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Its sad but farms are fading away fast here!


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We never had a strong ag community back in the day of my grandpa the area had it all! The dairy farms here progressed till the 70s the 80s rolled around and alot of guys shut down those older guys hung onto the farm untill they dad well in the past 20 to 15 years alot of those guys past on and the kids finally got it all straightened out and alot of these farms are all getting broken up in 20 acer parcels and sell to hunters wanting food plots and house builders! Pretty soon i dont think thier be anything left of a actual farm! They break them all up and get every nickel they can out of them! And from a ag point of view you cant pay 4k a acer on ground that will barely grow 135 bushel corn as it sits! Things are definitely changing! Good or bad i dont know! 

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Well, there are 2 ways to look at it..........breaking them up into little chunks is the only way I(we....me and my wife) could afford to buy anything.  Me and my sister sub-divided the farm to the west next door to where I grew up, I paid $10k an acre for what I got and people told the owner he was being way to generous with us.  Hopefully we can get it paid off here shortly and I am trying to convince my other neighbor to do a similar thing so I can add to what we got.  It seems like a lot of money, but my dad thought the same thing years ago and was to scared or cheap to pull the trigger, and he could have bought the same thing I did for $1000 an acre but it was 35 acres then, looking back that was crazy to pass up......

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It is changing at the fastest pace I have ever seen. Neighbor is going to stop milking cows when they run out of feed. They are going to add more beef on. Five miles from us a 350 cow herd is for sale, been renting to a guy for a year who was going to buy it. Now it's up in the air what is going to happen there. Unfortunately we have had a lot of lots sold for building in the last 30 years. Young Mennonite who drills our cover crop every fall lost enough last year in his crops he's not sure what he's going to do this year until the bank says he can. Guy who custom chopped and hauled manaur got stiffed on too much chopping last year and sold the tractors, tanks and has the chopper for sale. He might have had the two 30' mowers at fraleys sale last week

They aren't making new dirt 

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7 hours ago, Gleaner k2 said:

We never had a strong ag community back in the day of my grandpa the area had it all! The dairy farms here progressed till the 70s the 80s rolled around and alot of guys shut down those older guys hung onto the farm untill they dad well in the past 20 to 15 years alot of those guys past on and the kids finally got it all straightened out and alot of these farms are all getting broken up in 20 acer parcels and sell to hunters wanting food plots and house builders! Pretty soon i dont think thier be anything left of a actual farm! They break them all up and get every nickel they can out of them! And from a ag point of view you cant pay 4k a acer on ground that will barely grow 135 bushel corn as it sits! Things are definitely changing! Good or bad i dont know! 

Thing is what's these kids supposed to do? Dad most likely worked em to death and all they heard whenever they wanted something was how tight money was (even if it wasn't at the time). SO they finished HS and moved on to college,then into the workforce. They have no interest in the farm and there is no one to blame. 

And when dad died what was the incentive to hold onto something where most of their memories were not good. They ain't coming back to farm. They can try to rent it but can make far more selling.

Heck, I'm sitting on a farm here. Value to a farmer? About 500,000. Value to a developer? About 1.2 million. Where is my incentive to sell to a farmer? The young gun you want to see get a chance can't come up with the 500K. A BTO can. But a BTO ain't going to match the developer? I'm not blaming anyone. You have to do what's best for you, both in your wallet and in your heart. My place is not for sale.

Rick

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I really don’t think there’s development in the Midwest like there is here. Look up jaindl farms on google.  Local BTO.  Farms 12000 acres which he owns and has ultimate plans to develop it ALL. It’s painful to watch your way of life turn into acres of soccer moms and mini vans with their damn picket fence

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44 minutes ago, Bdse25 said:

I really don’t think there’s development in the Midwest like there is here. Look up jaindl farms on google.  Local BTO.  Farms 12000 acres which he owns and has ultimate plans to develop it ALL. It’s painful to watch your way of life turn into acres of soccer moms and mini vans with their damn picket fence

People have to have a place to live too.........or are you advocating eliminating human life so the landscape doesn't change? Part of this is the so called American dream. The government give away of land in the 1800's have been romanticized for a century. "People came to America for a place of their own" I was told in school. When most were actually fleeing religious or personal persecution or famine. The real dream was to improve your lot in life. To be someplace where you didn't have to be a peasant just because you were born a peasant. But people have become convinced that owning your own place is the dream of dreams. So they don't have to live in an apartment in a city with a population density of 27,000 per square mile like NYC.

Kinda scary. But that way of life is still out there for right now. Just getting crowded out in some places.

