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Barn pictures

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15 minutes ago, oldtech said:

How old is this barn?  I can't help but notice that it is a barrel roof barn.  These weren't made around here until the 50's.  The curved trusses were developed here in Wisconsin and were strips of 2Xs bent and glued together in that curve.  Is that how this was made?  If its that new was the hay hook still being used in the 50's?  Or is this made differently?  Or is the claim that this was a post war design untrue?  Id really like to see how the trusses are made!

The barn I have pictured has glued rafters. And hay hook built in late 40s maybe 1950 Grandpa still had a team of horses on his sale in 72. 

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3 minutes ago, dale560 said:

The barn I have pictured has glued rafters. And hay hook built in late 40s maybe 1950 Grandpa still had a team of horses on his sale in 72. 

Well the date would be about right.  It would have to be one of the earliest examples!  I dont think Ive ever seen one with the hay tackle in it like that around here but then that wasnt a common system here anyway.  Im just a little surprised to see that rid with a later type barn.  Did they do that a lot where you are?  Ours all have barn hill ramps and side doors so you could drive up into them and pitch it off and floor level.

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The upper barn with the name on it was built when my Grandmother was a teenager. Around 1940. The original burned during the depression.  I have a photograph of grandma and her 2 sisters standing on a stack of the red clay tile bricks used to make the first story. The roof beams are as you describe.  Really neat. When my leg can make the climb into the loft, I will take some photos. Yes, it has a hay hook. It was my Dad's job growing up to drive the little Ford tractor back and forth to operate it with a rope.

The stone block silo visible behind it used to be taller.  My great grandfather knocked it down block by block with a sledge, standing on a 2×8. Then he put a dutchman's cap on it. Was used for oats after that. When dad was young, they would put a wooden extension ladder into a high sided hay wagon. He would climb up and paint the white and touch up the letters with black. No way would he do that now! This barn still has the McCormick Deering vacuum pump from Grandpa's milking days.

The lower barn had doors on either end, so it had 2 drive thru bays. Did away with that when we turned the south end into a Cargill unit for hogs in 1991. It has farrowed and fed out hogs, cattle. Was the summer home for Grandpa's bull, machinery storage and even a place to change engines in a pickup a couple times!  Still has a McCormick IH hay conveyor in the haymow.

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10 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Nothing wrong with that. Sure, it won’t hold machinery but it works for its intended purpose and that’s all that matters. I like the overhang. I would love a setup like that to keep my forge under. 

Yea the overhang is nice. In the summertime we keep an electric scale under there and it’s nice to be in the shade or sitting in a chair to watch the rain come down.

Out of the three stalls the middle one only had concrete, this past fall we poured concrete in the other two and that will be nice to have. This time of year we use the barn for storage so it frees up shop area.  

 

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I have to say the idea of a barrel roof barn goes back much before 1950.My dad had a ranch rented from mid 1960's to later 70's that has a barn with the curved roof and laminated 1 x 6 to form the arch.Some very good pictures at a winerys website Thacher Winery (sorry for my ability does not go to making a link) as they promote it as a wedding venue. I can remember they put aluminum roof on in 1960 or so and that they did it in one day.Seems way faster than I would think but the contractor was noted to have been a tightrope walker with the circus in his youth. 

I had it in my head this barn was built by wheeler dealer Lucky Baldwin who died in 1909. The property has been known as the Kentucky Ranch because Baldwin thought the limestone based soil is much like the BlueGrass country of Kentucky, just not the rain to keep it green all summer. But getting a roof in 1960 suggests it was built near 1930 if not before.

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No existing structure here, my carpenter neighbors built the structure and we did doors, insulation, interior steel, wiring and a 12' square office in corner. This is our lambing barn, run a little over 300 ewes. Main barn built in 08, we added 24' lean on north end last year. 60x100 with 24x100 addition. My wife really enjoys it when it's cold in january/February, she loves her babies!

