Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...

Oh, BTW---I had to laugh at your description of the valve linkage and how you found out "too late" they worked backwards......

When I was much younger, I took a nice deep mower deck off a Case lawnmower that had grenaded, and made a frame to mount it on. I put it on wheels, pivoting on the front, and added a offset tongue.  Then I mounted a 12HP vertical shaft motor directly onto it with a short belt directly between the motor and the deck belt pulley.   I figured I could pull it off the the side and mow 2 swaths at once!  So I get it all made, including battery start and remote controls.  Start it up and try it out and....it doesn't mow worth C**P.   Thats when I realized that this is a CASE deck that blows to the LEFT---and the blades turn backwards from every other deck on the planet---which means my motor is turning them backwards.....

So----I ended up redoing the whole thing: raise the motor, bring the belt out the front around a couple of small pulleys and back under to the deck to reverse rotation.  Much more complicated!   I used it a couple years (It worked great to mow the ditches.) Worked fine except you had to think ahead...no sharp turns and no backing up!  Then my main mower died and we bought a zero turn.  Deck is still sitting in the corner of the shop---its hard to throw out the "projects'!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
On 7/15/2019 at 3:27 PM, Jeff-C-IL said:

Oh, BTW---I had to laugh at your description of the valve linkage and how you found out "too late" they worked backwards......

Hey Jeff, sorry I missed this post.  Yeah.... that was frustrating.  The hydraulic handle set up did get turned back around though.  I didn't do it, and wasn't all that happy with what was done, but it is what it is.  Had I been asked/told to change it I would have.  But one of the other guys decided to disappear with the controls one day while I was gone and "fix" them.  They do work..... but not as well as they did originally.  Things didn't get welded exactly square.  But..... it works correctly now.  

On that note, probably this winter we'll have to pull the detents off the valve and rebuild them.  They still won't work right.  Main valve wants to stick, none of the detents will work.  Yes, I adjusted them, but they either won't trip, or won't hold.  They were all rusted up when we got them.  They just need replaced.  Got some leaks on the valve stack too, but nothing major.  Probably just take the whole thing off and take it apart and reseal/rebuilt it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, here is the last and final update to the project:

(Anything else will just be conversation, as I now consider the rebuild *DONE*.)

 

We have now put about 20 hours or so on the 45 and had a lul in field work.  Getting ready to go work the ground we didn't plant, and get things set up and ready for fall tillage.  Just as a note, we didn't plant around 450 acres.  Anyway, I wanted to put the last few things on the tractor, give it a quick rinse and finish it up.  

Flashers still didn't work, so I had ordered a new turn signal switch.  Cab recycle vent wasn't in.  Bought new armrests for the seat and were/are having some issues with the speedometer and low hyd oil level sensor.  I think the oil sensor either has sludge built up on it, or it's bad.  (Probably sludge from the Deere oil we drained out....?)  I'll have to come back to that sometime as you have to drain the front axle to take the sensor out.  The light on the dash goes on and off randomly.  I OHM'd the sensor and got nothing...... although not sure how the sensor is made anyway.  SM didn't really say, and the only test procedure was basically to check the wiring and warning system.  If they work but you are still having issues, it says replace the sensor.  (Duh.)  Moving on..... I put the new armrests on the seat, which I had ordered from All States..... and got a vinyl and a cloth.  Ordered two cloth armrests.  We decided to install them mismatched because we have some other tractor that need new armrests with the same style of seat and this way we can see which style we like best, lol.  Later well just order a mismatched set again, and have a set of each.  Speedo issue may or may not be resolved.... haven't drove it since working on it.  It may also be in the tach as we sent it out for rebuild and it came back with the same issues.  (Also had a bill attached, which sucks as it still doesn't read the 100's digit.)  It will be going back.....1yr warranty.  So, minor things finished.  Shoot..... I just remembered, I still have to finish the "buddy" seat.  Dang.  Oh well, no big deal, lol. 

Then there was washing off the tractor and installing the decals.  NOW she looks like a tractor again!  We added some customization to the decals, but basically they are stock.  We had them made at a local vinyl shop.  I think they did a great job.  I installed them today, and nobody say they're crooked either!!!  Putting on decals that big is HARD! 

