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jflaw92

Radiator shutters

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I have a dumb question, what are radiator shutters for? I've found sets on Craigslist for an M before and have thought about buying them for ours just to say I have them. 

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Just now, jflaw92 said:

I have a dumb question, what are radiator shutters for? I've found sets on Craigslist for an M before and have thought about buying them for ours just to say I have them. 

Someone smarter than me will answer, but I think they were more for kerosene tractors keeping operating temperature higher thus burning fuel more effectively 

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6 minutes ago, jflaw92 said:

radiator shutters for?

Mmmmmmmm, I don't seem to remember one on the M's and later stuff like that but I sure do remember the crank up near the spark control on our F-20.  Closed off/restricted  the airflow to the radiator.

best, randy

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up here we used them to control engine temperature in cold weather or it would never warm up mostly on the diesels, my sw6-ta diesel has them on it so does my daughters c but it is a thermo- syphon sytem so they are used to regulate temp on that engine also.

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I have the control bracket from the C I am working on. The rest is gone already.

   As noted they were used to control the temperature because if the engine got too cold it would not burn the kerosene well and then you'd have trouble . So you get the thing hot running on gas, then you switch the kerosene run it all day . And then run your kerosene out of your carburetor with your fuel valve shut before you shut the thing off. 

Actually was distalate fuel , similar to kerosene but not exactly the same

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48 minutes ago, bitty said:

Actually was distalate fuel , similar to kerosene but not exactly the same

Ah-so, remembering that distilate name/fuel well, recall asking my dad about what it was and he told me the same as what you'd said.  Again, re the earlier, I'd said "memory".  Again, don't remember it on our M (1951 M) but sure do on the F-20.  Wondering, could it have been on an MD? 

best, randy

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Never had any actual exprience, but---

The distalate fuel required the engine to operate at a higher temperature to maximize power from the fuel.

Most of the early M's here in the Delta apparently were distalate engines.  Small tank for starting gas; distalate manifold; and radiator shutters.  Most of these M's were switched to straight gasoline------and eventually converted to L-P.

Still see M's with the small gas starting tank and some of the radiator shutter linkage still mounted.  But-----I don't remember ever actually seeing shutters/louvers mounted on a radiator.

I have inserted cardboard in front of both truck and tractor radiators before to get engine temp up in cold weather.  Would think you boys up north needed the radiator shutters much more than we did here in the south??

I do remember a couple of threads discussing this same subject-----including the difference between distalate and kerosene.  Don't know where to find those threads.

 

DD

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I have them on my H gas, never use them though, they seem to be seized up.

 

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My 48 H has shutters, X1 gasoline. I've closed them when running it on my log splitter when its cold out and it really doesn't make it run much warmer. The gauge goes from the L in cold to the D.

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37 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

I do remember a couple of threads discussing this same subject-----including the difference between distalate and kerosene.  Don't know where to find those threads.

Thinking w-a-y back, wonder if'n that was what dad called "tractor fuel"?  Lower compression engines.

best, randy

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20 minutes ago, TomH said:

My 48 H has shutters, X1 gasoline. I've closed them when running it on my log splitter when its cold out and it really doesn't make it run much warmer. The gauge goes from the L in cold to the D.

Found this, Googled it.

What's Tractor Fuel???

    Tractor fuel (or distillate) was similar to kerosene, but derived from petroleum (kerosene is often derived from coal). Think of paint thinner - it says on the label "Contains petroleum distillates". The engine needed to be really hot in order to vaporize that stuff. You couldn't start up the tractor with it. That is why there is a small gasoline tank on an "All Fuel" tractor. Once you got the engine started and warmed up, you switched a valve to the distillate tank. It wouldn't develop as much power as gasoline; but at the time, during the thirties and early forties, it was much, much cheaper than gasoline. THAT was the advantage! When gasoline became as cheap as tractor fuel, the all-fuel engines were discontinued. When that happened, the engine compression was increased in order to get more horsepower (the full potential of the gasoline). 
    Now, we ALL run them on gasoline! The engine needs to be really HOT to work well with the "heavier" fuels. It needs to be "WORKING" to get that hot. When we use the tractors for putt-putting around, it is difficult to keep the engine temperature up high enough. Don't worry, your two cylinder tractor, no matter how OLD it is, does NOT require special fuel. As is, the engine will run beautifully on gasoline. You just won't get any horsepower advantage over the tractor fuel, because of the low compression engine. Just buy "regular" gas. You don't need any "octane" because the engine compression is low. Your tractor

will never "ping".
 

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Thanks for the information everyone. I have an old Allis Chalmers WC that had had the small tank on it but was too rotted out to save. I didn't know that's how the distillate tractors worked.

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30 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

Good report Randy.

"Tractor Fuel" was the common terminology used down here.

 

DD

Yup, I read that - but I first heard it from my dad on the farm (Northwest Iowa (Lake Park).  Strange, tho I'd read that I honestly never heard it from any of my chums or locals when I was in the USAF (enlisted guy 1953/54, then Aviation Cadets/Lt. 1954/60).  San Antonio- Biloxi- Alexandria- San Antonio- Moultrie- Lubbock- Omaha.  Then the MN ANG until 1967.

best, randy

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4 hours ago, Randy Sohn said:

Thinking w-a-y back, wonder if'n that was what dad called "tractor fuel"?  Lower compression engines.

best, randy

That is what my grandpa called it and also iirc 'tractorene'? when referring to his '41 JD A. Don't know if it applies here but I have a 1950 IHC 220 t/a truck with the 549 gas motor that has shutters.

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1 hour ago, sandhiller said:

that has shutters.

Yes, thinking back (I hope that someone else on here who remembers can "chip in") I kinda recall that also, it was before the advent/adoption/usage of anti-freeze liquids in the wintertime!  They'd close the shutters down and put water into the radiator -after it got warm and wouldn't freeze.  Then, when done with the car/truck you'd drain the radiator when shutting the engine off.  Lotta work - but that's how life was.  IIRC that was a time before the 40s/50s that you say your truck is, but the ideas/stuff prolly still was around.  I was born in 1934 so remember people telling about it.

best, randy

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shutters where not just for distillate tractors they where also used to control temp. in colder weather,

Shutters where even still available on the Farmall 560 

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County Hwy. Dept. had 40 or so 1700 Loadstars with 354 Perkins Diesel that were equipped with thermostatically controlled shutters to keep that Perky at high power output!

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Curiosity got me to looking... Found this in the Archives...

 

 

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