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vtfireman85

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I was at the general store today and they were making lunch for the film crew for TLC. I guess they are filming at the marble quarry in Danby where they quarry Danby Imperial Marble. I guess stay tuned for a special on marble. Probably will be lots of people I know in it. 

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Them poor people.....having to know you.......🤣🤣

 

Rick

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2 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

Them poor people.....having to know you.......🤣🤣

 

Rick

10-4

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29 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I was at the general store today and they were making lunch for the film crew for TLC. I guess they are filming at the marble quarry in Danby where they quarry Danby Imperial Marble. I guess stay tuned for a special on marble. Probably will be lots of people I know in it. 

Did someone say "quarry", "marble"???

YOU HAVE MY ATTENTION.

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I've been in that mine. Was just talking about it half an hour ago, actually. I'll only go underground if you can drive a 988H in the door. 

Did you know Mike Blair? I only met him once, but he was held in very high regard by my friend that took me up there. 

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5 minutes ago, Atilathehun99 said:

Did someone say "quarry", "marble"???

YOU HAVE MY ATTENTION.

Yes, imperial marble is all over the world. They claim to have 20 years worth of orders to fill. I think they are up to 5 quarries up there. Some are connected some are yet to be, goes on for miles. They are easily one of the biggest local employers and are very generous in th community. We go in with the fire department for training frequently and have a good working relationship. 

 

These pics are from a drill a year or 2 ago, not real interesting from a quarry perspective but all I had on my phone. That’s me in the red shirt. Probably have my mouth open, I had a head cold if I remember right. 

95A1E429-E873-4702-84FD-008AA5F373D6.jpeg

E22A5CC7-D2CC-488E-BE0C-E2864730DB7D.jpeg

E5814CDE-8353-4D33-8B14-C8CADB5125B0.jpeg

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3 minutes ago, Dave Shepard said:

I've been in that mine. Was just talking about it half an hour ago, actually. I'll only go underground if you can drive a 988H in the door. 

Did you know Mike Blair? I only met him once, but he was held in very high regard by my friend that took me up there. 

Yes, mike was a good dude. His oldest son was a few years behind me in school. Mike was heavily involved in the community. From donations to all sorts of non profits to coaching about 20 years worth of school sports teams. Who took you in there?

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Thanks for informing me of a quarried product I've not know of.  It's great to see that there are still American companies quarrying American stone that can compete w/ offshore suppliers.

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5 minutes ago, Atilathehun99 said:

Thanks for informing me of a quarried product I've not know of.  It's great to see that there are still American companies quarrying American stone that can compete w/ offshore suppliers.

Actually, I almost am sure it is an Italian parent company, used to be. 

Used to be primarily polish workers. The proctors haslots of quarry’s spread around and employed lots of ethnicities but kept them in different places to avoid fighting.

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It is Italian owned. They own several quarries in the US.

I went there with a friend from down here to pick up some slabs, when you could still do that. 

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These are some other shots I had on my phone I just found from a few years ago, I’m particularly impressed with the slicer. Works exactly like a bread loaf slicer. They space them for whatever thickness they need and slice down through a block. Marble is shipped in from all over the country as well as quarried here to be processed here in the “shop” .  

second picture is a recent cutting, notice how much cleaner and smoother it looks than some of the other pictures on the floors and walls, they drill in and thread this diamond cable stuff through and it wraps around a saw head thats on tracks and the saw head travels backwards and pulls the cable through, it can be feild shortened and spliced

third pic and forth pic are a vein of something, i think they said dolomite, but i could be wrong, must be crumbly because anywhere its overhead they have put that mesh over. 

25787491-4544-4F6B-A1A5-F631400C64DE.jpeg

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D230F441-1950-42A8-AD85-9BFB32148111.jpeg

35103549-BDD2-4448-8D31-291AF462A673.jpeg

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this is the oven that they bake on the mesh backing for counter tops and tiles, and below this pic is the mesh stuff they use. 

third one is of the pillars that are left to support the ceiling, as you go down in the quarry you go under the level where this was taken and it looks about the same just layer upon layer of this that spirals down. kind of like a parking garage.

the last one i believe to be a vent hole but its been a long time. they look like that, chain link fence around them to keep people from falling in. 

