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Pot to piss in ,and other old time sayings


lorenzo

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They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot & then once a day it was taken & Sold to the tannery.......if you had to do this to survive you were "Piss Poor"

But worse than that were the really poor folk who couldn't even afford to buy a pot......they "didn't have a pot to piss in" & were the lowest of the low

The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500s:

Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and they still smelled pretty good by June.. However, since they were starting to smell . ...... . Brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting Married.

Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the Bath water!"

Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof... Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."

There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.

The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, "Dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way. Hence: a thresh hold.

In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire.. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme: Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old. Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, "bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and chew the fat.

Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.

Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the upper crust.

Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would Sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial.. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake.

England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone-house, and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive... So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift.) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be, saved by the bell or was considered a dead ringer.

And that's the truth....Now, whoever said History was boring?

 

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You forgot the rest of that saying about not having "a pot to pi$$ in or a window to throw it out of". Thats the way I always heard it said anyway. 

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"The writings on the wall" originated from the Bible when the hand (God's hand)appeared and wrote on the wall the some king was weighed and found wanting and would die. Maybe someone knows the names and book...

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Went around HMS Victory many years ago and was told a few little sayings. But first an interesting fact. HMS Victory is the World's oldest commissioned warship being launched in 1765 and is the flagship of the first SeaLord. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Victory

 

Sayings

"Show a leg." Once conscripted to the Royal Navy seamen were not allowed to leave the ship due to the risk of them deserting. Hence wen were allowed on board to stay with the men. I guess whilst in Port. Since the seamen were meant to be out of bed and on watch at the appropriate times the order was issued to show a leg so that the officer could go round and feel the legs in the dark of the decks of the ship and could assertain if it was a man or woman  in the hammock.

 

"Son of a Gun." If a woman was on board whilst in labour (the mum to be who would be on a table between two cannons) and things were taking there time the cannons either side would be fired to speed the process up.

 

"Three Square Meals." Meals were served on a square plate three times a day.

"On the fiddle." The raised edge of the plate was calledthe fiddle. And plates were not supposed to be filled so food flowed over the edge. If you over filled your plate you were on the fiddle.

 

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Have a retired friend of mine that always saying he can't afford a down payment on a free lunch

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A favorite of my grandfathers was “poorer than skim pi$$ with the bubbles whipped off”

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He/she`s thicker than thistles

Old sayings had some logic to them.

Unlike today`s "it is what it is" or "at the end of the day" and my absolute favorite is when everything is "awesome"

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One of my favorite's that I heard at a tractor pull a few years ago was "its hotter than a tire fire out here" 

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In a professional meeting several years ago I was presenting a topic to about 75-100 colleges I once said "that's as worthless as tits on a boar hog!"  Now I grew up hearing that phrase often, and it just rolled off my tongue so easy, but the minute it did I was instantly embarrassed and everyone got a good laugh.   I'm 100% positive 90% of the room hadn't ever heard that one, but when you grow up with hogs on the farm it becomes part of your vocabulary! :)

 

Makes for a good story these days! :P 

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Grandpa had no use for "back slappers" , he felt driving the new vehicle in the first couple months of ownership was " putting on the dog" and my personal favorite- anyone who was really full of crap was said to "talk like a man with a paper a$$hole" no idea what it meant, but I loved it. 

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An old retired plumber that I knew would say " (he)(_____) couldn't pour piss out of a boot if the directions were wrote on the bottom !" 

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11 minutes ago, Rusty_Farmer said:

An old retired plumber that I knew would say " (he)(_____) couldn't pour piss out of a boot if the directions were wrote on the bottom !" 

My Dad would say that.

3 minutes ago, superih said:

So dumb he couldn't tell $hit from Apple butter.

Doesn't know s**t from Shinola

And although I only remember my Dad saying this one time, it has been stuck in my head for close to sixty years:

"Hotter than the hubs of H E LL.

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32 minutes ago, Rusty_Farmer said:

An old retired plumber that I knew would say " (he)(_____) couldn't pour piss out of a boot if the directions were wrote on the bottom !" 

"Directions written on the heel"  was the way my family used that saying.

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18 minutes ago, Art From DeLeon said:

My Dad would say that.

Doesn't know s**t from Shinola

And although I only remember my Dad saying this one time, it has been stuck in my head for close to sixty years:

"Hotter than the hubs of H E LL.

Daddy told me that Shinola was shoe polish when I asked what it was.  

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"One boy is a good boy, two boys is half a boy, and three boys ain't no boy at all"

There's a lot of truth in that saying in my observations of kids especially teenagers over the years. :)

Watched 3 boys steal drinks from the gas station last week.  They had it done before I realized what they had done :(

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The one that comes to mind is a few old timers we’re talking when someone’s name was brought up, one guy turned to another and said, “that’s right, you don’t like him do you?”

The ole guy took a sip and said, “I wouldn’t pi$$ down his throat If his heart was on fire!”  Not much grey area there, I laughed so hard

 

other favorites are

****#d up like Leroy’s fishing line

Harder than a whores heart

 

 

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One of these first days...my old boss ment will never happen...

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Grandpa used to say "cold enough to freeze the balls off 'n a brass monkey"

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Ever smelled something so bad it would "Drive  a buzzard off a gut wagon"? Descriptive and colourful language. 

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