Jump to content

New Holland small square baler recommendations


Recommended Posts

IMHO - some good New Holland balers are the 273, 276, 311, 315 and 316.  Later model 565 is close to the 316 and produced now at the BC5050.  These balers had/have the flow action feeder forks which, IMHO, put New Holland on the map.  I've got a New Holland 68 and it was the first (I believe) with that feeding system and when adjusted and fed right, makes a good square bale.

As far as a thrower, you're kind of locked-in on type with brand.  Yes - NH had a pan kicker and it was a licensed copy of the JD pan kicker with a few small changes.  However, I'm to understand that NH doesn't support this pan kicker anymore?

IMHO - you are on the right track looking at NH and I would add you should look at JD balers from the 336 to new.

I cut my teeth stacking behind a JD 24t and that was a brick making machine.  I've got a JD348 and it's really a fine baler.  It has the pan kicker and what I like about the pan kicker (and I don't own or have ever used a belt thrower) is it gives a high arch to the throw.  You can really place the bales around the wagon, especially up front.  IMHO - JD balers are a bit more forgiving (via packing fork) than NH and we really don't have a banana bale problem with our JD.  We use to have a BIG problem with the NH68 making banana bales, but with adjustment and feeding it correctly, it does fine.

Also, don't forget NH has a 570 and 575 baler - now the BC5060 and 5070 respectively.  Those are hay eating machines.

My opinion were I looking for a baler (and depending on how many bales you're going to put-up), first thing I'd consider is plunger strokes per minute.  The NH 570/575/5060/5070 balers are 93 strokes per minute.  So is the JD 348 and 347 balers.  The 336 through the current 328/338 JD's are 80 strokes per minute.  I believe the NH 276, 315/316/565/5060 balers are 79 strokes per bale.  I think the 311 and 273 are slower - similar to my NH68 which is about 63-65 strokes per minute.

In many ways, it's not about the age of the baler, but condition.  Keeping with NH and JD balers gives you a great source of parts and internet forum support.

I posted this video before, I'll post it again (it's a long video) of our JD348 w/pan kicker at work this past summer.  I will also try to post a video of the trusty NH68 baler at work too.

Good luck!

Here's one with my #1 tractor driver at the helm of my fine MF50 diesel...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a couple of NHs way back in the day and neither would make an actual square bale in anything but alfalfa.  We still put them up because at the time we just hand stacked them.  Once we got a bale wagon, things changed because those demanded nice solid dense square bales and we had a heck of time trying make stacks without breaking bales and/or stacks not forming right.  Had the same trouble when we hauled the neighbor's bales that came out of a NH.  If anybody wants to say the NH balers of today make just as good of bale or better then a Deere I won't doubt you because I have never been around one.  But I wouldn't discount a JD just because they are not as popular.  The fact that JD has been able to keep the same design on the market for 40+ plus years tells you its a good design.  Good luck with whatever baler you get. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

How does NH compare to deere on parts cost? Priced a new knife/wiper arm for a 24t last summer as twine has cut a pretty good groove in both of them. Was $200-250 each. I hauled fil nh 68 or 69 to dealer some years ago and they put a new one on and adjusted it for less than $100 iirc. Think arm was 50 or 60 bucks at that time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/22/2019 at 7:23 AM, TomH said:

I fussed with a #46 for years, got it to tie fairly well but it always would start to miss for one reason or another. Twine knives must be kept super sharp.

Find a NH even a older one like a 273 if its in good shape or a 300 series. Spend time baling instead of screwing around with the knotters on a 46.

 

On 1/22/2019 at 7:29 AM, Matt Kirsch said:

Dad struggled with tying problems on a 430 then a 435 IH for a combined 20 years, then bought the NH 316. It's not perfect but at least you can go out and bale a load of hay with it. The knot isn't as strong as the IH all twine knot but at least it's tied. If they could combine the IH feed system with the NH knotting system, they'd have a perfect baler.