Rick

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1 minute ago, oldtanker said:

People have to have a place to live too.........or are you advocating eliminating human life so the landscape doesn't change? Part of this is the so called American dream. The government give away of land in the 1800's have been romanticized for a century. "People came to America for a place of their own" I was told in school. When most were actually fleeing religious or personal persecution or famine. The real dream was to improve your lot in life. To be someplace where you didn't have to be a peasant just because you were born a peasant. But people have become convinced that owning your own place is the dream of dreams. So they don't have to live in an apartment in a city with a population density of 27,000 per square mile like NYC.

Kinda scary. But that way of life is still out there for right now. Just getting crowded out in some places.

Rick

Well since you asked what annoys me is that the best farmland gets built up.  Cities on the east coast were settled in areas with real nice soil, so their occupants had access to plentiful food, since the 60’s urban sprawl has consumed most of the nice ground around here.  All the nice 160 acre fields make perfect warehouse pads. All that’s left to farm are little shale patches and hills.  Scroll over to trexlertown pa on google maps, thousands of acres are now under roof so that people can get their Amazon shipments 3 hours quicker

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3 minutes ago, Bdse25 said:

Well since you asked what annoys me is that the best farmland gets built up.  Cities on the east coast were settled in areas with real nice soil, so their occupants had access to plentiful food, since the 60’s urban sprawl has consumed most of the nice ground around here.  All the nice 160 acre fields make perfect warehouse pads. All that’s left to farm are little shale patches and hills.  Scroll over to trexlertown pa on google maps, thousands of acres are now under roof so that people can get their Amazon shipments 3 hours quicker

Yea but what I'm saying is you ain't going to stop it. And when it comes to land that someone may wish to sell? Money talks and BS walks. Maybe you need to look at moving out to the midwest.

Rick

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1 hour ago, Bdse25 said:

I really don’t think there’s development in the Midwest like there is here. Look up jaindl farms on google.  Local BTO.  Farms 12000 acres which he owns and has ultimate plans to develop it ALL. It’s painful to watch your way of life turn into acres of soccer moms and mini vans with their damn picket fence

There's a silver lining in that though. The more acres taken out of production because of population increases means more demand from less acres = higher commodity prices. Farming is a business first and foremost - think of land as an asset and conduct business accordingly. Otherwise, it's a liability and you're better off selling.

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In the fine state of Washington DOE,  W.D.F.W,  L&I along with our idiot Governor will do about anything and everything they can to run farmers and small companies out of business. Dems are in control of legislature, also the Court system, All because there are 3 counties (Snohomish, King, Pierce) In western Washington that control the entire State. If your aTreaty Tribe then you control everyone in your county and beyond. State has given tribes to much power trying to appease them, seems they are never happy just want more. State doesn't have enough money to spend on Freebees so they want more Taxes raised on business. Western Washington farm ground is disappearing because of to many rules/regulations because State need to put a farmer out of business to "Save the Salmon".

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1 hour ago, Indy Farmer said:

There's a silver lining in that though. The more acres taken out of production because of population increases means more demand from less acres = higher commodity prices. Farming is a business first and foremost - think of land as an asset and conduct business accordingly. Otherwise, it's a liability and you're better off selling.

Easy for you to say when it’s not the farm generations of your family have slaved away building up.  And your statement about commodity prices doesn’t hold out when it’s ground you rent being taken away and sold into development.  To give a scope of how rediculis it’s gotten a 20 acre piece a few miles away just sold for 2 million for a urgent care center.  I just worry if there’ll be anything left in 40 years

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having farmed for nearly 50 years after my dad passed i purchased 4 new swathers (windrowers) . Trading up and in 2002 i traded for a used one and then another used one after that. I will tell you i had 4 times as much expense in the used 2 as the previous 4 new ones i had purchased prior. I had decided that only way to buy a swather is NEW. Well now they are scratching $200,00 + and used ones with 1000 hours are fetching $150,000. I decided the only thing for me to do was quit. I rented the land out and sold most all of my machinery. But my son and grandsons have NO INTENTIONS of coming back to farm. When they get $30 a hour working construction on the front range of Colorado what is happening? I feel Agriculture along with our irrigation water out here in the plains is soon going to be a thing of the past.

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28 minutes ago, Bdse25 said:

Easy for you to say when it’s not the farm generations of your family have slaved away building up.  And your statement about commodity prices doesn’t hold out when it’s ground you rent being taken away and sold into development.  To give a scope of how rediculis it’s gotten a 20 acre piece a few miles away just sold for 2 million for a urgent care center.  I just worry if there’ll be anything left in 40 years

For centuries kings ruled Europe. I'm sure the nobles felt the same way you do when the peasants revolted. But times change. Has more to do with the industrial revolution than anything else. The ability to manufacture goods the likes that had never been seen created the demand for workers. Kids now had other options than to scratch out a subsistence living. Heck a lot of farmers who did have an option were happy that their kids were able to chose.  

