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Montyp1369

IH 806 remote required??

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Hey guys. My first post here. Recently acquired a 65 IH 806. Trying to do a quasi-restoration. 

 

It has (shocker) a pretty good leak on the remote valve under the seat. My question is, is it possible to remove this completely off the tractor? 

I don’t need it for my purposes. All I’m doing is running a Bush Hog on the PTO, and pulling a disk (not hydraulic disk.) 

I don’t need the remote capabilities at all. I’d rather remove it then tolerate the leak, or spend any significant amount of money repairing something I’m not going to use. 

 

Apologies in advance if this topic has been covered. New to the site, I did a cursory search and was unable to find the topic. 

 

Thank you for any help. Monty. 

Tried to attach some photos of the work so far. Hopefully they’ll show. 

 

 

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Hello first off welcome to the forum. You can pull that remote off and rebuild it or go a Salvage yard and get another one to replace it. Here is a break down of it from my IT book. I also have a 65 806D. Pm me if you have any other questions. Hope this helps.

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Easy to rebuild with out taking valve off tractor, BUT you have to know how and it takes a bit to explain it.  Can be removed but a plate would have to be installed.  

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Hey Wes & Pete, thanks for the advice. 

 

Wes is there a kit specifically for this valve? How difficult of a procedure is it? 

I can repack cylinders, but have never torn into a valve. 

 

Pete do you know off hand what that plate is called? Is it something you can buy or something you’d have to make? 

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14 minutes ago, Montyp1369 said:

Wes is there a kit specifically for this valve? How difficult of a procedure is it? 

I haven't rebuilt one myself but it don't look to be hard from what I've seen. There is a guy by me that has about 4 806 he's parting out. I just picked up a remote from him and was back up in a couple hours. He had a few remotes there that looked good. As Pete said you could take it off and put a plate on  Your leak may be just the O-rings where it bolts on or where the tube bolts on top. Good luck hope this helps.                                                     WES

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where is it actually leaking from?

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15 minutes ago, Wes806 said:

I haven't rebuilt one myself but it don't look to be hard from what I've seen. There is a guy by me that has about 4 806 he's parting out. I just picked up a remote from him and was back up in a couple hours. He had a few remotes there that looked good. As Pete said you could take it off and put a plate on  Your leak may be just the O-rings where it bolts on or where the tube bolts on top. Good luck hope this helps.                                                     WES

Wes, can you tell me more about the plate? I really don’t care about having the valve at all. I’d prefer to alleviate any future problems with it 

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1 minute ago, Montyp1369 said:

Wes, can you tell me more about the plate?

I don't know if IH has a plate for it or not. You might call your dealer and check with them. If not I would think you could use 3/8 or 1/4 flat steel and cut it to fit and drill the holes out as on the remote and bolt on.                WES

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13 minutes ago, Wes806 said:

I don't know if IH has a plate for it or not. You might call your dealer and check with them. If not I would think you could use 3/8 or 1/4 flat steel and cut it to fit and drill the holes out as on the remote and bolt on.                WES

The supply and return ports must be connected.

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2 minutes ago, snoshoe said:

The supply and return ports must be connected.

Thanks for bring that up I forgot that. Sure glad you pointed that out. Thanks

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Sounds like the unloader for the remote. Not that hard to fix nor too expensive. You may aquire something that needs a remote later on. And even if you dont the next owner will more than likely want one. 

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13 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Sounds like the unloader for the remote. Not that hard to fix nor too expensive. You may aquire something that needs a remote later on. And even if you dont the next owner will more than likely want one. 

x2  The ones Ive done that leaked out of that hole had a bad latching piston.  Part # is 396582R1, about $30.  With the O rings, you'd have less than $50 invested.  Like said above its hard to explain how to do it, but if you have the time its easy to do.  That piston looks like a small pin, the ones I've taken out always looked fine, but it takes a new one to fix the leak.

    I know if it were mine, Id definately fix it instead of remove it.

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You will miss those hydraulics when thier gone! And if you ever decided to sell it and no hydraulics nobody wants a tractor with no hydraulics! If you up grade disc or bush hogs you may want hydraulics! Just saying in my personal life experiences when you say you dont need something down the road you wish you had it! So id just fix the darn thing!

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A flat plate would deadhead the hydraulics and cause more problems, so don't get any ideas of just punching some holes in a piece of steel with a drill press and gluing it on there with a bunch of silicone. Whatever is used would need to divert the hydraulic flow from whatever is the IN to whatever is the OUT.

