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1972 international 1110


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Hello my name is Jim and I recently bought a 1972 international 1110 2wd with a 345 and the 3 speed automatic. I’ve tried looking and couldn’t find any production numbers for the internationals. Mine is a shortbed and a lot that I have came across are all long beds? Just figured I’d make a post with a couple pictures of my truck to just say hello 

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Welcome to the forum nice truck. I can't help with production numbers but there are a couple guys on here that worked for IH when they built these. I have not seen many shortbeds in the square bodies.

Dennis

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Thanks. It has paint chips and scrapes on it. I bought it from a guy who had it shipped from California in a box trailer and they had tables laying over on it. But other than that it’s really solid. All the old timers I’ve talked to here in Pennsylvania said these trucks didn’t last 7-8 years around here from rust. 

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They are correct, even frames rusted. Same here in SW Ohio, you can usually throw a cat through one and never hit a piece of metal with the doors closed.

Dennis

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  • 1 year later...

Production was about 40,000 pickups per year.  Short beds were not rare, but most were long beds.  Perhaps 20-30% short beds.  Remember, back in those days, pickups were mostly used for work purposes, not as a replacement for a car, and long beds were more suited for that.

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Nope, 1000/1010s had torsion bar independent front suspension.

1100/1110 had I-beam front axle.  

Little difference in GVW and no other differences.

Heavier GVW in half tons came in 1975 to work around requirements for a cat converter in lighter trucks.  The 1974 IH 100 became the 150 for 75, same as Ford.

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You could get an 1100 in 2 or 4 wheel drive.  The 1100 was simply a solid axle, whether it was powered or not.  An 1100 4x4 normally carried "All Wheel Drive" name plates on the front fenders, much like the 4x4 Scouts.

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I worked for a farmer cattle backgrounder in West Tennessee in the 80's who had a small fleet of those short bed IH's for between farm beaters. Short bed 2wd was a very popular combination of any maker in that part of the South. Tractors were all Deere. Except for one1256 "The only thing Dad can't kill".

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