 

I'm noticing a theme here with IH knotters 🤔🙄..........  I know I've had my share of fun with them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/22/2019 at 6:39 AM, bitty said:

We had a New Holland 315 bought new early '80s . Was a decent baler. Our mechanic had a 575 and he said it was awesome. 

You should get a way to unroll the round bales into the square baler during the fall/winter. Fast baling the rounds . End product is the high dollar one. Rounds must be stored inside

 

I actually looked really hard at this and have watched several youtube videos on them.  As nice as it would be to make small squares out of rounds at leisure, my fear is that it would beat the leaves off the alfalfa during the leveling and unrolling.  I have run this idea past a few people and they had the same concern; grass hay, I'm sure wouldn't be a problem.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/22/2019 at 1:41 AM, Reichow7120 said:

The 300 series is a older series than the 500 series. Both were good balers.

We have a 311 with a platform thrower on it. We've had it since new (1986 ive been told) been on the farm ever since I can remember.

 

On 1/22/2019 at 5:21 AM, NNYfarmer said:

Have an older 311 here also. Works good. Wish it had that wide pick up head like the 575. 

I use a rotary take so I can double or triple windrows and make the windrows higher instead of wider and still be able to bale it. 

 

 

On 1/22/2019 at 7:59 AM, ny bill o said:

NH 311 here, too. it has done what I have needed, despite having no shelter for the 25 years before I bought it. I was baling beside my neighbor with his 315 baler (bigger capacity/ one series older), and I could keep up with him. 

 

On 1/22/2019 at 11:29 AM, TP from Central PA said:

Ran everything from a 77 to a 575.........I still think as far as overall best baler was the 311.....

A lot of people like the 311.  What capacity would that be compared to?  IH 45/46/47/420, or larger?

How much of bigger capacity is a 575 than a 311?  A noticeable difference?  Does the 575 make a 16" or 14" bale?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how it would compare to IH balers, but I am sure a 311 would blow all but the last ones out of the water.  I am pretty sure a 575 has a bigger chamber but not sure.  A 311 won't keep up to a 570, but I like the feed on the 311 compared to a 570 unless you need the sports car fast baler.  I am pretty sure a 565 is 311 based, but not 100% sure on that.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a few picked out that I am going to go look at.   I would prefer not to buy something that is on the verge of a major mechanical implosion.  What are the specific New Holland things I should be watching for?  I have heard that the plungers are on rollers that ride in tracks and those could be problematic.  I get the common wear or neglect issues, but are there things to look at that I should take notice of to avoid buying a wore out POS? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cooter said:

I have a few picked out that I am going to go look at.   I would prefer not to buy something that is on the verge of a major mechanical implosion.  What are the specific New Holland things I should be watching for?  I have heard that the plungers are on rollers that ride in tracks and those could be problematic.  I get the common wear or neglect issues, but are there things to look at that I should take notice of to avoid buying a wore out POS? 

For me anyhow, I would prefer to get good bones cheap, and throw money at the knotters, rebuild them, and run it.  It will work, lots of aftermarket guys out there who can supply you with parts to get the job done.  I am sure some hay dogs/springs are probably broken in the chamber on most of them, not hard to fix, but check it out.  Plungers seem to last without issue.  Pickup teeth/guards broken or bent.  About the only thing out of the norm that I can recall was the cross bar from the pickup side to the wagon tongue/chamber side of the rear would bust the weld on the twine box, think I fixed that on 2 of them over the years.  Also the cylinder mount for the thrower on the chamber would bust out, but those seemed to only happen to guys who never cleaned the bales out of the chamber when they were done, and that area had a rust issue.  Not sure if you are looking at one with a thrower, but belts, bearings and shafts for the rollers the belts ride on all need checked out.  Alot of guys run them with bearings out, ruin the shafts and then try to put a new bearing on a junk shaft and causes all kinds of issues.  

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...