9 minutes ago, hagan said:

having farmed for nearly 50 years after my dad passed i purchased 4 new swathers (windrowers) . Trading up and in 2002 i traded for a used one and then another used one after that. I will tell you i had 4 times as much expense in the used 2 as the previous 4 new ones i had purchased prior. I had decided that only way to buy a swather is NEW. Well now they are scratching $200,00 + and used ones with 1000 hours are fetching $150,000. I decided the only thing for me to do was quit. I rented the land out and sold most all of my machinery. But my son and grandsons have NO INTENTIONS of coming back to farm. When they get $30 a hour working construction on the front range of Colorado what is happening? I feel Agriculture along with our irrigation water out here in the plains is soon going to be a thing of the past.

Ag is still going to be here. It's just going to be done differently. Heck 100 years about over 1/2 the US population either farmed or worked in an ag industry to feed us. Now it's not even 1% producing not only enough to feed us but enough to burn in engines and to export.

Just how it works. Use to be it took thousands to get coal out the ground. Thousands to produce what one dip of a bucket on a mime shovel can.

 

Rick 

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Sigh..... the US alone loses near a million.  Yes...look up data... acres of farmed ground per year.  So...where are commodity prices?  

Asset for sure to hopefully make money on.  But in some near urban areas the most $ is develop to a lower use but high $ value.  People nowdays are leaving most big cities so the suburbs are growing alot.  Not like china wherr they are forcing rural folks into cement skyrises.

Here land is $20k a acre all day.  Across border is $45k to 60k easily.  Vancouver is looking for room and we are too close.  And no....nothing can pay if you pay those prices.  Its out of Ag $ buying it or guy with 400 lower debt acres buying it with that equity.

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Around Myrtle Beach South Carolina where I grew up all the family farms have been gone for years. When people in my generation (born in early 40's)  inherited the family farm they promptly sold it to developers for $$ and became temporarily rich! By  the time they retired the sale money was gone and they worked at hotels for the Carpet Baggers that they had sold the family farm to for what proved to be peanuts.  Sad: but that is how it is!

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1 hour ago, TroyDairy said:

Sigh..... the US alone loses near a million.  Yes...look up data... acres of farmed ground per year.  So...where are commodity prices?  

Asset for sure to hopefully make money on.  But in some near urban areas the most $ is develop to a lower use but high $ value.  People nowdays are leaving most big cities so the suburbs are growing alot.  Not like china wherr they are forcing rural folks into cement skyrises.

Here land is $20k a acre all day.  Across border is $45k to 60k easily.  Vancouver is looking for room and we are too close.  And no....nothing can pay if you pay those prices.  Its out of Ag $ buying it or guy with 400 lower debt acres buying it with that equity.

Thing is Tony it's not how much ground is being farmed. It's how much is being produced. Back in the 40's and 50's production was no where near what it is today. In 71/72 when my sister met her husband, a dairy farmer he and his dad were very happy with a cow that gave 45 LBS a day. That was to them a very good cow. Lot of the farmers here were like that and even though there were stories in Hoard's Dairyman about 90 LBS herds with some even going over 100 they scoffed at it. 80 BPA corn here was the norm but we heard about 150 BPA corn in IA. 70 BPA wheat was a good crop too. Now a 45 LBS cow is a joke. Most likely most good dairymen sent her to slaughter before she got down to 45 LBS a day. Here we have guys bumping 220 BPA corn on non-irrigated land. 70 BPA wheat is considered the norm and has to go over 90 to be a bumper crop. Now that's for this area. Guys in IA are bumping 300 BPA Corn. So with land setting idle that was farmed, and the losses to urban development (look it up, about 1% of farmland in 50 years) and increases in population farmers today are still producing more corn, beans, and wheat than we use. Part because other nations have started to produce more too. So the drop from 35 million farms to 3,500,000 farms has not affected how much food is available. The reduction in in farmland because of CRP and other land just sitting idle hasn't affected supply because production has increased by 150% on grain crops sense 1970.

Land close to a city is going to continue to increase in value. One thing our country has going for it is we have room for the cities to spread out to a certain extent. Places like Europe have no other option but to go up.  

1 hour ago, oleman said:

Around Myrtle Beach South Carolina where I grew up all the family farms have been gone for years. When people in my generation (born in early 40's)  inherited the family farm they promptly sold it to developers for $$ and became temporarily rich! By  the time they retired the sale money was gone and they worked at hotels for the Carpet Baggers that they had sold the family farm to for what proved to be peanuts.  Sad: but that is how it is!

