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New Holland small square baler recommendations


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Since the corn and bean market prices are soft, I am thinking of expanding my small square bale market.  I do a sizable amount of 4x5 rounds now, but I turn away a lot of horse and small farm people because they don't have a way to handle them.  I picked up a #46 with a #10 thrower that hasn't had much use, but I haven't used it much either.  My fear is that I cannot get it reliable enough without it costing me a bunch of money; it gets expensive to pay people to stand around to watch you work on equipment and have ready hay setting in the field.  They look like the exact same knotters that are on the 45 - which are extremely finicky, to put it lightly, (they suck something awful) so I don't know if I want to deal with that when it's crunch time.  Parts availability is nice too; I bleed red to the core, but it gets old having to go on a used parts hunt if something breaks,  it would be nice to go to the dealer to get what you need to get back in business.

When it comes to hay equipment, New Holland dominates in this area and green paint is a distant second.  We have always had IH equipment, so I am completely unfamiliar with any of the New Holland balers.  Can someone explain the numbering system?  I see 5xx and 3xx a lot, are these the capacity of the balers or series?  What do the last two digits mean?  I want to know what I am looking at by the number.  Like the IH 45, 46, 47, and 420 were the same size bale and capacity; with NH, I have no idea.

The baler needs to have the following criteria:

  • Small bale size - like the IH 45 & 46
  • Must have a thrower - belt or hydraulic
  • $3-5,000 range

Is my price range going to get me a reliable baler?

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1 minute ago, Cooter said:


Since the corn and bean market prices are soft, I am thinking of expanding my small square bale market.  I do a sizable amount of 4x5 rounds now, but I turn away a lot of horse and small farm people because they don't have a way to handle them.  I picked up a #46 with a #10 thrower that hasn't had much use, but I haven't used it much either.  My fear is that I cannot get it reliable enough without it costing me a bunch of money; it gets expensive to pay people to stand around to watch you work on equipment and have ready hay setting in the field.  They look like the exact same knotters that are on the 45 - which are extremely finicky, to put it lightly, (they suck something awful) so I don't know if I want to deal with that when it's crunch time.  Parts availability is nice too; I bleed red to the core, but it gets old having to go on a used parts hunt if something breaks,  it would be nice to go to the dealer to get what you need to get back in business.

When it comes to hay equipment, New Holland dominates in this area and green paint is a distant second.  We have always had IH equipment, so I am completely unfamiliar with any of the New Holland balers.  Can someone explain the numbering system?  I see 5xx and 3xx a lot, are these the capacity of the balers or series?  What do the last two digits mean?  I want to know what I am looking at by the number.  Like the IH 45, 46, 47, and 420 were the same size bale and capacity; with NH, I have no idea.

The baler needs to have the following criteria:

  • Small bale size - like the IH 45 & 46
  • Must have a thrower - belt or hydraulic
  • $3-5,000 range

Is my price range going to get me a reliable baler?

Here you can get a pretty decent square baler for that money because no one wants them. Nephew got one a couple of years ago......I know JD but that baler is selling now for about 5 K. He paid 3500 with a thrower and 3 racks as a package deal from a guy getting out of dairy. So i'd say something in the 3-5K range should get you something that will work. Don't be afraid to expand your search. If an overnight trip will save you a thousand bucks or so?

I think that most of the NH ones made the same sized bales. Just different models. 

 

Good luck.

 

Rick

 

 

 

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The 300 series is a older series than the 500 series. Both were good balers.

We have a 311 with a platform thrower on it. We've had it since new (1986 ive been told) been on the farm ever since I can remember.

Here are some pictures of our 311 in action. 

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Have an older 311 here also. Works good. Wish it had that wide pick up head like the 575. 

I use a rotary take so I can double or triple windrows and make the windrows higher instead of wider and still be able to bale it. 

It will take hay just as fast as you can feed it and keep right on a going.

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We had a New Holland 315 bought new early '80s . Was a decent baler. Our mechanic had a 575 and he said it was awesome. 

You should get a way to unroll the round bales into the square baler during the fall/winter. Fast baling the rounds . End product is the high dollar one. Rounds must be stored inside

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I fussed with a #46 for years, got it to tie fairly well but it always would start to miss for one reason or another. Twine knives must be kept super sharp.

