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Tonyinca

Old School Hay Bucking At CAFES ,Tulare

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On the other thread of parade and trucks , I forgot to mention that we invited our local friendly Bear to join us. No one got ticketed but we got lot of free advice . lol.

   Hay bucking competition is very popular at CA Antique Eq. Show. 

    Many of these dairymen had their own hay hauling crews before the  coming of the Bale wagon and hay squeeze

    There are usually 5 or 6 teams all have same amount of three wire Alfalfa bales , they are started by a clock man and they have judges watching technic and tightness of the load.

     The boom trucks were very important back in the day . A set of doubles could haul around 400 three wire bales  . Boom trucker were called swampers and many had CB's and were on call from the trucker.

  They were paid by the load.  When I started farming this is how we moved hay to the dairy shed in Chino Ca . before all those dairymen sold for houses and moved to the Tulare area.

     Tony

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Tony, I have to ask, how heavy are the bales?  I've never seen anything like that to move them.  We used to have a new Holland bale wagon and made 65-70 pound bales so it worked better.  When you had to stack them higher or load a pickup for someone you got a workout.

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45 minutes ago, Pete1468 said:

Tony, I have to ask, how heavy are the bales?  I've never seen anything like that to move them.  We used to have a new Holland bale wagon and made 65-70 pound bales so it worked better.  When you had to stack them higher or load a pickup for someone you got a workout.

  110 to 130

         When I baled I had scale set for 120 on baler.

        Baler has hydraulic press adjustable from tractor and we had make sift scale on the drop shot .  Basically scale was a pointer marking the sweet spot on a flat piece of matal.

          Tony

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Makes sense, that's why they have 3 twine and a lifter.  I'm glad my dad didn't know about those when we did hay as he would have tried it.

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Makes my knees hurt just looking at the pictures. 😀

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   Through the sixties & seventies we had a family in area that had several trucks  Dad ,uncle, and four sons all had their trucks & boom trucks .

      They hauled hay year round.

          They all had biceps, arms & chests to die for and very little fat percentage on their bodies.

            The Dad is close to ninety now still has a boxers upper body .

          Tony  

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37 minutes ago, Tonyinca said:

   Through the sixties & seventies we had a family in area that had several trucks  Dad ,uncle, and four sons all had their trucks & boom trucks .

      They hauled hay year round.

          They all had biceps, arms & chests to die for and very little fat percentage on their bodies.

            The Dad is close to ninety now still has a boxers upper body .

          Tony  

In ‘50 a hurricane took my dads barn down. 

They spent that winter logging and built a new barn in ‘51- mixed 1500 -98 pound bags of cement in an electric mixer and poured it all with a wheelbarrow! You should have seen those biceps 💪😎

When my uncle was in his 60’s I helped him set some new fence posts with a friend of mine. We would pull the posts with a tractor and loader. My friend got impatient and started pulling by hand, he wasn’t a small guy, (maybe 30 years old)but after about the third post he found one he couldn’t move, my uncle grabbed a hold of it and pulled it out, and never said anything! These posts were at least 6” on top and 8’ long for a heifer barnyard.

My friend didn’t grab anymore fence posts!

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12 hours ago, 2+2 Guy said:

Makes my knees hurt just looking at the pictures. 😀

A good boom loader could place the bale right where it goes.  All the guy on the truck needs to do is set in place,  The elbow is generally the first to go on the old boomers,

 

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14 hours ago, Tonyinca said:

  110 to 130

         When I baled I had scale set for 120 on baler.

        Baler has hydraulic press adjustable from tractor and we had make sift scale on the drop shot .  Basically scale was a pointer marking the sweet spot on a flat piece of matal.

          Tony

I shot for 100 pounds on Freeman 2 tie,  The stackers charged the same if it was 100 or 75, so crank up the pressure,

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Good boom man puts the bale so a bump with the knee is all it took to place it. The boom does the lifting. I did not sit and time them in the old days, but thinking a hour and 1/2 and they where pulling out of the yard with about 425 bale loaded and tied down.

 

The guys that are good with a hay squeeze today are just as amazing.  Moved a 1000 bales about a 100 yards into my barn in 2 hours. My barn was built about 1880 and not made with modern equipment in mind.  So never moved faster than a walk as he had a spotter on the blind side to guide him in all the narrow places.  

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Very fascinating, we would throw on a wagon in the hay meadow and then a gas powered elevator would take them up to the hay mow. If we were loading a semi, the elevator would take them up to the trailer but you still had to drag and place them. You guys were way ahead of us in the smarts dept! Our meadow hay bales probably weighed about 60 pounds, if they got up towards 80, you really knew it. I was always the one on the trailer and a good and tight, straight, pretty load was a matter of pride as well as good advertising as it went to it's destination.

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The first time I saw those boom trucks at CAFES I thought they were some kind of well service truck. I have to say it was one of the most interesting events I watched while I was there.

Arlin

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Would be interesting to see for sure. Never saw or heard of anything like that around here. Far as i know everyone around us did as sandhiller described.

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Looks interesting. We did it all by hand when I was young. Everything went in a barn. Doesn't look like a boom would work well there. 

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43 minutes ago, redneckhippie said:

Looks interesting. We did it all by hand when I was young. Everything went in a barn. Doesn't look like a boom would work well there. 

Its just loaded from stack in field to truck with a boom.  Harrobed from field to stack/corner, boom to trucks, gas/or elc hay elevators into barns at dairy.  Them 3 tie aint for sissies for sure!

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7 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

Its just loaded from stack in field to truck with a boom.  Harrobed from field to stack/corner, boom to trucks, gas/or elc hay elevators into barns at dairy.  Them 3 tie aint for sissies for sure!

After watching some videos it makes more since. Maybe before sqeezes or grapples. We used a Johnny pop up on the side of a truck for years. Getting harder to get two tie around here. I have been having to buy 3 tie and looks like I will need to buy a squeeze soon to handle it. 

Thank you for sharing. Nice to see how it's done somewhere else. Being on this forum and others is a real eye opener. I assumed it was all done the same before. 

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