Enjoy the pics!!! 

20190806_185008.thumb.jpg.16c09d7c68ef6a093c28d60387005d2f.jpg20190806_185021.thumb.jpg.7e92864a964e2e4d65513254ecdfbf98.jpg20190806_185049.thumb.jpg.cc6f548042503063e0ba848d73a1e648.jpg20190806_185038.thumb.jpg.3b53c9ac8fc7c6d6271db98538b193ea.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's some advice for guys who do big jobs like this, or a restoration job that may take months or years:

(In no particular order at all.)

1.) Go buy a spiral notebook, or a legal pad just for the job.  Make all your notes in this pad.  Write down names of people you talk to, part numbers, whatever.  WRITE THINGS DOWN.  Believe me, after a few weeks you can't remember anything.  I try and organize things together, but after a while the notepad just starts getting full, so do whatever works for you, but write things down, and keep them together. 

2.)  Document anything and everything. Take pictures!  Never know what picture you might take or note you may make that will help you later.  I've been turning wrenches for over 20 years, and I hardly ever used to take many pictures.  I still don't need to for mechanical things, but I took a lot of pics of the old wiring harness before I took it out on this job...... damn sure glad I did.  New harness was awesome!  (Porch Electric)  But some of the wires changed color, and so I couldn't just match things up by the wiring diagram.  Sure was glad I had pics!  Helping with routing it too.  New harnesses don't exactly come pre "bent".  

3.)  Keep all the old parts until the job is done, or the new parts are in and working.  Seals, gaskets, old broken parts..... keep it all.  Get a box.  Now, for me, things like gaskets I don't save, but some people have issues with that kind of thing, so it can help.  Seals and such, I keep until I get the new one to make sure it matches up.  If I'm doing an overhaul, once the new engine is together and runs, parts all go in the scrap bin and the dumpster.  (More on this later.)

4.)  Box and label parts or at least organize them.  Even as a tech, I'll do this.  Just a box with "like" parts together.  I buy ziplock bags at the dollar store and write on them with a marker certain parts, bolts, ect so I know where they go.  Paper tags with a wire are nice too.  Mark things "left" and "right" if there is.  

5.)  Clean parts as you assemble them!  Don't clean a bunch of stuff and leave it laying out.  Lots of dust in the air you can't see.  

6.)  BE CLEAN!!!  Stop and clean the shop as it gets dirty.  Sweep up the dirt falling off the machine you're taking apart.  Use oil dry.  Keep the workbench clean.  Don't stack junk up, don't stack parts you take off on the workbench.  Pile part up in neat piles, or in boxes.  Don't haphazardly throw things in different spots.  Don't be afraid to stop, push the thing out and power wash it.  Do power wash things.  Do make sure to cover up anything that can't get water in it, but wash things while it's apart and you can get into things you normally can't. 

7.)  Put decals on after the paint is dry.  Don't wait until you use the machine a few times.  It really sucks having to get it clean enough to stick decals on.  Put the decals on BEFORE you use it.  Put them on BEFORE you mount up a bunch of stuff in the way......like hydraulic lines and exhaust stacks!  (Dang it.....)

8.)  Take your time.  If you get to the point you don't care and just want it to be done.....don't let the job get to you.  Take a break from it.  Do it right the first time.  Walk away.  Walk away for a month if that's what it takes.  Do it right the first time, and be happy always.  Rush a job, and you'll hate it worse doing it over. 

9.)  Big jobs cost money.  Get that into your head before you start.  Probably going to cost twice (or more) than you think it will.  Get a number, and double it.  Make sure you're ok with spending that much.  Cut corners (financially) ONLY on things that can be easily changed..... like tires, mufflers, or cosmetics.  DON'T skimp on poor quality work or internal parts.

10.)  When the job is done, and you are happy.  CLEAN OUT THE SHOP!  Don't save a bunch of broken and wore out parts "just in case".  Wore out and broken parts are just wore out and broken.  Toss them.  You can always find another part.  If you can't, make a new one or fix the whatever it was.  You don't need an old barn full of used bad parts.  

 

Have fun, and thanks for following along! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

..very interesting project.......followed your endeavours the  whole way...as I am sure many others have......

