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806 blew the fan belt so i got out my old M. Pu)s the spreader in 1st gear. Hey better than a horse. 1950 model still going strong

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Those old girls can still earn their keep!

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Don't tell Rick!

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My second job after high school was working on a hog farm. He had 4 tractors. 2 4020's, a Super M, and a B we mowed with. Don't remember the situation but we ended with the Super M on the spreader to. Worked just fine. I ground LOTS of feed with it to. Good tractor. 

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25 minutes ago, red tractor fever said:

and a B

We also had a B, a 1945.  Interesting to line up the belt!

best, randy 

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Great looking M. The old tractors are great to have around just for extra tractors.

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2 hours ago, ZachGrant said:

Don't tell Rick!

Hey now, I resnt that! I've often said that all an M was good for was pulling a small poo spreader:lol:!

1 hour ago, metamora farmall said:

Great looking M. The old tractors are great to have around just for extra tractors.

Thing wrong with that idea is that you have to have older small enough stuff for the M to run. Most operators in my area don't have any implements and M will handle anymore. Either too big or too small! Most of out local guys are running stuff that needs serious weight and HP to work. Last tightwad is looking at an 4X4. That would be my BIL (he hates articulate steering, says if he buys it it's mine to run!!!!!!!!!!!). Heck most guys here are running grain augers that call for 60-70 or more HP. Using tandem axle poo spreaders too that require 100 plus HP. When I was still farming the only 2 things my M would run when I quit was my 33 bushel spreader and a 6 foot mower. I was a very small fish in the local area. My quitting had nothing to do with money. I had enough income from other sources (including my Army retirement) to keep going as long as I wanted to. I was also doing grandpa's daycare. Farming (only because I wanted to) was getting in the way of family. I put my grandkids in front of my desires. Been bored a bit sense the cows got shipped to market (you guys should be able to tell......). But even me, being a small timer the M once I stopped doing idiot cubes was about worthless. And by the time that happened the M wasn't worth what I paid for it :(! I paid fair market when I got it.

Thing is I love tractors. I really love IH tractors from 1959 and newer. But I also love history and honesty.  The history and honesty is why I don't get along with most people who are brand blind. If you can't see the flaws you are not being honest. If you refuse to ackownledge real history? Again you ain't being honest. OK, I'm an a$$. I know that and accept that. I try my best to be an honest a$$. I don't expect people to agree with me. I expect them to respect my right to my own views and I expect them to be honest! Heck, I don't call anyone who likes Ms and Hs stupid. It's what they like. I'm OK with that. I think they are overrated and hyped up. I expect the same treatment. Even if you don't agree with me respect my right to my  opinion! If you think you can change my mind I'm willing to listen if you are willing to listen too.  Exchanging ideas is the one thing that has made America great. Trying to stop someone from expressing thier ideas is where it's all going wrong!

 

Rick

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7 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Thing is I love tractors. I really love IH tractors from 1959 and newer.

So do I and virtually every other member on this forum. I love all of them regardless of the year or their shortcomings. What they can or can't do really doesn't matter.

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BTO I worked for in HS and some summers in college raised 300-400 head of beef cattle every year. Any time it was dry we could and would haul manure.  He had two #44 Deere spreaders,  one with the typical three beaters and the one I liked the best had the big single drum beater. Very little bedding, just poop,  used a JD 60 to pull the spreader most times, the totally worn out A was backup.  The little Case 420 Industrial loader tractor with shuttle shift was impressive for it's age.

I'd have worked for half my hourly wage if I had a nice M or Super M like that one to pull the spreader!

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9 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Hey now, I resnt that! I've often said that all an M was good for was pulling a small poo spreader:lol:!

