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My IH 500 dozer has done only 3500hrs and is having pins and bushes replaced. The Sprockets are pointy and well worn. Are there new ones/after-market ones available anywhere, or should I simply tell the track people doing the pins to rebuild them? They are quoting NZ$1500 plus tax to do the rebuild. Thanks

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You certainly got your moneys worth at 3500 hours , most aftermarket u/c's are in bad shape at 2-2500 hours

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Greg, Nice little 500 you have there.

Last I heard(a few years back) ,Berco had stopped making Chains for these. I assume the sprockets went the same way....unless an Asian maker picked up the slack.

Most track importers now have access to a big range of suppliers in Asia & Europe.

Try the Value Part Australia website...they have specs on each item.

That little machine has a big sprocket-I remember once trying to find a weld on rim of same diameter...I think the Massey 2244 came close,maybe Mitsubishi BD2F...but of course they have different pitches.(140 & 135mm)

I still have used parts for a 500 Loader here..except the undercarriage,of course!

 

Jim

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Thanks for that. Their website shows nothing IH so might be a dead-end, but I've emailed to see. Cheers

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Congrats on the pins and bushings...they are like hen's teeth!  I had mine redone a couple of years ago and to get a complete set, they came from all across the globe!  As for the sprockets, your best bet may be to have them rebuilt by welding the gullet between the teeth.

 

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Thanks for that. First owner bought a set of pins and bushes with the dozer new in '68 and they stayed with it in their original box. Machine has always been shed-stored so not a sign of rust anywhere and even the seat has original covering.

I'm gonna get the sprockets rebuilt. Getting new will be impossible I think. Cheers

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The factory tracks for 1460-----1480 combines were common rails, pins/bushings for one of the small IH crawlers.   Not sure-----but seems like it was the 500???

I do remember these combine tracks had a 6.25" pitch.  

Don't know how many sets are still around-------if the pitch is 6.25;  you might check with some of the large salvage yards.

I bought a set from my neighbor for scrap value-------never got around to my planned project and eventually hauled them off for scrap.

Here in the Mississippi Delta, usually the tracks were just used during wet/muddy harvest conditions-----and switched back to rubber.  So most combine tracks were in pretty good shape.

 

DD

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Think the 500's out here only ever had steel tracks and were mainly used for agriculture - ploughing etc- on steeper land. No 4WD tractors available back then. I don't know what "pitch" refers to?

G

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The pitch is the distance from the center of one pin to the center of the next pin.  The pitch on the 500 track is "6 inches".

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...you talking about getting your sprockets built back to standard....??.....can't cross over any  excavator  sprocket rings ...???.......bu ilding  up sprockets  is sort of yesterday's  way of doing things  !!

Did my time as a welder awhile back.....building up sprockets  large   (D8)  ...and small.....(Cat  10...)......back in the early  60's  sprocket rings/ segments etc  were not on the radar....thus you did it the hard, slow way..

Good luck on this Greg,  you really need to find an old welder...as in the operator  !!......we used templates to get everything just right...but a template for your little IH crawler will be like rocking horse excrement..me thinks....I guess its not like building a clock....but to build your sprocket up correctly.....does require a bit of knowledge...to get it ok.....make sure whoever does it...that they keep away from hard surface rods......a common   mistake among the   ""  don't build many sprockets up these days "..brigade......just use 7018...it is far easier to build up the sprocket  a time or two than replace bushes in your chain.....that have had the crap chewed out of them due to some dork insisting on using some hardcraft type rod.........

Mike

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Greg,

That Value Part website might list the IH stuff under "DRESSER". Also,see if your local Komatsu agent can supply.

Maybe a weld on rim from something like a Case 450,or Allis ,or excavator might be a fit. The pitch on these 500s is similar to the pitch on a bigger 6-8 ton crawler.

A switched on track guy should be able to help.Do a google search for "undercarriage New Zealand" & see what pops up.

There are a lot of guys selling cheap Chinese track gear for big money....when they quote you,ask them where it's made. Then,ask if you can get a quote for Italian undercarriage.

Chinese stuff is probably Ok for old machines that run few hours,but the price difference for good gear may not be big.

 

 

G'day Mike,

I hope all is well with you.

 

Jim

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Hey, thanks guys for all the info and points. Trackweld in Hamilton (NZ) has the bullie, and has just done the pins and bushes. They also found that the left idler had a disintegrated bearing and was wobbling (I had asked them to check it) and they have found that the casting had also worn so have had it machined true and a new bearing shell turned to fit the greater diameter. The right one had no movement at all. They have been around doing undercarriages since 1952 and still have patterns for the 500 sprockets. Those sprockets are a single casting and either need complete replacement or built up. You can't cut off/unbolt the teeth and replace them. The owner of Trackweld told me yesterday that the bulk of their undercarriage work on sprockets  thru the 50's and 60's was rebuilding sprockets using patterns and hard-face welding to match the hard faced bushes. They still have welders experienced at it. Anyway, it's way too good a bullie and such a delight to work with that  I think it is simply worth getting the job done right, irrespective of cost. Total cost (remove and reinstall tracks etc, replace pins/bushes, machining etc on idler, rebuilding sprockets) will be NZ$5,300. I've just had to courier over my oiler-gun- all the IH500 flat-top oilers on the rollers etc are intact and working and he thought he had one lying around but time (or light fingers) has evaporated it and he will need it to pump the hydraulic track tensioners after the tracks are back on.