I'm sure that some who sold out were smart and used that money wisely. But we have too much fun laughing at the guy who sells property then buys a new car and a boat or something like that. I saw something in the news the other day. Some woman who's home was repossessed like 2 months ago won 150,000 on the lottery. The first thought that crossed my mind was that I'll bet she just didn't start buying lottery tickets or scratch-offs.  And I wonder if she could have kept her home had she not gambled her money away? Yea we like people like that cause they make us feel good about ourselves. 

But I submit this. If the going price of land is 100 an acre and you take the money then you did OK. That's not saying you wouldn't have done better had you help onto it. Maybe held out to the value increase to 200 an acre. But the seller still did OK. It's what they did with the money after that. If they ain't farming what would they have gained by sitting on that land?

I'm sitting on 200 acres. If sold as farm land it's worth about 500,000. It's also considered "prime recreation land". Sold to a developer maybe 1.2 million. What exactly would be my gain or incentive to sell at the lower price?

Rick

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While visiting my family in Minnesota last winter I noticed solar farms in fields.  Yep, they are renting land for solar farms for $1000/acre/year. Signing long term leases to, competition for land rent that crops can not complete with, and no way it will work out for the solar farm long term,  sad really

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4 minutes ago, AKwelder said:

While visiting my family in Minnesota last winter I noticed solar farms in fields.  Yep, they are renting land for solar farms for $1000/acre/year. Signing long term leases to, competition for land rent that crops can not complete with, and no way it will work out for the solar farm long term,  sad really

I got a hunch that most of those Solar farms are owned by some shell company and the second it looks like it's going to go bad that company will go bust and the land owner will get stuck with the cost of tearing all that garbage down.

Rick

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16 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Thing is what's these kids supposed to do? Dad most likely worked em to death and all they heard whenever they wanted something was how tight money was (even if it wasn't at the time). SO they finished HS and moved on to college,then into the workforce. They have no interest in the farm and there is no one to blame. 

Part of the reason boys no longer wanted to farm was girls no longer wanted to farm. 1950s not uncommon for a girl to become a housewife or a farmwife. Early 1960s too. Then more so over time, girls wanted to go to college and be anything but a housewife and a farmwife. So, agriculture basically had no choice but to evolve into a corporate industry so everybody could have the off-farm American dream lifestyle.

He worked like **** in the country so he could live in the city, where he worked like **** so he could live in the country.

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Just now, oldtanker said:

I got a hunch that most of those Solar farms are owned by some shell company and the second it looks like it's going to go bad that company will go bust and the land owner will get stuck with the cost of tearing all that garbage down.

Rick

That's precisely what has happened in a number cases. Some of these guys are getting a little smarter now and demanding money put in escrow in case something happens the money is there to clean the mess up. I also know of cases where the land rent at first is great to suck you in. The lease is then transferred to someone else and the terms of the lease allows for a renegotiation of the lease and for a substantial amount less than the original lease with the landowner holding a empty bag.

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3 minutes ago, lightninboy said:

Part of the reason boys no longer wanted to farm was girls no longer wanted to farm. 1950s not uncommon for a girl to become a housewife or a farmwife. Early 1960s too. Then more so over time, girls wanted to go to college and be anything but a housewife and a farmwife. So, agriculture basically had no choice but to evolve into a corporate industry so everybody could have the off-farm American dream lifestyle.

He worked like **** in the country so he could live in the city, where he worked like **** so he could live in the country.

I don't quite agree. When I moved to a rural dairy area of MN while in high school a lot of the girls talked of being wives and mothers. Lot of my male class mates that grew up on a farm could think of nothing else but getting out of school and getting away from the farm. About 70% of my senior class were farm kids with about 1/2 of em male. Out of about 20 of the guys who were farm kids 2, that's it, 2 wanted to stay on the farm. Both of those family farms failed in the 80's.

Rick

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1 hour ago, AKwelder said:

While visiting my family in Minnesota last winter I noticed solar farms in fields.  Yep, they are renting land for solar farms for $1000/acre/year. Signing long term leases to, competition for land rent that crops can not complete with, and no way it will work out for the solar farm long term,  sad really

Been getting a few of those calls myself the last couple of years from some solar company, I'm not very good at returning calls to these types. Maybe i should see how much cashola they have in mind.🤔

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1 hour ago, 806 man said:

Been getting a few of those calls myself the last couple of years from some solar company, I'm not very good at returning calls to these types. Maybe i should see how much cashola they have in mind.🤔

Some guys are putting these in the corners not reached by their pivot.   Seems like a good compromise for land with questionable returns without irrigation.   But it sure is an interesting change for the farm

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