Thing wrong with that idea is that you have to have older small enough stuff for the M to run. Most operators in my area don't have any implements and M will handle anymore. Either too big or too small! Most of out local guys are running stuff that needs serious weight and HP to work. Last tightwad is looking at an 4X4. That would be my BIL (he hates articulate steering, says if he buys it it's mine to run!!!!!!!!!!!). Heck most guys here are running grain augers that call for 60-70 or more HP. Using tandem axle poo spreaders too that require 100 plus HP. When I was still farming the only 2 things my M would run when I quit was my 33 bushel spreader and a 6 foot mower. I was a very small fish in the local area. My quitting had nothing to do with money. I had enough income from other sources (including my Army retirement) to keep going as long as I wanted to. I was also doing grandpa's daycare. Farming (only because I wanted to) was getting in the way of family. I put my grandkids in front of my desires. Been bored a bit sense the cows got shipped to market (you guys should be able to tell......). But even me, being a small timer the M once I stopped doing idiot cubes was about worthless. And by the time that happened the M wasn't worth what I paid for it :(! I paid fair market when I got it.

Thing is I love tractors. I really love IH tractors from 1959 and newer. But I also love history and honesty.  The history and honesty is why I don't get along with most people who are brand blind. If you can't see the flaws you are not being honest. If you refuse to ackownledge real history? Again you ain't being honest. OK, I'm an a$$. I know that and accept that. I try my best to be an honest a$$. I don't expect people to agree with me. I expect them to respect my right to my own views and I expect them to be honest! Heck, I don't call anyone who likes Ms and Hs stupid. It's what they like. I'm OK with that. I think they are overrated and hyped up. I expect the same treatment. Even if you don't agree with me respect my right to my  opinion! If you think you can change my mind I'm willing to listen if you are willing to listen too.  Exchanging ideas is the one thing that has made America great. Trying to stop someone from expressing thier ideas is where it's all going wrong!

 

Rick

Well Rick,  The M seems to be working fine at pulling that manure spreader. 

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4 hours ago, TomH said:

So do I and virtually every other member on this forum. I love all of them regardless of the year or their shortcomings. What they can or can't do really doesn't matter.

Well that's the difference between a true collector and a user. If you can't use why have it?

 

Rick

 

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My question is why would you put an 806 on that?  We pull tandem axle apron spreaders with M's here in pa.  That M should be on that all the time!

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3 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

My question is why would you put an 806 on that?  We pull tandem axle apron spreaders with M's here in pa.  That M should be on that all the time!

Power steering. Faster . A whole bunch of reasons. 806 handles it especially with a lug of packed manure

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Got a fan belt at Napa today $37. Pretty proud of that belt. Got the 806 back on the spreader.. tonite i am taking the belt off and locking in a safe till morning

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21 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Thing wrong with that idea is that you have to have older small enough stuff for the M to run.

Been really interesting reading all the comments on here!  Guess times change.  Back when I was growing up we all  knew what he meant when dad would say - "Go get the big tractor" (we knew that he he meant "go get the M").

best, randy

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Just talked to a neighbor this morning. He's on his way to pick up a new grain auger. 13"X 100 plus feet. He says according to the maker minimum HP is 125! Same guy has a manure spreader I really don't think a 560, much less and M would handle loaded.

 

And I guess that's the way I look at it. If you can't use it, it ain't much good. And please don't take that wrong either. If you want one then you need it IMO. Maybe it isn't a practical want but this is America, long as it's legal and you can afford it...…...well whatever floats yer boat!

Rick

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Funny how things are so different in various areas of the country.  I understand Rick; I like old stuff, but I won't buy something I can't put to use.  Course, I don't consider myself a collector.  BUT - we get a lot of midwest cast-offs here in Appalachia.  Lot of folks run 4 row equipment, at the largest, and a "big" tractor here is 130hp!

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I first pulled our JD R spreader with the '39 H, then the Super H, even moved a couple loads on day with the '40 JD B,  Deere claimec the spreader was 95 bushel,  they must have REALLY piled the poop high to get that number.  The BTO's #44's were conservitively rated 185 bushel.  I agree they seemed to be twice the size of our R but you compare the spreader to our BIG EWC/Oliver flare box wagon the R was probably 60-65 bu, the #44 about 125.