..looking forward to your next major   refurbishment    project :)....Thankyou  for taking us along...

Mike

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

VERY nice!   I can spend hours getting mechanical or wiring systems right, but run outta patience once it works---but find very little time to spend on paint, etc.   (There is a reason for that, see later comment).   

One more suggestion looking at your pictures...I had a lot of trouble with small birds building nests inside the cab air intakes.  They would pack the area around the filters with nest material.  I tried to pack a plastic bag in the openings while the tractor was sitting, the birds would pull them out shred them, and use them as nest filler!    I finally took some coarse stainless steel mesh (cannibalized a wire mesh "basket" from the kitchen) and bent a piece to fill the gap on the bottom of the plastic covers.  I used some 4-40SS hardware to bolt it to the covers.   End of problem.  I'd hate to see a newly cleaned out system get full of that kind of crap.

 Back when I was in high school & college, I completely tore down and rebuilt our '68 Olds.  Family car we had had since '69, lots of memories.   I spent a lot of time doing body work, repainting it the OEM blue/green metallic.  Finished it over Christmas break, and took it to college my sophomore year.  Pulled in to college, dropped of my bags, and drove up to the gym.  Guy was pushing snow in the lot...didn't even look...put it in reverse and backed straight into the front of my car.  Buckled the hood and bent everything else in the front.  I had to find a new hood , bumper, etc, and repaint.   Since then, I just have never been able to care enough to put that much work into any car/tractor/etc to make it pretty.  (Its just gonna get broken....)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, we may have to do something about the cabin air filter area.  So far, it hasn't been an issue.  Tractor sits inside when it's not being used, and gets to a shed when it rains.  None of our tractots, and almost none of our equipment sits out.  

 

I'm the same way on my projects Jeff.  I'm a mechanic, not a body guy.  I can do body and paint very good, I just hate it!!  I've got like 20 Cub Cadets, and I've fixed up several.... mechanically.  None have been painted, lol! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Thank you very much for sharing this project with us here! I am much the same when I do work too and I really appreciate your attention to detail and great workmanship! I have always been interested in these tractors but have never seen one in person yet.  I am a long time IH construction tech and have done a lot of work on the V800’s, they are one my favourite engines and sound great with a straight pipe. They were used in TD20E crawlers, 550 wheel loaders and some scrapers. Most of my experience is in the crawlers, they are a really tough built machine that stands up excellent in logging work. I have found it is very important to service the cooling system regularly and use the Cummins test kit to keep the chemistry at proper levels. They do have a problem as the hours accumulate with cavitation erosion in the lower sleeve counter bores and top seal grooves in the sleeves. I saw a couple that had holes almost eroded through the sides of the sleeves on the major thrust side. 
Im wondering what kind of diffs are in those axles, IH used a lot of Rockwell’s in construction and logging equipment and the brake caliber could have come from that division too.                                                I will be going back to IA next week to finish an 817 rebuild in a TD25C that has a big tile plow on the back. For any ag guys here who need tiling done, please consider having it done by this outfit, genuine IH power! See my post on this machine. 
I am looking forward to doing a lot of traveling next summer and would love to see and hear this tractor working. Again, thanks a bunch for all the work you put into sharing this with us here too! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/17/2019 at 11:56 PM, J-Mech said:

Quick note, there are several things I am now realizing that I don't have pictures of, so I will just talk about them real quick. 

I already mentioned the rear speaker panel.  I think there were like 4 bolts that held it in place originally.  Now it has.... too many.  Like 11 I think.  But I don't want that thin metal to ring.  More bolts the better.  Remember, we are going to add Dynamat to the cab, so we'll put some on the back of that panel to keep it from ringing.  

I also ground off the nuts on the top of the cab... what was left of them.  I'm assuming that's how they moved it around in the factory.  We got 4 forged eye bolts rated at 2200#.  Drilled though the top of the cab and through the ROPS supports.  I the eye bolt was installed from the top, and welded on top all the way around.  Then the stem was welded to the ROPS tube from inside and cut off with only a nub left.  Now we have 4 lifting points up top that will 1.) Not rot away and 2.) keep us from scratching the new paint when installing the cab.  The eye's are relatively small, so they won't cause any other issues.  

