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Hi All,

I have been following this forum for quite some time now (it has been extremely helpful!) as I work on my 1950ish td6 crawler. I have finally become a member so I figured I would share my experience in case it will be of help to anyone else.

This crawler was purchased by my great grandpa (I am only 22) for use on his tree farm. He had plans for some sort of hydraulic lift in the front of the crawler that would grab small trees and lift them vertically to be placed in new locations, however it was never completed. The crawler had been sitting for maybe 10 years before it was moved just a few feet to park it in a new location by my dad. Since then it had been sitting 10+ more years (tarped) before I took interest in it. 

My first task was to get the crawler started on gas. It had the fuel tank relined and carb cleaned but would not start. Long story short, the magneto timing was 180 degrees off meaning it was trying to fire in the intake stroke. With that fixed, it fired right up on gas. I bled the diesel system and it switched over no problem. One of the reasons it had been sitting without use was that the main engine clutch was frozen solid and always engaged.

I was able to find a replacement clutch disc online and pull/replace/clean the clutch and flywheel etc. Then the clutch required some adjusting in order to get the lever to lock in position with less resistance. 

Started the thing up and was able to shift into all 5 gears and it ran great (forward and backward only :( ) I read all the posts on people trying to get steering clutches loosened up but with no success. I figured it would be best to pull those beasts out and clean them up. Those are not light haha

I have currently pulled the right steering clutch out (didn’t need any compression tools but tight fit) and disassembled it. To my surprise the clutch discs were not a solid piece of metal but actually came apart quite easily. I have cleaned up the drum and all the components except the discs, which take forever (a little work each day after work at CNH haha). One of the tricks to getting the clutch disassembled was to unlock the nut from the shaft by hitting those tabs back. I did manage to rip the gasket in the clutch compartment that seals the compartment from the transmission when I removed the clutch.

Is there somewhere I can get a replacement gasket. I haven’t found anything and will probably have to make my own.

Is there an easy way to clean the rust and debris off the discs? 

After I get those cleaned up it’s on to the left steering clutch. Then new wiring and some day hopefully some fresh paint.

Also just got the tracks loosened up as they were very tight. I purchased a button head lubricator (7/8) adapter for my grease gun but am having second thoughts about packing the rollers with grease after reading up on it. Anyone have suggestions? The seals show no signs of leaking and I don’t want to damage them.

Well this is where I am right now. I know you guys love pictures so I will try and post a bunch. 

Thanks!

 

 

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pbach,

Wow! First welcome! You have done real good on this machine, At 22 your doing good and when you have this TD6 running and turning it will be working for you until your 80!:)

 Love the pictures, you have really dove into it. way beyond what I would have done. Has working for CNH inspired you to begin the restoration on this family tractor? I now have to go back a look at the pictures in a little more detail. Your post and pictures remind me a lot of my own posts. I take pictures of the good the bad and the ugly. As you mentioned that may help some other forum member get motivated and or provide answers.Your work on the clutches will pay you great dividends.

Regards,

Chris

 

PS:

 I went back and looked at the pictures. (Thanks) You have a excellent grill, and front IH emblem (they are hard to find, yours can be restored). Your under carriage looks like new! At least compared to my very worn TD6.

Your not afraid to get in there and take things apart. And put them back together too! Amazed that the lights worked! Entire machine looks to be in pretty good condition too! 

 

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pbach

Welcome aboard! Love your pictures! I will be watching as you go, Great start!

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pbach

Very nice, tractor looks to be in very good condition, pto attachment is a nice thing to have. Your doing it right.

 

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I'll echo the replys! Love seeing the older tools you're using too!!

If an International crawler falls into my lap like I wish it would, I'll need to do what you are doing. I've gone 50 some years thinking I don't need a crawler.

This site messed that up for me. :) I want one bad.

If you've caught it here, do be very careful about the float lever in that carb. I broke mine 20 some years ago and made one here out of a piece of aluminum.