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Pic from machine shed roof last January and Mrs and her ewes in the addition 

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12 hours ago, ray54 said:

I have to say the idea of a barrel roof barn goes back much before 1950.My dad had a ranch rented from mid 1960's to later 70's that has a barn with the curved roof and laminated 1 x 6 to form the arch.Some very good pictures at a winerys website Thacher Winery (sorry for my ability does not go to making a link) as they promote it as a wedding venue. I can remember they put aluminum roof on in 1960 or so and that they did it in one day.Seems way faster than I would think but the contractor was noted to have been a tightrope walker with the circus in his youth. 

I had it in my head this barn was built by wheeler dealer Lucky Baldwin who died in 1909. The property has been known as the Kentucky Ranch because Baldwin thought the limestone based soil is much like the BlueGrass country of Kentucky, just not the rain to keep it green all summer. But getting a roof in 1960 suggests it was built near 1930 if not before.

Heres a wiki history of this type of barn.  They claim here that it dates to 1916 but I suppose its possible that someone was doing it earlier.  It does say that the early ones were not the glued laminated type shown in dale560's photos but segmented trusses cut with a curve from wider boards and laminated side by side not edge to edge and nailed not glued.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic-arch_barn

I cant find any reference to it on the web but I once heard a talk on barn architecture here were the speaker claimed that the glued bent beam manufacturing technique was developed by the forest products lab at the University of Wisconsin.  It may have been available before WW II but I dont know of any here that were built until after the war.  I have a picture of one we owned for a while near Manawa Wi.  Ill have to scan it and post it later.  We also had one on my dad's place near Mt. Calvary but that one burned down.  Both were built on foundations after the previous barns were destroyed too.  There werent a lot of them built because most farms already had barns and unless you had one burn or get wrecked by a tornado a complete new barn of that type wasnt getting built from scratch.  You did see a fair number of barns with barrel roof additions though.  But the pole barn type truss quickly took over and silos became the preferred method of feed storage instead of baled hay which is the only real use for conventional hay lofts.

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1958560 that sure is a nice setup! We lambed 80 ewes in march and had another 120 show up yesterday set to lamb in about 2 weeks. I'll try and get pics of our barn sometime this week although it's nothing fancy.

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On 2/3/2019 at 11:40 AM, rrr4quality said:

IMG_0208.thumb.JPG.04f8dc2d8405b57d82af969b13f378b6.JPGIMG_2522.thumb.JPG.2ea9f115996d166541e10af875b2d909.JPGIMG_2166.thumb.JPG.253845d5f7da47af11177b01fe081eec.JPGThis is the barn that is on the property we bought a few years ago. It isn't the oldest or neatest around but it is cool. I am working at fixing it up. Please post some of your barn pictures!

Did you do any type of grove or lapping with the boards?

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Built in 1903, Elbert County, Colorado.  Sadly, tornado took it in 2004.  Concrete block, made onsite one at a time.  90x45  On the place I grew up, sister still lives there.

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On 2/6/2019 at 9:02 AM, oldtech said:

early ones were not the glued laminated type shown in dale560's photos but segmented trusses cut with a curve from wider boards.............barn architecture here were the speaker claimed that the glued bent beam manufacturing technique was developed by the forest products lab at the University of Wisconsin

Little bit of personal history here since I stumbled upon this RP subject here.  In 1945 we'd moved north from Lake Park, IA to the farm I grew up on near the Spafford store at Round Lake,  MN.  The barn was fairly new at that time but I don't know for sure when it was built, circa mid-40s tho.  It had the "round roof" (as we knew that terminology) and the rafters were laminated from wider boards as described on here.  But our neighbor's barn had been built a short time later and had the same type of round roof but the rafters were laminated/glued in a far different manner!  Were a product of the Rock Island Lumber Co. (known as RILCO rafters).

