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Not for the BTOs out there

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11 minutes ago, Ron Cook said:

You sure you don"t mean Case??  I must have tied a million bales sittin' there in that dust and chaff.  I never saw a New Holland hand tie.  Of course I never saw a New Holland anything until I was long gone off the farm.

Ron

I have a NH history magazine and and the first baler they sold was the self tying twine baler invented by Edwin Nolt. 

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27 minutes ago, Ron Cook said:

You sure you don"t mean Case??  I must have tied a million bales sittin' there in that dust and chaff.  I never saw a New Holland hand tie.  Of course I never saw a New Holland anything until I was long gone off the farm.

Ron

Funny you should mention Case. When we moved here in 72 there area ton of JD and IH dealers around. One tiny Case dealer in what looked like a 2 car garage and a couple of AC dealers that were kinda small. The MF dealer was way out of the way and by 73 was out of business. Oh yea one small Ford dealer who only carried tractors because Ford forced them on him. 

 

A lot of the time the engineers hands are tied too. The head office what an item, gotta be within this margin to design, produce and make to meet a price point. So the engineers do what they are told. After all they are an employee and the top dogs often listen to the bean counters before they listen to the engineer.

 

Rick

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Hay KWRB  the lighting a fire under the crankcase was even done in sunny California. Maybe not by the time frame your talking of, but in the hand crank days of such things as Fordson. But that was not the only brand from things I have heard. A lot of years we don't get lower than 20 degrees F, I have only seen single digit temps once in 60+ years. 

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21 hours ago, oldtanker said:

 So many lawsuits were filed against AC over injuries caused by that baler that AC got completely out of the baler market in 74 when they stopped production of the rotor-baler.

 

Was there something that made the Roto-balers more hazardous than others?  Never been around one to know.

Howard

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5 hours ago, Ron Cook said:

sure you don"t mean Case??

Boy-oh-boy, wish now that I could ask someone but the thought suddenly occurred to me that they're all gone.  And yeah, I sure do remember also the Case balers, guess that you'd know what I'm talking about when I thought of mentioning those wood "blocks".

Chuckle, guess what I recall the most was trying to start one of those d----ed Wisconsin V-4s!

best, randy

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5 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

self tying twine baler invented by Edwin Nolt

Remembering the "knotter" and the "cutter".

best, randy

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We ran Roto-balers for about 20 years and never had much trouble with them.  One thing I remember was that you could bale half the night if the dew didn't get too heavy.  I heard that that the square balers had to have their alfalfa pretty dry or it wouldn't work well.  And if you got a rain on a round bale it would shed the moisture with very little damage to the hay. The square bales tended to take on more water so you wanted to get them off the field ASAP.  

    

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2 hours ago, Howard_P said:

Was there something that made the Roto-balers more hazardous than others?  Never been around one to know.

Howard

Not really sure what the problem was but I found that info on an AC site. So there had to be something. And this is what I foundBut the Roto-Baler soon proved to be a dangerous machine. When the machine’s tying system failed, the operator would get off the tractor to get the twine back in place when the conveyor shut off, as it did on each bale. If the operator didn’t shut off the PTO, the conveyor would start again while the farmer was working, and it would take off arms and legs, or worse, sometimes resulting in fatalities. Another thing I found was that the roto balers were difficult to adjust to make them work right and difficult to keep them in adjustment.

The idea of the round baler was spawned around the year 1890 from an idea of rolling straw chaff into logs for fuel, which the Luebben Family of Sutton, Nebraska, is credited for devising. Hugh Luebben and his sons, Ummo and Melchior, worked on a machine that made straw logs for prairie dwellers to burn as fuel in the winter. AC later bought the rights to the idea.

Total AC built and sold about 75,000 roto balers from all production runs. IIRC between 47 and 1950 NH sold 4 or 5 times that number and the model 76 had "auto tie".

Thing that puzzles me is the roto balers claim to fame was that they shed water better than square bales. But back in the good old days most farmers stacked the square bales in haymow and shedding water wasn't an issue. At least that's how it was here.

 

Rick

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28 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

Thing that puzzles me is the roto balers claim to fame was that they shed water better than square bales. But back in the good old days most farmers stacked the square bales in haymow and shedding water wasn't an issue. At least that's how it was here.

Same-oh!  Concur totally.

best, randy

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Think the shedding water thing was more an advertising thing but also if it rained before you got them picked up you didnt lose much hay. Bad thing is you had to pick them all up either way lol

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13 hours ago, Randy Sohn said:

Boy-oh-boy, wish now that I could ask someone but the thought suddenly occurred to me that they're all gone.  And yeah, I sure do remember also the Case balers, guess that you'd know what I'm talking about when I thought of mentioning those wood "blocks".