A saw and a file and it works good. :)

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Appreciate the replies! Chris, yes after talking to someone at CNH (totally by chance) who used to work on the gears and transmission of the old crawlers in Chicago, it inspired me to give our crawler any other look. He also introduced me to Kroil which is my new favorite tool.

Yeah there’s plenty of old wooden tools around, my grandpa might as well of had a hardware store in his basement.

I had the carb apart a couple times and was careful with the float as it seems very fragile.

Cleaned up some more clutch plates today but progress is slow. I think I can reuse all the metal and fiber plates as they don’t look too bad.  

Also had an amazing find in my grandpas old garage, an old lubrication bucket for the track rollers that looked brand new!

Any idea what kind of gasket material and thickness I should use for those gaskets around the clutch shaft where it connects to the transmission housing?

-Pete

Few more pics

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Pete,

I have that bucket  pump too. but mine is not in as good of shape, and I haven't got it working yet. Electrolysis might work good to clean up those steel clutch plates. A 5 gallon bucket would work good as the tank. Its slow but its working while your sleeping and or at work too. I did see your wooden handled tools! Awesome that your using family tools too. It can mean a lot as you trudge your way through a project like this. 

I cant help you on the gasket material. Sorry.

Search on KoO (King of Obsolete) he has some awesome pictures of his work with these "cats" as he likes to call them in the great white north.

Keep the pictures coming. Its kind of a self therapy to take and post the pictures too. At least for me!:) 

So I have to ask? Did it steer at all? Were the clutch pack rusted tight together? The reason I ask is that mine did not steer good at all until I adjusted the brakes, close to spec. I did not pull the clutch packs in mine. Which I hope I never have too. My loader frame would be very difficult to work around/ over!

 Regards,

 Chris

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I’ll have to do some reading up on electrolysis but that might do the trick or at least help out a lot.

I tried every possible combo of pulling back the clutch levers with/without brakes, left side and right side, both, etc.but not even the slightest turn. The thing tracked great tho and stayed right in a line. I will have to see if that stays the case after loosening the tracks quite a bit. I even put the rear end of the track up against a tree to try and break the clutch free but the crawler would have climbed right up it if I let it.

The clutch pack had maybe 3 or 4 plates stuck together, kinda in groups, when I took them out but they came apart easily enough. Would that be enough to stop the machine from turning? The machine was turned last time it was parked and I don’t think anyone messed with brake/clutch adjustments. I still wonder if the clutch might need adjusting tho to compress the spring more, I’ll have to read up on that too. I agree that I do enjoy the pictures of these crawlers and they tell more then words ever could. I hope you never have to pull those clutches haha

Pete

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Pete,

Thanks for the answers on the clutch packs. The experts will be along in a while to help analyse the clutch status. Sounds like you did not have a choice but to open it up and work on those. I am not very knowledgeable on those, never having a steering clutch apart. Your doing good work. I would wonder about the fiber discs? Are they in good enough shape to reuse?? And also can you get the steel plates smooth enough to function?? I dont know the answer to either one of these? Just thinking about clutches in general, and you dont want to have to rip this apart again.

Folks on here reminded me that if it steers, you need to move the machine every 6 months or so just to keep them from locking up. 

Regards,

 Chris

 

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My preferred tool for rusty discs is a air powered board sander with 80 grit paper , Nice job on the machine !! 

I am quite jealous of your oil bucket 😀

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I agree with Kevin next to the dirt pusher the can is a nice piece!

I think the youth part of this equation is kicking in big time. OK and I have to take a stab at this dont get offended. But I bet your not married and do not have any kids!:) If you have both then you have a great start to life too! You have made a lot of moves to get this going! Enjoying the pictures, they do tell a lot about this type of antique project! Do you pan to restore it too???

Regards,

 Chris

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very nice looking TD!  Excited to follow the progress!  Is that pointer in the 8th picture for the timing?  I am yanking the magneto off my TD6 to rebuild it, and want to make sure its in TDC on No.1.  I don't know if mine has a pointer or not.