 

 

C60DF5E9-04AC-45F1-BF0F-CAAB631A5E92.jpeg

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066CC396-E1B2-4148-BD0A-87F823B91E90.jpeg

2ECF10AD-82AA-4FBD-A020-132EBFC41FE0.jpeg

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15 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Them poor people.....having to know you.......🤣🤣

 

Rick

we all have our crosses to bear rick.

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When I'm in Colorado I often visit the town of Marble, Quarry there has the whitest stone. Used to b a huge mill that made parts for the Capital and various other monuments. Now the quarry is still operational but I think the stone is shipped overseas for milling.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble,_Colorado

Great BBQ restaurant there as well. We kill a whole day.

 

 

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2 hours ago, New Englander said:

When I'm in Colorado I often visit the town of Marble, Quarry there has the whitest stone. Used to b a huge mill that made parts for the Capital and various other monuments. Now the quarry is still operational but I think the stone is shipped overseas for milling.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble,_Colorado

Great BBQ restaurant there as well. We kill a whole day.

 

 

Could be something else but Danby takes whole train loads for processing from CO, they built a siding in the old lumber yard and my friends construction company will spend a day or 2 unloading trains and hauling one block at a time up to the quarry.  They do t every couple months

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How big are the blocks they are sending by train? Most of what we work with is 6-12 tons, but we could go to about 25 if we found a good block. We took the dipper off a 50 ton P&H. Its a brute. The gray thing up against the end of the building is a wire saw that we built to break down the blocks. There are automated saws polishing equipment inside. 

 

 

IMG_20161119_113420337.jpg

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Dave 

They can go at 110k gross legally to the rail cars, I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if larger went on . I’ll ask tomorrow.

what all are you working with? Is it just marble or are you cutting other stone? That on the trailer looks blasted. 

Have you ever seen the cavendish green marble? They cut and cut there kept having faults in it and all had to be reinforced on the back but it was gorgeous. I haven't seen any go by lately nor have I heard about it either but it sure was something.

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My friend works with 95% marble. Granite requires a different diamond blade makeup. Marble is allergic to blasting, it will be full of cracks. That particular block was cut with a steam channeller in the '20's, and was left on a rail siding in '29, the stock market crash having put them out of business. 

This channeller has an electric motor. Once you had a flat bench in the quarry, you would channel down about five feet in a grid to create the blocks. The first few blocks would be snapped loose with wedges, bars or whatever way possible. Once you had access to the bottom of the blocks, you drill horizontally under them and drive wedges under to break them loose. When you see an old block with 2-3" holes drilled closely all across the face, that's probably what was happening. Smaller holes spaced 6"-12" apart is from feathers and and wedges.

IMG_20160420_161829302.jpg

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This article published in a local weekly a few years ago says the blocks are going to Italy but maybe they're now going to VT as well as there's processing capability there as well:

 https://www.aspensojo.com/articles/2016/5/1/oh-calacatta

The old train down the mountain is long gone. You can see where there were derailments along the steep route and smashed marble blocks are in the stream the rail followed. Frankly it's so steep one would think it would have needed to be a cog rail. Local artists/sculptors in the area carve what's probably considered waste. Some beautiful work. I found a book with pictures of the mill in its heyday. There are still pieces of columns lying around that must have been rejects.

There are blocks stacked and loaded at the main office, all going by truck now but I don't know where. There's rail in Glenwood Springs as the coal trains come rumbling through along with an Amtrak station that brings in Amish tourists. Blocks are in the 10-20 ton range. The trucks may be going over McClure pass to another line as I've never seen them coming through Glenwood.

Here's a video of the yard I found:

 

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