Chuckle, guess what I recall the most was trying to start one of those d----ed Wisconsin V-4s!

best, randy

Oh, yah.  One of my uncle's was the blocker.  Once in awhile he would miss the block and we would end up with a long bale when baling our own.  Custom baling, we just put it in the next  windrow and rebaled it.  The same uncle started that Wisconsin by pulling the drive belt and we left it run until quiting time.

Ron

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12 minutes ago, Ron Cook said:

we left it run until quiting time

Chuckle, chuckle, why am I thinking "and THAT was the most wide spread solution"!

best, randy

(you caused me to think back about those days - made me think hera about baling and hauling flax straw for the Peter J. Swietzer Co.)

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So who wants to bet the average person who would buy one of these mini balers for $12k also has a little bale spear on their loader and a cute mini wagon to stack the bales on.

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2 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Think the shedding water thing was more an advertising thing but also if it rained before you got them picked up you didnt lose much hay. Bad thing is you had to pick them all up either way lol

Most folks I knew baled directly onto a wagon, wasn't nearly as many bales to pick up or to get rained on that way.

Rick

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6 minutes ago, Cattech said:

So who wants to bet the average person who would buy one of these mini balers for $12k also has a little bale spear on their loader and a cute mini wagon to stack the bales on.

And what's wrong with it if they do?🤣

 

About the only people I know who would use something like that at all is a couple near me with 200 milking goats.

 

Rick

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7 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

Most folks I knew baled directly onto a wagon, wasn't nearly as many bales to pick up or to get rained on that way.

Rick

That is all we did.  No dropping bales on the ground.  Enough danged work as it was.  Most of our hay and straw harvesting was stacked loose with an overshot stacker and in later years with a DUAL loader with hay stacking attachment.

Ron

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2 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Most folks I knew baled directly onto a wagon, wasn't nearly as many bales to pick up or to get rained on that way.

Rick

My point was with a ROTO BALER you had to pick them up either way. Or am i missing something? Didnt think you could bale directly onto wagon with rotobaler. I agree most baled directly onto wagon with squares here too.

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2 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

My point was with a ROTO BALER you had to pick them up either way. Or am i missing something? Didnt think you could bale directly onto wagon with rotobaler. I agree most baled directly onto wagon with squares here too.

Don't know, I've been lucky, never had to handle bales out of a roto baler. I guess I kinda figured because you could bale onto a wagon with a square baler AC would have made the roto baler have the same ability. Seems that would have been desirable.

Rick

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1 hour ago, oldtanker said:

Don't know, I've been lucky, never had to handle bales out of a roto baler. I guess I kinda figured because you could bale onto a wagon with a square baler AC would have made the roto baler have the same ability. Seems that would have been desirable.

Rick

Agreed another strike against them if couldnt bale onto a rack. I always thought their shed water claim was an attempt to counter that negative point but im not sure either.

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I have had experience with AC roto bales.    What a PITA they were.  always dropped on the ground---hard to pick up--need racks on both ends of the wagon to keep them on----if you stacked them to high in the barn they would push the sides of the barn out---and then TRY TO FEED THEM--square bales break a part so you can spread them out----not round bales.  The best you could do was try to roll them out---if you succeeded there was a 3 inch core that you could use for a baseball bat left-----there is still one sitting in the hedgerow-----tried to give it to scrapper----he said it wasn't worth the time and expense to get ride of it

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On 11/3/2018 at 4:58 PM, Big Bud guy said:

I have a NH history magazine and and the first baler they sold was the self tying twine baler invented by Edwin Nolt. 

Here is a pic of a restored early NH baler

DSCN1471.JPG

DSCN1473.JPG

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3 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Don't know, I've been lucky, never had to handle bales out of a roto baler. I guess I kinda figured because you could bale onto a wagon with a square baler AC would have made the roto baler have the same ability. Seems that would have been desirable.

Rick

Pretty sure I saw a loader for the AC round bales that you pulled around the fld and it picked em up off the ground and dumped them on a wagon. It was at an AC show, seems like the loader was not AC but from a shortline co

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From C.H. Wendels The Allis Chalmers Story. 

20181104_204328.jpg

20181104_204338.jpg

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3 hours ago, Eric V Bielke said:

Here is a pic of a restored early NH baler

Yup, even that GD'md no good air cooled Wisconsin 30 horse V-4!    &^@%^(*&%$##&(^#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

best, randy

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9 hours ago, Randy Sohn said:

Yup, even that GD'md no good air cooled Wisconsin 30 horse V-4!    &^@%^(*&%$##&(^#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

best, randy

Didn't even know what one was till 72. Worked for an old guy that summer who had an old Case pull behind combine powered by one, hand crank. IIRC this guy was pushing 80. Guess who learned how to start one of those? Once started in the morning he wouldn't shut it off till he was done for the day. Good thing all he had was oats to run through it.!

 

Rick

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