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Chris, No kids/wife yet so might as well get this done while I have some time on my hands haha 

hank, yes that is the timing for the magneto. It’s located on the crankshaft pully at the front of the machine. If you look closely, there is a DC and M marked on the pully, I had to use a wire brush and clean mine off in order to see the markings. There are other posts that go into further detail but I will give you the short rundown from what I understand. DC is short for top dead center and M is for magneto. There should be an audible clicking from the magneto when the TDC is reached. Crank slowly with the hand crank to find it. Ideally it should be right in between the M and DC (someone correct me if I am wrong) since you want the firing right after the tdc is reached to prevent backfires. When that clicking sound is heard, the rotor should be either pointing at the #1 or #3 spark plug. This is the problem I ran into and had to pull the rotor and gear and rotate 180 degrees. As long as you take it off and put it on the same way you shouldn’t run into any problems.

6/11 metal plates cleaned so far

Chris, I would love to restore this machine, but don’t have any experience doing that so just taking one step at a time. I’ve seen your posts on your partially restored td and it looks great!

What kind of paint/hardner/primer did you use. Did you sand blast or just use electrolysis? Maybe I’ll start with the grill like you did as it’s easy to get to. If you have any tips let me know.

Do the metal plates look good enough to reuse? They feel pretty smooth 

Pete

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Your pump is priceless!!!!! I have one of the same model, but well used. Still going strong! Cannot advise on the discs, have not had to go into mine yet--knock on wood.

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Thanks for the info!  Keep us posted on the progress!  its nice to see some more young guys still interested in these old machines.  Im 33 with 2 kids and a honey-do list, so its hard to make time.  Get it done while you can!

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What kind of oil do you guys use in your bucket lubricators? And how do you know when to stop greasing?

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Looking good! You’re disks should be fine. Once you have the machine running, just don’t let it sit for long periods. 

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Pete,

 I used the Electrolysis tank for the grill cleaning. If I have it up and running ists the go to method for cleaning rusty stuff. The other work was just grunt work with a wire brush and I use Rustoleum primer and top (coat rattle cans). Nothing special on this end. Mine is not a restoration. Just a clean, fix and paint if its broke project.

Your doing great! Yes do these types of thing while your young. Great experience and the energy factor is up there too!

Your metal plates looks good to me. 

Another thing this old guy can tell you. "Do the hard part first" If you get that done the rest will fall in order! By the looks of your work you could do a restoration. These types of equipment are great for practice. You cant hurt them and not many folks are going to judge them.

Enjoying your thread, and Hanks too! Every time you fire this old girl up your great grandpa will be right there with you too!:) Its kind of like a wayback machine. (you may have to google that one)

Regards,

 Chris

 

 

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I have to say I liked seeing the AERO KROIL in the pics!  I had an older gentleman turn me on that stuff and Im a true believer!  Its a bit pricey, but worth it in my book!

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I too am jealous of your lube bucket as it looks almost new mine is rusty and dented big time and doesn't work anymore. and welcome to the forum. I use a blast cabinet for the steel plates and a da sander on the fibers just enough to knock most of the rust off but most of the ones I've done are way worse than the one's in your pictures as for the gaskets for the axle flanges a little squirt of carb cleaner and high heat {red or copper} silicone used sparingly will seal her up pretty good. what part of the country are you in as that looks like an ag tractor not many around my neck of the woods although mine has the 540 pto on it good luck with your endeavor russ      

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Thanks, I think I will try the silicone in place of the gasket. I also should make a new gasket for the steering clutch cover to prevent condensation from getting in there.  I am from Illinois but the tractor was purchased in Indiana. Not sure if it was bought from the original owner or not.

Pete

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Hey I work in Chicago!  If you ever need a hand, or if i get out that way, id love to see the progress! I live in indiana, where about did you purchase it?

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Good to know thanks! haha. It was purchased with a property in jasper county Indiana I believe but that was before my time.

Waiting on a few things from UPS but should be able to make some good progress on the clutches next week. Might even get the electrolysis tank setup this weekend.

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Crawler is finally back together! I hope to never have to do that job again. Still requires use of the brakes to turn with no load but comes to a stop when both steering clutch levers are pulled back. Now where can I find a blade and put it to use??

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