Any nuts that were had to access were welded on.  Like the ones that hold the seat in.  The front panel that holds the HVAC fan used self tapping bolts into a 14ga panel.... As if they still bit into anything.  Those holes were drilled to 1/4" and nuts welded on the back side.  Also, a small piece of strap was added between the two boxes for the cab filters to help stiffen up that front HVAC box.  Lots of small things like this were done, and I'm sure not nearly enough things were considered.  

A triangular "shelf" was made on the LH side of the seat.  It angles from the door to the back of the cab.  We will have a piece of plywood upholstered and bolt it on as a "buddy" seat.  The passenger will have to sit sideways with one leg behind the seat.  Got that idea from the neighbor who did the same in the Steigers for kids of wives to ride.  Not a big area.... but it's better than sitting on the floor or on a bucket, lol.  

 

Moving on.... 

So, now on the part so many were waiting to see.  The console.  I want to start out by saying that this isn't what I wanted to do, although my personal preference for a design would end up in appearance the same..... just much different in function.  And it would have been much, MUCH simpler to build.  But.... I'm not the owner, so this is what was made.  At the end, I will state how I would have built it, so if any of you want to do something you can consider it.  

It was decided to change the mounting position of the hydraulic valve.  It was also decided that straight linkage would be used.  No offset linkage, no cables, no jackshafts to change directions.... straight linkage from the handles to the spools.  The most difficult part of this design, was figuring out how to seal all this up, and get no oil in the cab... or water and dirt.... in the event of a hydraulic leak.  The console was to be bolted in and removable... or at least as much of it as possible.  So, this is what I built. 

 

20190223_193210.thumb.jpg.e0a92b3ce90dcba10d859b2a78f75d2d.jpg20190309_133913.thumb.jpg.3542b5bc36ad49db157b36c5a36f4f4f.jpg20190309_133941.thumb.jpg.22f454df1f23e64a1e1a0e470b13cbc8.jpg20190309_133957.thumb.jpg.172e170ffd79471b63d9ea2cc6522d5f.jpg20190308_131656.thumb.jpg.904b58011fb36953196bcc030ed7e819.jpg20190309_134033.thumb.jpg.0e82d9649e866fbb591e8ead32956eca.jpg20190309_135143.thumb.jpg.739039ba12833dd86ab8487e20e57c62.jpg20190311_115039.thumb.jpg.484fa379b07a0f3128b0648282ac6834.jpg20190308_112920.thumb.jpg.5b54d1e82b9c7732c2b9d956e32e8a58.jpg20190309_134015.thumb.jpg.98931689219399008b7f0e99eae71199.jpg

 

The back half of the box... the part that is angled is open to the outside as you can see.  It is welded to the cab.  The console top can be removed, as can the levers, linkage and retangular front half of the console.  There is a panel that divides and cover the top section where the actuating rods go through the box.  Once the top of the console is taken off, you can remove it and it splits around the grommets that seal up where the rods to through so that they can be removed.  The angled box keeps any oil that may leak out of the valves from running into the cab, and the angle is steep enough that water, dirt and oil will run down and out.  Overall, I'm happy with what was built... although there is an issue with it that wasn't discovered until it was done.  If you see it..... we'll just have to deal with it.  If you don't see the problem, I'm not pointing it out, lol.  (Although if you guess, I'll admit it.)  

You can also see in a couple of pics that the parking brake lever was moved to the RH side of the seat.  It's more out of the way now.  

 

 

So.... Here's how I wanted to build it.  I would have built the console pretty much as it appears, only the valve would have been left in it's original position, or moved to the center of the rear of the cab.  All linkage holes would have been welded shut.  The valves would have been cable operated and the cables run thought the bottom of the cab and routed back up to the spools which would have been pointed down.  A simple angle iron bracket welded on the cab for the cable mount on the outside, and the console could either have been bolted or welded in.  Less linkage to build, no worry of oil, dirt or water entering the cab.  Much, much simpler to have built.  If anyone copies this, I'll take $100, lol.  If you guys have any questions, feel free to ask.  

