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Cargostar floor pan restoration

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Hey guys,

Can anybody post a pic or tell me if the shape of my floor is normal or not?  There's a large hump in the middle and a strange wrinkle on the vertical sheet going up to the seat pan.  The seams have all separated and need to be welded back up.  When tilting the cab, the lift cylinder makes the floor flex, pop and bend.  I think this stress point has bent the floor, but I've never sat in another Cargostar before so no way to know.  I'd like to address the repairs this summer while the weather is good here in Washington.

 

 

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Can't help but that is a nice looking Cargostar.

Dennis

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To this day that is still my favorite style of medium duty.  It would make a fine all around truck or tractor hauler. 

I have two brothers that spent many years behind the wheel of trucks and they tell me that the cabover cabs are very cramped, they have a pitchy ride and there is nothing between the driver and another vehicle except the windshield.   Has a great view of the road.

Nice looking machine!

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4 hours ago, oleman said:

 

I have two brothers that spent many years behind the wheel of trucks and they tell me that the cabover cabs are very cramped, they have a pitchy ride and there is nothing between the driver and another vehicle except the windshield.   Has a great view of the road.

 

Having rode Shotgun with Dad tens of thousands of miles in CO-190's, Emeryville's, and a couple GMC tiltcabs, they never really bothered me. Dad had a close call in one of the GMC's one night, a universal joint in the convoluted steering shaft came apart and he ground to a stop on the Iron Bridge on I-80 by Joliet, Ill on his way to the Chicago Stockyards.  I drove a couple TransStar's for a day or two when my short nose conventional RoadBoss was in the shop, I Much preferred something with a nose on it.

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Yea, there isn't anything but sheet metal protecting my knees in a front end collision.  Got damn good air brakes though!  Always gotta be strapped to the seat or you risk getting ejected through the windshield.  Great visibility and manuverabilit in these trucks so it's suited perfectly for the occasional machinery hauling I do in Seattle.  But a bear to drive due to no power steering and the 392 gas motor.  But I love this truck.  Just needs to be protected from a slow rusty death, much like all International trucks.

I've been picking away at the rust and body filler packed in the seams this week, and it looks like the floor should in fact have a bit of slope from the center.  Just not as much as it does now.  I'm going to remove the lift cylinder and put a hydraulic puller in there.  Might try a come-along first, but probably going to need the hydraulics.   The shifter gasket is 1/2" below the floor, so I'll pull until that gap gets eliminated or reduced.   Beyond that, as long as the broken seams line up decently at the back of the footwell I'll call it good and start welding in new steel.

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I bet someone has tried to lift the cab without releasing the cab latch, that would do that damage for sure. Weld the seams back up and I doubt you have to worry too much about it.

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Life has been busy, but I bought another flatbed so I can free this one up for some repairs.

I removed the cab tilt cylinder and put a come along in its place.  I pulled the floor down, and started massaging that buckled back wall and floor.  Got the vertical steel flattened out pretty good.

After grinding out quite a bit of bondo the root of the problem revealed itself.  The floor seams had rotted out, and four patch panels were slapped down in an attempt to get the truck back on the road.  There’s no structure on the drivers side at all, so I’m going to start cutting the floor out to repair this mess.  I’m no body man but I suppose a floor is as good a place to learn as any.

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If you could post pictures when you repair your floor I would appreciate it.  I am in a similar circumstance on a 1963 CO1800.

Thanks.

Corey

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I had a 1810B 24'ft rollback.I logged lotsa miles,hauled tons of equ.,tractors,stuff dead or alive.446 IH V8 gas.I was a great truck,hot in summer,cold in winter.Road rough but turned great.The one thing I could never figure about International though is their lack of driver comfort and sensibility.They put the am radio all the way across the cab in the dash,you needed 8ft arms or hired a man just to change the stations.

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On 12/1/2019 at 6:38 AM, 75cargostar said:

Hey so I have to replace the sub structure and floor that the cab hinge is on, any thoughts on how to approach this?

 

If it were me I'd unbolt the hinges, and with a few jacks lift the cab and block it up resting on top of the frame.  I don't have a crane or lift though.  I think if you get the weight off the hinges by strategically place your blocks so they're not in your way there will be room to cut out the old floor structure.  Obviously this would be better to do in a shop on a concrete floor if possible.

Once the new floor is tacked in, lower the cab down and bolt it back down to the frame.  Finish weld in place so you know it's aligned and going to fit!

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3 hours ago, Jacka said:

I had a 1810B 24'ft rollback.I logged lotsa miles,hauled tons of equ.,tractors,stuff dead or alive.446 IH V8 gas.I was a great truck,hot in summer,cold in winter.Road rough but turned great.The one thing I could never figure about International though is their lack of driver comfort and sensibility.They put the am radio all the way across the cab in the dash,you needed 8ft arms or hired a man just to change the stations.

My time driving this truck over the past year or so has shown me that these old IH's will wear out a mans body before the truck wears out.  It's a rough riding machine!  If only the sheet metal doesn't rust away.

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