Sign in to follow this  
nelson jr

Dry fertilizer over the top in corn or sorghum?

Recommended Posts

Quote

 

Anyone spinning on dry fertilizer? What mix?

I had planned on running on some extra N using urea, but got thinking triple 19 might be better.  Anyone done this successfully?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was always under the impression that urea over standing corn would get into the whorl and burn the plant. Ammonium Nitrate is a little less potent but harder to find.  

Pre-plant urea should be fine. I have seen that done a lot with pretty fair results. This was normally a partial rate followed by a second shot of N in the form of anhydrous or liquid 28/32%. Weather and soil composition can play a large role in affectivness.  I am in an area where all N is applied in the spring.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never spread dry fertilizer over standing corn or milo-----but would be concerned about possible burn as stated by Sledgehammer.

Corn, Milo, wheat, rice, etc are all similar plants-------in that they need their nutrients early in the game before the joint starts moving.  Once the joint starts moving/developing-------been my experience that the ear/head size is pretty much determined.

Been long time since my farming days back in the mid 80s--------but seems I remember that phosphate and potash are not immediately available to the plant???  Best to get them out early???

But--------my knowledge comes from here in the South.  Weather and growing conditions may vary up north.

 

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How late did you plant? Mine is about done.

Urea over the top will leave some burn marks but no real damage. I spread some AMS and urea over the top last year to try for a bump from the sulphur in tha AMS.(drought killed that little experiment...didnt rain for 6 weeks after application😕) Urea was more or less for volume for spreading. There were a few brown freckles but grew thru it fine. P&K need to be down early to get the most benefit and even then it is not totally available the first year (50-60% is what i have been told).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dry fertilizer is all that is used in my area. Mixed fertilizer is applied early then a heavy application of urea or ammonia  nitrate is applied late. The dry fertilizer should be irrigated in. It will burn the corn but they still make over 200 bpa on good irrigated ground. Thx-Ace

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, new guy said:

How late did you plant? Mine is about done.

Urea over the top will leave some burn marks but no real damage. I spread some AMS and urea over the top last year to try for a bump from the sulphur in tha AMS.(drought killed that little experiment...didnt rain for 6 weeks after application😕) Urea was more or less for volume for spreading. There were a few brown freckles but grew thru it fine. P&K need to be down early to get the most benefit and even then it is not totally available the first year (50-60% is what i have been told).

There was a neighbor that spread urea this year on standing corn instead of rolling on 28% Yeah it leaves some burn marks on the leaves but it seems to outgrow it. (We still do Annhydrous).

Can't look any worse than the corn the neighbor ran y drops on his sprayer. One row must have been off because one row spaced perfectly across the field got the **** burned out of it perfect lines across the entire farm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, nelson jr said:

Anyone spinning on dry fertilizer? What mix?

I had planned on running on some extra N using urea, but got thinking triple 19 might be better.  Anyone done this successfully?

I am in an area where all N is put on in spring, but about four years ago the rented anhydrous bar messed up and only put on half the rate.  Planted, then rain with more rain. By the time I returned the rented bar and tanks, the corn was about 8" to 12" tall.  I had the tank I used in that field weighed and found out how it had not put on enough N. I had asked before about sidedressing  with Urea over the top and was told it would get in the whorl and make it grow weird, but that year the FS had got a new hiboy spreader cart and they said I could put on the extra N with the new cart and the corn would be fine.  Had  them add Agrotain to the Urea and got it spread just a day before a rain. That corn suffered no damage, except a few burn spots on the leaves, but did not affect the mature plant. The corn variety was not suppose to be super tall, but most was as tall or taller than the cab of the combine at harvest and most had two full ears and some had three full ears. Best yield that particular field had produced up to that point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m from eastern pa and thin topsoil and rocky conditions mean we simply cannot apply full units in front of a 200 bpa crop. Essentially everyone here topdresses some liquid. Most with dry.  I also work for a large fertilizer company and we custom apply thousands of acres on to standing corn, as high as we can get through with a self propelled John Deere spreader. A lot of smaller folks use pull type buggies and go right down the rows when corn is smaller. We prefer 39-0-0-6. 3/4 urea and 1/4 ammonium sulfate. If not going to rain that night.  Put on a nitrogen stabilizer like agrotain or nutrisphere. Be sure the corn is dry when you spread.  Getting in the whorls is not an issue, but if the corn is damp the dust from the spinners will stick and burn it pretty good. Aside from that I’m confident it will work out for you.  Extremely common practice here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ThirdGenRed said:

I am in an area where all N is put on in spring, but about four years ago the rented anhydrous bar messed up and only put on half the rate.  Planted, then rain with more rain. By the time I returned the rented bar and tanks, the corn was about 8" to 12" tall.  I had the tank I used in that field weighed and found out how it had not put on enough N. I had asked before about sidedressing  with Urea over the top and was told it would get in the whorl and make it grow weird, but that year the FS had got a new hiboy spreader cart and they said I could put on the extra N with the new cart and the corn would be fine.  Had  them add Agrotain to the Urea and got it spread just a day before a rain. That corn suffered no damage, except a few burn spots on the leaves, but did not affect the mature plant. The corn variety was not suppose to be super tall, but most was as tall or taller than the cab of the combine at harvest and most had two full ears and some had three full ears. Best yield that particular field had produced up to that point.