Herself has not been told, just yet, but there will be words!!!!!! I might have to sleep with the bullie when she comes home!!!

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1 hour ago, greg lawson said:

 

Herself has not been told, just yet, but there will be words!!!!!! I might have to sleep with the bullie when she comes home!!!

as joey says take her for some fine dining before and after

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Yes several repeated trips to the fancy restaurants may be in order, along with a lot of "yes dear"!:) I am pretty sure if I rebuilt the under carriage on the old TD6 the bill would be similar too!

Regards,

Chris

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Thanks guys. She's coming home Tomorrow, or the next,and the bill will follow......and our bank accounts are all joint!! No hiding here.

Fine dining is a trick along with red roses, and chocolates that herself is deeply suspicious of. I'll think of something. Meantime, I've bought a lightweight set of rippers someone out here is getting made up in China and will take pressure of bullie working a long track I've gotta install alongside a shelter-belt so there's roots to deal with. A 10 or 12 tonner would be a better option but with patience and time my little machine will do just great. I'll post a photo of her in action again.

Cheers

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HI Rawliegh99 - is that procedure something you could email? would like to get the whole thing and print it out to study and add soem other planning. 

 

need to fix my 340 rear sprockets....

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I can certainly email what I have, but what you saw is what I've got.  Someone posted it a long time ago and I copied it.  i don't have the original.  Let me know.

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My uncle used to do this type repair on Cat equipment often before passing. He had a vertical milling machine and several jigs for different sprockets set up to machine the "gullets" after welding. Before the mill and new shop came along I used to align bore them by setting up one of my machines on a vertical plane. The trick was being rigid to eliminate chatter. I don't remember using anything but 7018, or 8018 rod and I welded a lot of them up with my old Hobart engine drive machine in the driveway. Sprockets were always sandblasted clean in the area. A couple of copper blocks and several stringers of weld were all that was needed before machining them back to normal dimension. I started with 5/32", then usually went to either 1/8", or 3/32" rod to finish up depending upon "tooth" profile needed at the top.

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I guess with the way sprockets teeth are now dismantable lots of the skills you had are gone.  I was lucky that there was an outfit here in New Zealand that still had patterns and the specialist welding knowledge. Thing is that back in 1968 NZ was so isolated and dependent on Great Britain (they took all our exports) for everything that almost all farm machinery was imported from there, and so IH had an assembly plant in Canada to service the demand from British colonies. The cost of US-sourced machinery was enormous. It also meant that we had to keep the stuff going for an inordinately long time. I guess when you got something as good as the 500, and it was in a class of its own out here as an agricultural  tool, you looked after it.

Apart from the steering clutches and now some of the undercarriage, everything in this machine is completely original. The hour meter still works and showed 2700 hours when I bought it from it's original owner. 

I guess what I am saying is that the quality and durability of my IH after half a century is a tribute to the engineers at IH.

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57 minutes ago, greg lawson said:

I guess with the way sprockets teeth are now dismantable lots of the skills you had are gone.  I was lucky that there was an outfit here in New Zealand that still had patterns and the specialist welding knowledge. Thing is that back in 1968 NZ was so isolated and dependent on Great Britain (they took all our exports) for everything that almost all farm machinery was imported from there, and so IH had an assembly plant in Canada to service the demand from British colonies. The cost of US-sourced machinery was enormous. It also meant that we had to keep the stuff going for an inordinately long time. I guess when you got something as good as the 500, and it was in a class of its own out here as an agricultural  tool, you looked after it.

Apart from the steering clutches and now some of the undercarriage, everything in this machine is completely original. The hour meter still works and showed 2700 hours when I bought it from it's original owner. 

I guess what I am saying is that the quality and durability of my IH after half a century is a tribute to the engineers at IH.

I agree with the way things "were" built. That old Hobart Bros. machine I spoke of was new in 1957 and still works as well today as when built. It's the one on the left:

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Lots of hours behind it and all original except for maintenance items. Still is 6VDC starting too. Can only guess how long a new and modern machine will hold up which is true of a lot of things.....

I'm not too familiar with crawlers myself as was mostly around heavy trucks. As mentioned predominantly Mack and end dumps, tippers, and other apparatus but not much on highway use so a rough life on equipment. Always liked repairing the "old" no matter the age.

I've thought from time to time of purchasing another older crawler but have enough projects to keep me going now. I'd purchased several years back a TD-12 without a blade or frame as it was a pipe layer, then found a blade and frame but sold the machine before working with it. Had one of those gasoline starting diesel engines which ran well.  

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