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Ether....where to buy?


Coytee

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Looks to me like the (empty) can of ether sitting in the 1066 is smaller and different than what I can go to the store and buy.

Where to I find stubby cans of ether that would work?  (or is the holder for it more adjustable than it appears to me??)

 

 

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Been there...  so far, nobody has short cans.  I just hung up with my local Kubota dealer, he said he had them and "come on in"  but further discussion he said hold the horses, "you're looking for the HALF can's and I an't seen them in a LOOOOOONG time"

Never thought it would be such a challenge to find a can of ether.

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12 minutes ago, mmi said:

1/2 cans at 2x the $.....?

7.2 oz cans at Farm and Home Supply store in Bismarck ND $1.50.   Larger cans (12 oz ?) I think $1.89.

Local Coop ( Farmers Union)  $2.15 and $2.59

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Well....let me ask the question....

Will a full sized can fit in my holder?  I've not really looked at it but on a glance, it looks like it only holds the half cans.

Is it adjustable and I didn't realize it?

As an aside....how much ether does it really use to start?  (tractor is new to me but shouldn't see TOO much use during winter if other tractor is a good barameter, it's usually the backhoe I take out since it's a bit more useful)

I would have thought a half can would last me a couple years.  (I've never used it so have no idea how quickly it gets used up)

 

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15 minutes ago, twood19541 said:

I believe John Deere has one of the highest percentage of either.  They need too because JD start so hard.  

Was always told JD and NAPA was the best.  However NAPA sells 2 types.

I buy the NAPA and works good for the puller.  Dad buys the CNH for his tractors.

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size would depend on holder  most are clamp or bail /crank /screw  of fixed size   then they are single clamp   like an old freon can   once open they need used up

you will likely only need a 3 second hit once cranking   then 0-3   1 sec  hit to keep running       should last 5-6 years if seals good  but they are suppose to be redB)

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3 hours ago, Coytee said:

As an aside....how much ether does it really use to start?  (tractor is new to me but shouldn't see TOO much use during winter if other tractor is a good barameter, it's usually the backhoe I take out since it's a bit more useful)

Being an IH, as long as it's not totally whooped, it should start with no ether as long as the batteries are good. Our 1486 probably has 800 hours since I completely rebuilt the engine, and head the head gone through. It will start without being plugged in down to 10 degrees, maybe colder but I've never tried it, after only a couple turns of the engine. I don't make a habit of starting them like that ever, but sometimes, you gotta do what you gotta do to get something done. Now, on the other hand, our old 1066 has worn out 3 or 4 tachs, and probably has 30,000 hours on it. We have had it for probably 30 years and it's never been rebuilt in that time, so she's getting a little tired, although it will still do whatever we ask of it. Since she's a little tired, if you open the throttle 2/3 of the way, and start cranking it, it'll usually take off pretty good down to about 30 or 35° F, then just cut the throttle back to an idle immediately as soon as it catches when it's cranking. Most of the DT414, 436, and 466's are very good cold starters without assistance, but I'm sure there's a few out there that are a little different than the norm. I don't know if it's true or not, but I've heard of a few of the old xx20, xx30, and xx40 series JD's that would allegedly start on their own without ether. Never saw them, but a buddy has some that he says will...

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1 hour ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Last time I looked, on the shelf at Tractor Supply.

That was one of the first places I went.  Unless the salesperson working there didn't know about it....  when I asked, he led me right to the "auto" ether...  he said that was all they had.  Since I had/have no clue, I can't argue (especially since I went up/down each isle on my own and didn't find any)

I was perplexed with that...  I don't live in "farm" territory....  so maybe they don't stock it geographically....but there ARE farms here, so I don't get it.

 

(shrugs shoulders)

 

 

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47 minutes ago, John cub owner said:

Have you checked your NAPA store if there is one in your area.  I was getting a can and saw they had the short ones on the shelf.

Yep...  same story as TSC.  Guy took me to "auto" starting fluid & said that's all he had.

Fortunately, the JD dealer has it.  If the can is green, red (my existing, empty can is white), I don't care.  Heck....it could have polka-dots on it and it wouldn't bother me!

Now I just have to figure out when I'm heading in that direction (it's opposite my beaten path)

 

 

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I gotta agree with rbootsmi dt's are good at starting in cold weather with good batteries and a block heater. if I'm not mistaking you said in another post your down in Tennessee I'm just north of you in Kentucky and we haven't bought a can of ether in years if it gets below 35 we will plug in the block heater but some don't even need that. You may get a can just in case but I was taught not to use it unless it was a last ditch effort 

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My 1086 has the same can of ether in the holder that was in it when I bought it over 20 years ago... I have never had to use ether to start it.... if I need to use the tractor, and it’s below freezing temps, which is most of the winter in Northern Canada, I plug in the block heater for a few hours and it will fire right up... pretty sure it would start at much colder temps without being plugged in, but i believe it’s just so much easier on the engine to have that block warmed up some ..

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9 hours ago, north of 60 said:

My 1086 has the same can of ether in the holder that was in it when I bought it over 20 years ago... I have never had to use ether to start it.... if I need to use the tractor, and it’s below freezing temps, which is most of the winter in Northern Canada, I plug in the block heater for a few hours and it will fire right up... pretty sure it would start at much colder temps without being plugged in, but i believe it’s just so much easier on the engine to have that block warmed up some ..

EXACTLY!  Plug the block heater in for 2-3 hours and take the chill off the engine you need to start and save all the additional wear of rinsing the oil off your liners and pistons with ether cranking a cold engine.

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13 hours ago, 88power said:

I gotta agree with rbootsmi dt's are good at starting in cold weather with good batteries and a block heater. if I'm not mistaking you said in another post your down in Tennessee I'm just north of you in Kentucky and we haven't bought a can of ether in years if it gets below 35 we will plug in the block heater but some don't even need that. You may get a can just in case but I was taught not to use it unless it was a last ditch effort 

Yes, I'm outside of Knoxville (Greenback).  Realistically, a block heater won't be an option for me.  Machine will be parked too far from power.  The condition of the machine suggests it's always been under cover.  No apparent drips/leaks (of virtually any kind which was one of the appeals to me) and the tach (if accurate) is somewhere around (if I recall) 3,800 hours.  The existing battery however, is clearly long in the tooth.  Once I get a fresh battery on it, I might be surprised on how fast it might turn over and start.

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Just had a thought hit me....  can a block heater be powered using a solar charger type setup?

If no, fine, end of question.

If yes, then if you left it in while not in use (say 10 weeks during winter) would that cause any issues?  (I'd have to presume that would NOT be anyone's first choice of circumstance)

The tractor will realistically get little use during winter.  I have a hydraulic (not shaft driven) 15' batwing mower that will be attached to it and putting the mower on/off will take longer than a shaft type mower because of the pump that has to be mounted on the pto area.  Consequently, during winter months, I don't see going out there to use it (of course, mower could be removed "now" and put back on in spring which would free up tractor)

Still...  I've got a full sized industrial JCB backhoe (1550B) that is pretty handy unless I need some 3-point work.  Tractor has zero attachments other than mower (it was put together as a dedicated "lawn mower" for the farm.  Even if a big tree falls across road.....  backhoe will usually be my goto since I can push pull and lift with it.

 

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