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harvesterguy

Tips for "balancing" a wedge lock wheel

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The 856 is getting a new pair of rear tires this week.  Now seems like a good time to try and rectify the whomp-whomp-whomp in road gear.  Based on my crude flat bar and vise grip measurements, one wheel is roughly 1" out of round and the other is slightly more.  It doesn't sound like much, but when they get in sync (more so out of sync), it can be a violent ride above 11mph with a 300 gal 3 pt sprayer.

I've had the wedge locks off before to narrow to 30" rows and the problem was noticably worse afterwards.  It is not noticable when the axle mount duals are on, but I don't want the duals for post emerge spraying.

Any suggestions on how to better center these wheels?

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Harvesterguy

         Do you have your owners manual?     There are specific instructions on how to set up the wheel lugs on the hub.  There are two alignment lugs that are installed to the hub first and these position the rim and are driving lugs for the wheels.   Then the rest of the lugs are installed and used to align the rim and tires.

GT&T

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Just some clarification.   The wheel is what is clamped or wedged to the tractor axle.   If that wobbles you need a new wheel.     If the rim wobbles you can correct that with the wedges from the wheel to the rim.   The best explanation is in the operator manual.  Maybe someone can post it.  

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I agree with them both, but since you said "wedge lock" I'm assuming you meant wedge lock.  If you moved those (the wheel) and it got worse, I'm thinking they and likely your wheel, are well worn, and the wedges are sucked in narrow and un evenly.   Stare at where the wedges wedge against the wheel.  Do they look even and symmetrical? I'd start there. Then move out to the wheel to rim clamps.  

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It seems like the issue is in the hub to axle placement.  It does wobble slightly side to side but most of the issue is non coincentric to the axle.

 

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Id say your wedges aernt even so it bends the rim and its not round anymore and then the tire isnt round! Thats why this is torque spec on wedge rim wedges! But how many of us farmers have a 3/4 torque wrench not many! Im lucky i borrow from work! And if your rim wedge bolts are like most thier rusted up and may act tighter than they are

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9 minutes ago, Gleaner k2 said:

Id say your wedges aernt even so it bends the rim and its not round anymore and then the tire isnt round! Thats why this is torque spec on wedge rim wedges! But how many of us farmers have a 3/4 torque wrench not many! Im lucky i borrow from work! And if your rim wedge bolts are like most thier rusted up and may act tighter than they are

I found out with the old bolts going up to spec I have broken them. Also bought new Chinese bolts that broke from online somewhere. I forget the torque but it’s way up there. 

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1 hour ago, harvesterguy said:

It seems like the issue is in the hub to axle placement.  It does wobble slightly side to side but most of the issue is non coincentric to the axle.

 

Agreed with gleaner. Back them off and start over. Lots of guys have ways they like to do this. Some guys stand a sledgehammer handle up just touching the tread on one side. Then roll the tire over and watch your gap. Adjust as necessary. Get them as close as you can then torque them down. Then go drive it some and check them again. It’s kind of a pain to do it right. That’s why so many hop up and down like a bronco in road gear. 

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Last time we did this we were getting new rubber,  Replaced rims as they had rusted at the stems..

Man it was 100 times easier without the rubber on the rim,  and the tire guy liked mounting that way better.

we c clamped a square on the tractor and then rotated the wheel, round and round.  We bought new bolts form CIH for this also

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I really  have no idea what I'm doing, but I've done it 6-8x, and they don't bounce going down the road.    I'm sure I have done some while reading a manual, others by listening to my smarter than me neighbor, and some just by eye.   If  something is running "off" by an Inch, I'd think it would be obvious what needs to be moved where.   New wedge locks are reasonable, but won't work if your wheel is worn. 

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Thanks everyone for the ideas!  I plan to start working on it tonight and will post back when I find the culprit.

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I would also put oil on the wedges where they slide so they dont hang up and act tight!

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once the wedge-loc hub is seated on the axle shaft that is the true center your rim is out of round or bent check your rim to wheel center clamps for correct seating on the rim bead and make sure the rim is true and clamps tight also tires can have an out of round condition do they have fluid also? 

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3 hours ago, Gleaner k2 said:

I would also put oil on the wedges where they slide so they dont hang up and act tight!

I have no experience with wedge-lock hubs so I'm probably talking out of turn here. If I were installing the wedge-lock centers I would follow the book as close as I could. I'm sure the engineers arrived at the torque spec either dry or with a lubricant. A lubricant on the wedges could possibly increase the clamping force drastically. When I was younger, I was putting a pulley on a shaft. It was the tapered cone type with a split hub. I was tightening the bolt as tight as I could so it would not give me trouble. Then I heard a ping. I cracked the pulley by over torquing it. Cone and wedge type fasteners can develop tremendous clamping force. Putting lubricant on the wedges when it's not called for  could cause the cast center to crack. I have no experience with this and putting oil on the wedges may be a better way to get them tight enough but I would use caution.

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