Can I ask a real stupid question?  Why did you switch to urea from Annhydrous for the rescue application? The toolbar not setup to sidress Annhydrous into standing corn? We split our nitrogen applications. Part at planting, part sidressed as Annhydrous in June. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have done it for years here ( on corn). First with straight urea, then several years ago we switched to a urea/ AMS mix (50-50).

It will burn the corn a little, but not any worse than my neighbor who drop tubes Nitan. Some of his gets dinged pretty bad.

It all grows out of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Reichow7120 said:

Can I ask a real stupid question?  Why did you switch to urea from Annhydrous for the rescue application? The toolbar not setup to sidress Annhydrous into standing corn? We split our nitrogen applications. Part at planting, part sidressed as Annhydrous in June. 

That's not a stupid question Reichow7120, every part of the country does stuff a little different. Here in this part of SWIA, most fields (at least what we farm) are very steep and irregularly shaped meaning lots of point rows. The CEC of most of this ground is 20 to 25 so all N can be applied in the fall or spring ahead of planting. Most farms in this area rent the pull behind anhydrous bars from the farm supply selling the anhydrous and being anhydrous is typically the cheapest form of N here, that is what almost everyone uses.  Don't know of any mounted anhydrous bars, only pull behind, so no one sidedresses with anhydrous here,  with the very steep hills and point rows, you would mash down way too much crop, if extra is needed because of a situation like we had, you can rent the hi-boy cart or talk FS into mounting their spreader box on one of their rowgators, but it normally is never needed.  Being really no one sidedresses or topdresses here, I think the farm supply wanted to rent out the hi-boy cart because no one was using it and it was brand new, so maybe they had to justify it at their location?  In fact, I think it only gets used in the early spring or late fall when the tandem axle carts go out.

As far as steepness of the hills here, most everyone use pull behind planters (us included), and you have to really drastically lead the planter uphill when planting across the hillside, and when combining you have to ride the uphill brake as you go across the hillside in order to stay in the rows.  A younger neighbor girl was running a combine here and had her boyfriend (I was told his family farms only flat ground near the river bottom) riding with her as she was going across a hillside in one field that really wasn't all that steep, and his eyes were as big as saucer plates and was quite pale after going a round with her.  Unless you have a sidehill combine, you don't fill the grain tank very full on those parts of the hillside because it gets way too top heavy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ThirdGenRed said:

I am in an area where all N is put on in spring, but about four years ago the rented anhydrous bar messed up and only put on half the rate.  Planted, then rain with more rain. By the time I returned the rented bar and tanks, the corn was about 8" to 12" tall.  I had the tank I used in that field weighed and found out how it had not put on enough N. I had asked before about sidedressing  with Urea over the top and was told it would get in the whorl and make it grow weird, but that year the FS had got a new hiboy spreader cart and they said I could put on the extra N with the new cart and the corn would be fine.  Had  them add Agrotain to the Urea and got it spread just a day before a rain. That corn suffered no damage, except a few burn spots on the leaves, but did not affect the mature plant. The corn variety was not suppose to be super tall, but most was as tall or taller than the cab of the combine at harvest and most had two full ears and some had three full ears. Best yield that particular field had produced up to that point.

2 and 3 ears sounds like population was too low??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, new guy said:

2 and 3 ears sounds like population was too low??

It would seem so, but was planted at 34,000 and seed dealer recommended 32,000-36,000. Field was a mess when we bought it needing fertility and ph addressed. I am guessing nutrient tie up because of overall high ph and the added N was enough to break some of nutrient tie up and make it available to plants. An old large farmer I know buys his dry fertilizer by the semi loads and tries to use it all up every year.  Had more than he needed one year so the field right next to the road and his house he spread very heavy on already very fertile ground. Planted at 34,000 and his had 2 and 3 full ears also, got his neighbors talking about how good his crop looked. If you look at yield winners like Randy Dowdy and how he fertilizes his fields, as long as you don't overdose with one nutrient tying up another nutrient, you can drastically increase your yield (of course that would be a large investment per acre). Randy Dowdy's farm average yield was 369 bu/ac and on not very good soil and he set a record of 503.79 bu/ac in 2014.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here in central wis I can see   anhydrous not being available in the future tank is in town the village is concerned and I was told liability is getting high, they are slowly doing more dry urea and there is liquid also, probably only one anhydrous supplier left around here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this