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mader656

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On this date in 1972, Loma, MT set the record for greatest 24-hour temperature change: 103 degrees F. The temperature rose from -54 to 49 degrees F as Chinook winds eroded Arctic air.

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Exact same  day I got released from U.S. Army  active duty. I Made flight  from Philly to Chicago. But connecting flight from Chicago to Madison cancelled because of a bad snow storm. But dad drove down to OHare with my future wife & brought me home , through that storm!                                        

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Years ago I read about a similar extreme temp change, it was somewhere in the Plains.  I believe that one I'm thinking about was a decrease in temp of 60 - 80(?) degrees in just an hour or two(?).  What stuck w/ me was them saying it was so extreme so quickly that it broke window glass.

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1972-73 I saw it change from 88 to 18 in about 30 minutes in Wichita Falls, Texas. Even the locals thought that was extreme and they see drastic weather changes often.

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Few more temp extremes I stole don't know why it's highlighted

The coldest temperature ever recorded in Montana was -70 degrees below zero at Rogers Pass north of Helena, on January 20, 1954. This is also a national record for the lower 48 states. The warmest temperature ever recorded in Montana was 117 degrees at Glendive, July 20, 1893, and at Medicine Lake, on July 5, 1937.

The temperature at Medicine Lake in northeastern Montana reached 117 degrees on July 5, 1937. This tied the all-time temperature for Montana previously established at Glendive on July 20, 1893. Combined with the -70 degrees Fahrenheit at Roger's Pass in 1954, this makes the all-time temperature range recorded in Montana 187 degrees. This is the most extreme temperature range experienced in any of the 50 states.

Map

The greatest temperature change in 24 hours occurred in Loma on January 15, 1972. The temperature rose exactly 103 degrees, from -54 degrees Fahrenheit to 49 degrees. This is the world record for a 24—hour temperature change.

The greatest temperature change in 12 hours happened on December 14, 1924. The temperature at Fairfield, Montana, dropped from 63 degrees Fahrenheit to -21 degrees at midnight. This 84-degree change in 12 hours stands as the greatest 12-hour temperature change recorded in the United States.

The temperature at the Great Falls International Airport on January 11, 1980, rose from -32 degrees Fahrenheit to 15 degrees in seven minutes when Chinook winds eroded an Arctic airmass. The temperature rose 47 degrees in just seven minutes, making it the record for the most rapid temperature change registered in the United States.

 

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Most I've seen in 24 hours is 40 above to 28 below and back to 40 when the chinnock hit.

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In about 1981 or so I saw in the Piecance Basin of NW Colorado 103 Friday afternoon to wake up to 30 and snow Sunday morning.

 

 

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3 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

Seems to me that "climate change" has been happening for awhile now.

12, think about it, where I sit was under 3 miles of ice and snow in the ice age. NYC area they figure about a mile and the the sea level was 300 feet or so lower than today. And then the climate changed.......without any help from man!

 

Rick

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I understood that the coldest temperature recorded in the lower 48 states was at Minot ND.

But you learn something new every day 😃

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On 11/13/2018 at 8:36 AM, mader656 said:

On this date in 1972, Loma, MT set the record for greatest 24-hour temperature change: 103 degrees F. The temperature rose from -54 to 49 degrees F as Chinook winds eroded Arctic air.

That is bloody cold for mid Nov. , I am a bit surprised that a major Chinook could find it's way down that gorge and be that effective.

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51 minutes ago, IKS said:

That is bloody cold for mid Nov. , I am a bit surprised that a major Chinook could find it's way down that gorge and be that effective.

That's cold anytime of the year.

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11 hours ago, oldtanker said:

12, think about it, where I sit was under 3 miles of ice and snow in the ice age. NYC area they figure about a mile and the the sea level was 300 feet or so lower than today. And then the climate changed.......without any help from man!

 

Rick

Exactly, Mother Nature has way more power over the weather. Pretty arrogant of humans to think that we are capable of affecting the weather. 

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And i thought Missouri weather was prone to change.

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6 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

Exactly, Mother Nature has way more power over the weather. Pretty arrogant of humans to think that we are capable of affecting the weather. 

EXACTLY 

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I believe it was 1967, we went to bed with the furnace cranked as high as it would go, it was 40 below at sunset. By sunup the chinook had shot it up to 40 above! The house was so hot we thought it was afire! No thermostat on the old fuel burner, just a knob on the carburetor.

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8 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

Exactly, Mother Nature has way more power over the weather. Pretty arrogant of humans to think that we are capable of affecting the weather.

I respect your personal opinion but honestly I'm speechless in responding to IMHO to what I consider your lack of understanding of how human activity can effect the world on which we live.

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8 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

Exactly, Mother Nature has way more power over the weather. Pretty arrogant of humans to think that we are capable of affecting the weather. 