If your 806 is early enough it will have a separate cap from the valve. Later ones had an "end" valve with the cap integrated in. IF you're lucky all you need to do is pull the valve and reinstall the cap with shorter bolts. The cap has the passages to return the oil.

Otherwise you will need a "power beyond" end cap, and a hose to connect the two ports together.

It would be cheaper to take the valve to an "old timer" mechanic, as they know the secrets of fixing them, than buying the power beyond plate. BTW and "old timer" doesn't have to be OLD, just someone who knows how to work on this old stuff.

For sure keep the old valve and lines for the next guy if you do decide to remove them.

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I vote with the last 4 respondents.

Remove pin from linkage in front then remove block from valve spool. Then unscrew tube from back. If the nut or cap comes without the tube. Retighten until tube moves then back off. That usually brought them out for me. At this point the spool assy will slide out of valve. Clamp nut in vise. Put pipe wrench on tube right next to nut so pipe don't crack and turn tube off of nut. Remove nut from vise. Clamp pin end of spool in vise standing straight up.you will see a screw in the end. Note its depth then remove it. That will release detent pressure and things will come apart now. Be prepared for three steel balls to fall out when detent sleeve is removed. Under the screw you removed is a spring a ball follower and a ball that pushes the other three. With those out stick an appropriate punch in one of the ball holes and unscrew the actuater releasing the centering spring. Inside that actuator is the piston or pin that is your trouble. Replace it and the other three orings and reassemble. I could have done 2 while typing this.

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x2.   Or--just pull the valve and take it to a dealer with a mech you trust. Let them fix it, pay the bill, and bolt her back on.     My dealer told me (knowing I am a competent mechanic) to just bring it in; they could fix it faster than they could tell me how to fix it.  So everybody saved time and I was out a little extra cash---and it didn't leak.

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4 hours ago, snoshoe said:

I vote with the last 4 respondents.

Remove pin from linkage in front then remove block from valve spool. Then unscrew tube from back. If the nut or cap comes without the tube. Retighten until tube moves then back off. That usually brought them out for me. At this point the spool assy will slide out of valve. Clamp nut in vise. Put pipe wrench on tube right next to nut so pipe don't crack and turn tube off of nut. Remove nut from vise. Clamp pin end of spool in vise standing straight up.you will see a screw in the end. Note its depth then remove it. That will release detent pressure and things will come apart now. Be prepared for three steel balls to fall out when detent sleeve is removed. Under the screw you removed is a spring a ball follower and a ball that pushes the other three. With those out stick an appropriate punch in one of the ball holes and unscrew the actuater releasing the centering spring. Inside that actuator is the piston or pin that is your trouble. Replace it and the other three orings and reassemble. I could have done 2 while typing this.

I would not recommend tightening that large nut if tube does not come out with nut.  One of our customers did that ONE time and broke the end of the valve body.  Luckily my  brother in law was working at the shop with me and he welded it . I would not have given it much chance of working but it is still on that tractor as far as I know, over 40 years later. 

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The way I was taught if the nut comes loose and the tube stays put, take a 12 point 1 1/2" socket, tap on the socket with a hammer hard enough to leave 12 dents in the tube. Push it against the tube and rattle it with a 1/2" impact wrench. Make sure it's in reverse...  It's always worked for me. 

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I realize anything can happen and these things are older now than when I worked on them. The procedure I described always worked for me. The cracked tubes I saw resulted from applying the pipe wrench other than directly over the nut or worse without the nut in it.

I see no problem with a proper weld. The only force is what is applyed by the hand lever and it doesn't have to seal.

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6 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

The way I was taught if the nut comes loose and the tube stays put, take a 12 point 1 1/2" socket, tap on the socket with a hammer hard enough to leave 12 dents in the tube. Push it against the tube and rattle it with a 1/2" impact wrench. Make sure it's in reverse...  It's always worked for me. 

I wonder who came up with that idea.  Almost wish I had one to work on to give it a try.  Learn something every day.  Some of those tubes were steel and some were pot metal so I wonder if that would make a difference. 

What I always  did when I was putting the spool assembly back together again, was to clamp that   big nut in the vise and put the pipe wrench on the pipe and tighten the heck out of it so next time around (and there would be a next time in  a few years) there would be no doubt the pipe would come along with the nut. 

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One of the "Senior" mechanics showed me that when I was first starting in the dealer in 1979. He was only about 5 years or so older than me but more experienced. 

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22 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

One of the "Senior" mechanics showed me that when I was first starting in the dealer in 1979. He was only about 5 years or so older than me but more experienced. 

That is a blasted good idea!  

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