Find a NH even a older one like a 273 if its in good shape or a 300 series. Spend time baling instead of screwing around with the knotters on a 46.

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Somewhere out there I encountered a post outlining the model progression. Can't find it now of course.

At this stage of the game you probably don't want to look at anything older than a 316/326, unless you come across a really mint 315 or 325. As the numbers go up, the capacity of the baler increases.

Most likely you'll be looking at a 5XX series. 565, 570, 575, 580. This seems to cover a lot of years, 88-08 apparently? After that was the BC-series.

Mechanically not much has changed on NH square balers in the last 40 years. Mostly just decals and sheet metal to make them look bigger and more modern.

Dad struggled with tying problems on a 430 then a 435 IH for a combined 20 years, then bought the NH 316. It's not perfect but at least you can go out and bale a load of hay with it. The knot isn't as strong as the IH all twine knot but at least it's tied. If they could combine the IH feed system with the NH knotting system, they'd have a perfect baler.

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If you want to put up hay in a hurry and you want newer 570 or 575 is the way to go. 320 or 326 was a higher capacity baler over the smaller NH 300 series. A 575 I believe is a newer 326. They have about 93 plunger strokes per min. I think the 320 had around 105 strokes per min.  But we run a 575 with 72 thrower and have done about 1800 bales on a good day in roughly 8 hours.  The bad is that you need to keep a consistent windrow and adjust tractor speed especially in lighter 2nd or 3rd cut to keep a consistent bale coming out. 

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NH 311 here, too. it has done what I have needed, despite having no shelter for the 25 years before I bought it. I was baling beside my neighbor with his 315 baler (bigger capacity/ one series older), and I could keep up with him. 

baling second cutting.jpg

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Don't have any modern day small square baler experience as the square baler left the farm in 1980 after 5 yrs of round baling. I was 20 at the time. What I do remember is on the 2 NH sqare balers Dad bought used, the 2nd being a 273, to my knowledge neither one ever required any more than greasing and routine maint and rarely missed a knot

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We did have a 565 growing up. Great baler. If you can stay with the 5xxx series you will probably be better off. Getting one for what you want to spend that ain't wore out might be an issue. Alots gonna depend on how much you plan to put through it. 

We paid about 5 for our 311. Great shape though. Factory paint wasnt even wore off the bars on the pickup head. 

It's just a catch all this time of year though.

KIMG1167.JPG

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Found this on YT magazine.  Can't say if it's accurate but it has some good information.

https://www.yesterdaystractors.com/cgi-bin/viewit.cgi?bd=implment&th=40715

I've stacked thousands of bales behind my Dad's 268.  No speed demon and no super sweep pickup, but it's been very reliable for 30+ years.

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Have a late model 273 with super sweep pickup. It's  been an excellent baler for me. 273 or 311 will be in your price range. I wouldn't by anything that's ran any sort of  preservative. It's getting hard to find good older balers. Couple of neighbors have green balers that seem to work well for them.

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 We have a new Holland 316 we bought new in 1985 it has very good capacity but it has a hard time making a nice perfect bale, if the rows are good and your speed is right it will make a decent bale, but as soon as the size of row changes or your speed changes too fast or too slow the bale will come out tight on one side and loose on the other and in a half moon shape, and if you spend too much time running the baler with no hay going in it will put out a small loose bale. Last summer one of my neighbours called me in a panic, he said he had 4 or 500 bales to make and his baler broke down, so I went over there and baled 475 bales in two hours.  

  I have a cousin who has a 316 also that I rent from time to time and it is a twin to mine, The only other small square baler I’ve had experience with in my lifetime was an international 47 which was a decent baler back in the day. 

My other cousin and a friend of mine each have a 311 which is lower capacity but makes such nice bales compared to my 316. The 311 has a smaller driveline narrower pick up with less teeth on it but in my opinion is a good baler.

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If I couldn't have an inline Hesston I think a New Holland 311,super sweep pickup and the Deere designed(at least they owned the patents)pan kicker would be the cats ass. Especially if I was doing custom or hay for commercial sale. And I square bale (rarely) with an IH 46 and a #10 kicker.

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We have a 565 it is a very dependable baler only issues we've had with it were operator error. Sometimes I wish we had a 575 which has more capacity. I might know where an older new holland is that hasn't been used in quite sometime.