 

I am thinking about using a cable operated valve stack on our 4366. It would slightly reduce the whine in the cab possibly. I will probably mount the valve lower than the factory location and I will be adding a valve with 5 spools so I have 4 remotes and the 3pt. I will move the controls front to add some comfort 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, bitty said:

I am thinking about using a cable operated valve stack on our 4366. It would slightly reduce the whine in the cab possibly. I will probably mount the valve lower than the factory location and I will be adding a valve with 5 spools so I have 4 remotes and the 3pt. I will move the controls front to add some comfort 

Sounds like a good idea!  

This cab doesn't have any whine in it.  Maybe due to the different valve mounting.  Maybe due to the added insulation.  Don't know, but I'm happy with the noise level in the cab!  With a decibel meter app on my phone, it says between 75 and 78 decibels.  I'd say that's about right.  (It's an app, so I'm sure it isn't totally accurate, but that's a good ballpark.)

After putting about 150 hours on this 4586 this year, here are some things I would have done differently:   

*I would have made the controls a little farther forward, even if it blocked the door.  We never use it anyway.  This tractor has a swivel seat, and when turned left, the controls are a bit too far back and hard to reach. 

*I wish the valve stack had been mounted center of cab, and not on the right side.  Hoses flex too much and have to be too long mounted on the right of the cab.  If you're doing a cable valve, I strongly suggest moving the valve to the center of the cab. 

*I would have made the valve stack cable operated. The linkage works fine, but it would have been better on cable. 

*I wish I would have moved the throttle to the right hand console like I originally wanted to do.  When running it, it's too far away.  The decel pedal would be fine to use, but it's in a horrible spot too, and you can't hardly reach it.  I may make a different pedal set up on it this winter.  

 

Make sure to show us what you come up with @bitty I want to see it. Good luck!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/5/2019 at 10:55 PM, rocko592018 said:

Im wondering what kind of diffs are in those axles, IH used a lot of Rockwell’s in construction and logging equipment and the brake caliber could have come from that division too.

IH used the rear end section from a 66/86 series tractor for the axles and differential.  Diff is the same as the tractors.  Pinion shaft is different, but only in that it hooks to a driveshaft yoke and not another trans shaft.  So, it unfortunately is specific to the IH 4wd tractors, and NLA from CIH. 

 

 

On 11/5/2019 at 10:55 PM, rocko592018 said:

I am looking forward to doing a lot of traveling next summer and would love to see and hear this tractor working.

If you are ever in Illinois between Effingham and the Indiana line, send me a PM.  We are south of US 70, south of Casey, IL.  I'm sure everyone would be glad to have you stop in to see it. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, thanks, again never dealing with one of these, interesting to learn.  
For sure, I want to go up to the railroad museum in Green Bay WS too. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/7/2019 at 12:20 AM, J-Mech said:

Here's some advice for guys who do big jobs like this, or a restoration job that may take months or years:

(In no particular order at all.)

1.) Go buy a spiral notebook, or a legal pad just for the job.  Make all your notes in this pad.  Write down names of people you talk to, part numbers, whatever.  WRITE THINGS DOWN.  Believe me, after a few weeks you can't remember anything.  I try and organize things together, but after a while the notepad just starts getting full, so do whatever works for you, but write things down, and keep them together. 

2.)  Document anything and everything. Take pictures!  Never know what picture you might take or note you may make that will help you later.  I've been turning wrenches for over 20 years, and I hardly ever used to take many pictures.  I still don't need to for mechanical things, but I took a lot of pics of the old wiring harness before I took it out on this job...... damn sure glad I did.  New harness was awesome!  (Porch Electric)  But some of the wires changed color, and so I couldn't just match things up by the wiring diagram.  Sure was glad I had pics!  Helping with routing it too.  New harnesses don't exactly come pre "bent".  

3.)  Keep all the old parts until the job is done, or the new parts are in and working.  Seals, gaskets, old broken parts..... keep it all.  Get a box.  Now, for me, things like gaskets I don't save, but some people have issues with that kind of thing, so it can help.  Seals and such, I keep until I get the new one to make sure it matches up.  If I'm doing an overhaul, once the new engine is together and runs, parts all go in the scrap bin and the dumpster.  (More on this later.)