 

2 hours ago, Ihfan4life said:

EXACTLY 

Yup. How far are we from the sun and it can warm us up daily just by the rays of sunshine shining on us 

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2 minutes ago, bitty said:

 

Yup. How far are we from the sun and it can warm us up daily just by the rays of sunshine shining on us 

And........

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21 hours ago, oldtanker said:

12, think about it, where I sit was under 3 miles of ice and snow in the ice age. NYC area they figure about a mile and the the sea level was 300 feet or so lower than today. And then the climate changed.......without any help from man!

 

Rick

I read an article a while back, that said that Lake Winnipeg is still rising (literally, the ground is still recovering from the ice age, and rising) , about 1 inch per year, and it may not be too long before the Red River of the north could reverse course and flow south into Lake Traverse, in South Dakota, then break into Big Stone lake, and flow down the Minnesota River and join into the Mississippi, then on to New Orleans.

That would be an epic canoe trip...Lake Winnipeg, to the Big Easy.

Mike

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2 hours ago, Atilathehun99 said:

I respect your personal opinion but honestly I'm speechless in responding to IMHO to what I consider your lack of understanding of how human activity can effect the world on which we live.

Oh I am aware that we can affect things. We had smog in Cali and acid rain, but we have made huge improvements in our pollution and things are much better. What concerns me cost versus benefits. For example let's say that the first 90% of reduction cost a small amount, the last 10% will cost comparatively much more. When we impose ever stricter regulations, our compliance cost will increase exponentially. Subsidizing green energy drives up the cost of the other sources and makes us more reliant on less reliable sources. We can't control the weather, so we can't control the capacity of solar or wind energy. We can control coal, nuclear and natural gas capacity. You're just the most recent in a long line of people I have left speechless... I just don't believe that we can affect things as much as you think we can. As I said, pretty arrogant IMHO to think that we are solely responsible for the changes we may see. My guess would be - human influence 10-20% mother nature 80-90%

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2 hours ago, Atilathehun99 said:

I respect your personal opinion but honestly I'm speechless in responding to IMHO to what I consider your lack of understanding of how human activity can effect the world on which we live.

OK, lets go with your notion. Lets start the diesel particulate matter issue pursued by the EPA when they push through the TIER IV mandate. Where is the evidence? The EPA's evidence was a claim with NO physical evidence to back it up. The claim? "That in the late 50's and early 60's diesel particulate matter killed thousands of children in the US". They could not produce one autopsy report to back up that claim. Not one. They never explained why when diesels were not that common where that particulate matter came from. Diesel farms tractors, light construction equipment, light, medium were almost exclusively gas burners at the time as were school buses. So they flat out lied. Several so called prominent climate scientist were caught faking data about the earths temperature. Light and medium trucks/buses/construction equipment didn't really embrace diesel until 1974 during the fuel embargo.

Well guess what Einstine? At one time the polar ice caps where much smaller than they are now. Long before man affected anything. That is a known. Then without mans help the Ice Age hit. Again without mans help the climate changed again and the ice receded. They know that the earth was warmer than right now at one time. SO just what are you worried about?

Besides if we are going to take pollution on as a serious issue then were need to make Russia, China, most of Asia, India, the Mid East, most of the former Soviet states, all of Africa and all of Mexico and south America greatly reduce pollution they create. You are not going to really reduce world wide pollution by cutting pollution in Canada, the US and most of developed Europe. Even reducing it to zero would hardly make a dent in anything. All that would do would be to destroy the economies in those places. So seeing as the undeveloped nations are not going to reduce pollution unless forced to what do you think we should do? Or I should ask where should be invade first so that we can take over and force them to reduce their pollution levels. Allowing them to continue polluting like mad is not going to help their economies. All that does is put more money in the factory owners pockets with no incentives to fix anything. They are not going to via free will do anything that reduces profit or cost money. An embargo is only going to kill those who are laid off and have no source of income as they die of starvation. So forcing them to fix it is the only way and the only way to do that is to invade, conquer them and force them into compliance. 

So how do you propose to fix this in a meaningful way? Solar and wind are at the present not practical. People are too scared of nuclear. So how do we keep doing what we are doing, providing the electricity needed for our homes and factories without adversely effecting jobs? Cause the alternative is to start "eliminating" human beings.

 

Rick  

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On 11/14/2018 at 3:30 PM, oldtanker said:

12, think about it, where I sit was under 3 miles of ice and snow in the ice age. NYC area they figure about a mile and the the sea level was 300 feet or so lower than today. And then the climate changed.......without any help from man!

 

Rick

Not NYC but interesting, particularly the sea level rise at the end.

"Glaciers on the move: Two minutes of extreme climate change on Swiss Alps, Italian beaches"

http://joannenova.com.au/2018/11/two-minutes-of-extreme-climate-change-on-swiss-alps-italian-beaches/

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