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22 minutes ago, exSW said:

If I couldn't have an inline Hesston I think a New Holland 311,super sweep pickup and the Deere designed(at least they owned the patents)pan kicker would be the cats ass. Especially if I was doing custom or hay for commercial sale. And I square bale (rarely) with an IH 46 and a #10 kicker.

I was on an inline kick for awhile, until a local bought one.......I didn't find it very impressive.  It made nice bales, but so does Deere, and a NH will to if time and money is spent on keeping hay dogs, springs, and chamber knives sharp.  It didn't have the capacity I expected, we ran a 570 in the same field baling straw, 570 out ate it, and in good straw NH's aren't no speed demons.

The main reason I like the 311 was it seemed like they got the plunger speed, feeder, and chamber sized all matched well and it was very reliable, it seemed to me anyhow, you go up to the 315/16 and up again, the increased plunger speed seemed to cause more issues if care isn't given to the machine by the operator.  

If your wanting a thrower, I would not get a older machine with the two rods for thrower speed control.....believe the number was a 54A......we had a 275 with one, compared to the later ones with the crank, or even better electric control, it was pretty crude.

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I think the main attraction of the inlines is maintenance. As in not a lot. Parts however ain't cheap.

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1 hour ago, exSW said:

the Deere designed(at least they owned the patents)pan kicker

Yeah, as you can see from the pictures we have one. Dad said the baler before cured him from ever wanting a belt thrower again. 

I will tell you one thing, getting parts for those New Holland pan kickers is getting hard to come by through New Holland. We ran into a problem a year ago with the hydraulic valve so it wouldn't trip. Part we needed NLA from New Holland and its its not a common part with anything else. Dad knew about the John Deere connection so we ended up at the John Deere dealer. Talk with anyone young about this and they get the deer in the headlights look.  Fortunately for us this dealer has a guy that has been there forever and knew about the connection and with his help we figured out that parts from a Deere 42 thrower will go on a New Holland 75 pan thrower. Got the parts we needed from Deere and we're back in business.

Ours is the electric control of the thrower. No cranks.

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1 hour ago, Reichow7120 said:

Yeah, as you can see from the pictures we have one. Dad said the baler before cured him from ever wanting a belt thrower again. 

I will tell you one thing, getting parts for those New Holland pan kickers is getting hard to come by through New Holland. We ran into a problem a year ago with the hydraulic valve so it wouldn't trip. Part we needed NLA from New Holland and its its not a common part with anything else. Dad knew about the John Deere connection so we ended up at the John Deere dealer. Talk with anyone young about this and they get the deer in the headlights look.  Fortunately for us this dealer has a guy that has been there forever and knew about the connection and with his help we figured out that parts from a Deere 42 thrower will go on a New Holland 75 pan thrower. Got the parts we needed from Deere and we're back in business.

Ours is the electric control of the thrower. No cranks.

I was also under the impression that it is a direct licenced copy of Deere's kicker. They sure are sweet. If you choose to stsck in the kicker wagon a good operator can lay the bale right in the stackers hands.

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Not following the pan kicker over a belt thrower?  I have yet to see a pan on a used baler that isn't welded up here. Guys here that hate belt throwers drove like snails, didn't keep the baler full and burned the twine off the bales because it took forever to get a bale out of the chamber.  

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Agree with the belt thrower being better. We had very little problems with our 315 belt thrower and same with the IH 430? before the NH 

We found that I could bale over 2 times as fast with the 640 silage special than compared to the square baler 

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1 hour ago, TP from Central PA said:

Not following the pan kicker over a belt thrower?  I have yet to see a pan on a used baler that isn't welded up here. Guys here that hate belt throwers drove like snails, didn't keep the baler full and burned the twine off the bales because it took forever to get a bale out of the chamber.  

I don't know what to tell you. Ours is over 30 years old and has never been welded once. Around here that's why if you have a thrower you a older New Holland or a Deere because of the belts.

I don't know what you guys do to brake the pan throwers so bad. We're not babying our stuff and don't have the problems you guys do.

I used to think that us who farmed in Michigan were hard on equipment. Im starting to get the jest that Pennsylvania guys are harder yet. Some of the stuff i read a few guys must be able to brake a anvil with a rubber mallet and then brake the rubber mallet with a playskool hammer.

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