4.)  Box and label parts or at least organize them.  Even as a tech, I'll do this.  Just a box with "like" parts together.  I buy ziplock bags at the dollar store and write on them with a marker certain parts, bolts, ect so I know where they go.  Paper tags with a wire are nice too.  Mark things "left" and "right" if there is.  

5.)  Clean parts as you assemble them!  Don't clean a bunch of stuff and leave it laying out.  Lots of dust in the air you can't see.  

6.)  BE CLEAN!!!  Stop and clean the shop as it gets dirty.  Sweep up the dirt falling off the machine you're taking apart.  Use oil dry.  Keep the workbench clean.  Don't stack junk up, don't stack parts you take off on the workbench.  Pile part up in neat piles, or in boxes.  Don't haphazardly throw things in different spots.  Don't be afraid to stop, push the thing out and power wash it.  Do power wash things.  Do make sure to cover up anything that can't get water in it, but wash things while it's apart and you can get into things you normally can't. 

7.)  Put decals on after the paint is dry.  Don't wait until you use the machine a few times.  It really sucks having to get it clean enough to stick decals on.  Put the decals on BEFORE you use it.  Put them on BEFORE you mount up a bunch of stuff in the way......like hydraulic lines and exhaust stacks!  (Dang it.....)

8.)  Take your time.  If you get to the point you don't care and just want it to be done.....don't let the job get to you.  Take a break from it.  Do it right the first time.  Walk away.  Walk away for a month if that's what it takes.  Do it right the first time, and be happy always.  Rush a job, and you'll hate it worse doing it over. 

9.)  Big jobs cost money.  Get that into your head before you start.  Probably going to cost twice (or more) than you think it will.  Get a number, and double it.  Make sure you're ok with spending that much.  Cut corners (financially) ONLY on things that can be easily changed..... like tires, mufflers, or cosmetics.  DON'T skimp on poor quality work or internal parts.

10.)  When the job is done, and you are happy.  CLEAN OUT THE SHOP!  Don't save a bunch of broken and wore out parts "just in case".  Wore out and broken parts are just wore out and broken.  Toss them.  You can always find another part.  If you can't, make a new one or fix the whatever it was.  You don't need an old barn full of used bad parts.  

 

Have fun, and thanks for following along! 

There are a lot of good notes in here, that I've learned the hard way. I'm excited to finish up this looong restoration of mine, and get on to the next one because I'm going to be doing just about all of these things, and I'm sure it'll be much less of a nightmare.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Has anybody done or thought about making that console for a 66 series? I use a 766 as our main chore tractor and a side console like that would be the cats a** I think

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I think I've cornered the market on IH 4386's in my area, lol.  Bought one, thought it was cool so I started keeping an eye on them just for fun.  Couldn't help myself on two others when they sold somewhat locally for borderline scrap money.  I plan to make two very nice ones out of the bunch and have the third for parts.  I did some work to the first one last year, nothing major and used it without issue.  The third one is mechanically very good, but cosmetically terrible!  I needed a winter project (like a needed a hole in my head) so I yanked the cab the other day and started gutting it.  I'm going to use this post as my template!  I could use some help already with two things. I ordered a cab kit, floormat, and window seals (for the windows that open) from Fehr.  They did not have the seals for the other windows however (the ones that don't open).  I want to make sure I use the correct seal.  J-Mech, can you tell me where you got yours?  I see they are new in the pics.  Also, should I attempt to put these back in myself or pay a pro?  I watched some videos on YouTube and it doesn't look terrible.

Also, the hydraulic valve stack is a leaking mess.  I would prefer to send it to someone other than my local hydraulic shop.  They are good at making a hydraulic line, and that's about it!  I thought this would be a good time to get that done as well.  Any good recommendations on where to send/take it?  I'm in the Cincinnati area.IMG_5372.thumb.JPEG.a7282c89449d5b745c7dbef240aec1f9.JPEG

IMG_5385.JPEG

IMG_5080.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/9/2022 at 11:53 PM, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I imagine he’ll tell you that you’re an idiot if you have to ask and that whatever your plan is won’t work. 

Sad but true

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...