool , nite , nobody to bother me and if all went well by time dew came in heavy , I went to bed , In morning I went to school and my Dad would bale as dew was coming off till it got to hot & dry and leaves began to shatter.

my last years baling ( 2000) was last , I had a 4440 cab & air a New holland and I would service in afternoon , carried nine rolls wire , shower and have dinner then go out when dew came run till about 2Am during early summer . Go home pull my coveralls off wash my hands go to bed , I would be clean as long as no problems . 

Felt great to see 40 -80 acres of bales shadows from the moon behind me .

the 56w with the engine on it IMHO was a gorgeous looking baler in its time. Never got to run one we went from 55W to #71 then to NH's from there

tony

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You should write a book.

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Here ya go Tony, 56w. And it is pretty.

 

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1 hour ago, exSW said:

Here ya go Tony, 56w. And it is pretty.

 

Thank You ! I appreciate it , as much as I have searched u-tube never came across this.  This is the only engine model that I have seen restored and working, Its a beauty IMHO

  I my minds eye after growing up with a 55W that baler looked so modern and sharp to me then and still does.

  I think those came out in 1957 ? if so I would of been 11 years old.

  The only changes I would make to one above is Radiator chaff screen either silver or white, they had a straight pipe exhaust about half as tall as the muffler, We could here them running at nite from a long way off.

       One light forward of the belt engage lever in front shinning on the pickup, and a two foot tall tube on rear bale chamber about have way back  with two small pipe welded to mount a IH  light forward to light knotters and one light facing back to see bales dropping.  Also by this time most had the hydraulic tension settings.

  BTW ,Notice the similarities already of the( 1957) 56 two wire or twine and later in 1962 the 71 three wire.  The square bale chamber front, flywheel inside, the more square tin work .  Basically the 71 is just a bigger version with a Wisc. engine and extra knotter .lol

    Thanks ,

     Tony

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That video is the first I've seen with a motor.  Ours was a PTO.  Still had the big pulley but the drive pulley was in front and low off a 90 degree gear box to the pto.  

I just can't imagine baling at night with the dew on.  We always ran at the hottest time of the day here in the midwest.  

jerry

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Baling at night almost never happens here. As soon as the dew hits you can hear that baler and tractor start talking back. Help on the wagon lets you know too. Round balers more forgiving but unless you're wrapping they run the risk of spoiling.

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There's a guy I work with has a 56T. I'm sure it hasn't been used in years. His Dad was a Great Lakes oreboat Captain. I guess he liked to work his boys when he was home.

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4 hours ago, SMOKER 1 said:

That video is the first I've seen with a motor.  Ours was a PTO.  Still had the big pulley but the drive pulley was in front and low off a 90 degree gear box to the pto.  

I just can't imagine baling at night with the dew on.  We always ran at the hottest time of the day here in the midwest.  

jerry

  In the fall when we have higher humidity we bale late mornings into afternoons.

  The only thing that makes Alfalfa valuable is the leaves to stem ratio and if we bale in  afternoon it leaves  shatters fall off , too hot , no humidity ,dairies do not want straw.

   When we bale at night its when dew is coming in or going off . In June usually dew comes in around 4-5 in morning, in summer dew usually comes in around 10-pm tp 1AM by 5AM usually too wet till about 8-9 Am then go to  till about noon. In the fall dew usually starts in about 5-6 PM and by ten PM to wet then in AM from about 10-11 to about 2PM

     Its all about just enough dew to soften stems and save leaves and stopping when to much dew . it was an ART to be a good baler man in old days.

      Today with the big balers they want it little dryer , I have never baled big baler so I cannot speak much to them.

     Tony

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