Both had a "haymow" and tracked carrier.

best, randy

 

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On 2/4/2019 at 10:21 PM, Eric V Bielke said:

had a volunteer fireman that liked to watch barns burn--he went to jail].  As far as we can tell the were built around 1860. 

Are you in Oswego County? My dad was the President of the department where that guy was. What a nightmare! I remember my dad agonizing whole that was going on, about all the people losing their barns and cattle and crop. It really upset my father when they find out who it was.

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The old barn - built by my Great Grand Father, easily over 100 years old.  Sadly coming down.  Designed for loose hay storage and horses.

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The new barn (almost finished), designed for tractors, drive thru with kicker wagons, park and unload another day.  It's shaping up to be a nice barn - don't know if it will be around 100 years from now...  Haven't towed the 756 to this barn - yet...

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My Cub Cadet barn.  Started as a 12x20 Menards barn kit.....then it got a 6x20 lean to, then.....out of space again, so another 10x20 lean to.  28x20 now

After last addition I decided to make it look like a real barn and add a cupola and wind vane, as well as the cross buck trim all around, and a nice coat of red stain. Makes for a nice conversation piece and a place to store the "mini-farm" toys!

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92F4AB9D-3850-42C3-852B-2A66C39D7915.thumb.jpeg.8f66a72a6838daa7e038e54474059d68.jpegMy new barn that we’ve built over the last year. There are still some final touches that need done (finishing wiring, last minute trim work, etc.). It’s 44x60 with a 20x60 second story. It was built to be able to park up to 6 loaded hay wagons in the center section; hence the full size doors with big strap hinges. 

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55 minutes ago, DPH1256 said:

 Cool barn, are you going to store hay upstairs?

That’s the plan, also in the wings in the back half of the barn. The front is getting set up as my new shop. 

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This is my place. I’m thinking this picture was ‘96(?)

It doesn’t look as nice anymore 😰

’96 was another lifetime ago for me, and there’s been a lot of life since then, most of which I’d rather forget about, or do over.🤬

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On 6/18/2019 at 6:29 AM, Deerfield said:

92F4AB9D-3850-42C3-852B-2A66C39D7915.thumb.jpeg.8f66a72a6838daa7e038e54474059d68.jpegMy new barn that we’ve built over the last year. There are still some final touches that need done (finishing wiring, last minute trim work, etc.). It’s 44x60 with a 20x60 second story. It was built to be able to park up to 6 loaded hay wagons in the center section; hence the full size doors with big strap hinges. 

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Tell me about your door/hinge arrangement.  Is that working out OK?  Your flow - what do you have down?  Crusher run?  Anything underneath it like a plastic sheet?  If so how thick?

Thanks!!!!

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20 minutes ago, leeave96 said:

Tell me about your door/hinge arrangement.  Is that working out OK?  Your flow - what do you have down?  Crusher run?  Anything underneath it like a plastic sheet?  If so how thick?

Thanks!!!!

The reasoning behind the doors and hinges being set up as they are is to utilize the full height and width of the center section of the barn, mostly for the purpose of hay wagons much the same as your new barn. With the wings it would not be possible to have full size slider doors. We had a welding shop custom make the hinges, they are basically just an extra long strap hinge. The two lower hinges on the one side have an additional pivot on them that allows the man door to open as you can see in this pic. I can’t find any better pics of the hinges themselves right now. They are working very well so far. 

The floor is essentially just a millings put in and packed with a plate compactor. There is nothing underneath it we just stripped off the top soil. It’s roughly 6 to 8 inches thick. I put about half that in, packed it and then put in the rest and packed it. My original plan was to use DSA for the floor but I got too good of a deal on the millings. At some point, probably sooner rather than later I will be pouring concrete on top. 

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On 6/17/2019 at 5:02 PM, toyboy said:

Did you do any type of grove or lapping with the boards?

I only overlaped the upper boards over the lower boards. The boards shrunk  up a little bit more after I installed them, but it's a hay barn so I wanted it to breathe.

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