I guess I have to ask why all these tiny 15-20-maybe 25 hp sub-compact tractors sell in such great numbers.  Why do Citiots spend $15,000-$20,000 on one of them to mow, push snow, etc,  when you can buy a nice H,M, C, A, B, etc for $1000 to $3000 for a pristine restoration and do the same jobs?

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7 minutes ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I first pulled our JD R spreader with the '39 H, then the Super H, even moved a couple loads on day with the '40 JD B,  Deere claimec the spreader was 95 bushel,  they must have REALLY piled the poop high to get that number.  The BTO's #44's were conservitively rated 185 bushel.  I agree they seemed to be twice the size of our R but you compare the spreader to our BIG EWC/Oliver flare box wagon the R was probably 60-65 bu, the #44 about 125.

I guess I have to ask why all these tiny 15-20-maybe 25 hp sub-compact tractors sell in such great numbers.  Why do Citiots spend $15,000-$20,000 on one of them to mow, push snow, etc,  when you can buy a nice H,M, C, A, B, etc for $1000 to $3000 for a pristine restoration and do the same jobs?

Power steering might be a big factor on that one as well as hydrostatic transmission. They are also a little easier to get on and off of. You also have to remember those newer tractors are just a tad more forgiving for idiots which most of the buyers are at operating tractors. The old Farmalls have a higher center of gravity than the newer subcompacts. If they get themselves into a bind the older one will get them in trouble even quicker than the new one. You also have to remember that most of these people want the latest and greatest, not something that is 70 some years old even though it is capable of doing the job.

Rick, you do realize that not all farms are like the ones in your area. Around my neck of the woods there are still a lot of us running 6 row equipment and in our neighborhood I can count only 2 guys with articulating 4wd tractors. The majority of our fields Fall in the 10 to 20 acre bracket. The biggest we work is 44 acres. We are working slowly at making the fields bigger but there are a lot of trees in these fencerows and we cut a lot of firewood in the winter. Yeah there are bigger fields but you try not to dig a hole to China like you guys apparently do.

I think I would throughly enjoy watching some of your neighbors work ground around here. A few passes with there 4 wheelers and disc rippers should yield tons of rock filled fun. Even with mechanical rock pickers they will have hours upon hours of rock picking.

I guess what I'm saying is just because things are done with certain sized equipment and tools in your area doesn't mean that it is done that way across the board. 

 

 

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8 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I first pulled our JD R spreader with the '39 H, then the Super H, even moved a couple loads on day with the '40 JD B,  Deere claimec the spreader was 95 bushel,  they must have REALLY piled the poop high to get that number.  The BTO's #44's were conservitively rated 185 bushel.  I agree they seemed to be twice the size of our R but you compare the spreader to our BIG EWC/Oliver flare box wagon the R was probably 60-65 bu, the #44 about 125.

I guess I have to ask why all these tiny 15-20-maybe 25 hp sub-compact tractors sell in such great numbers.  Why do Citiots spend $15,000-$20,000 on one of them to mow, push snow, etc,  when you can buy a nice H,M, C, A, B, etc for $1000 to $3000 for a pristine restoration and do the same jobs?

Lets see, good hydraulics, 3 point, power steering just to name a few reasons.  We see a lost of the CUTs with blowers on. Plus they love to show the neighbors what they can afford. Their recreation time is at the golf club, lake/beach ECT, not is some dingy shop restoring a tractor.

6 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

Power steering might be a big factor on that one as well as hydrostatic transmission. They are also a little easier to get on and off of. You also have to remember those newer tractors are just a tad more forgiving for idiots which most of the buyers are at operating tractors. The old Farmalls have a higher center of gravity than the newer subcompacts. If they get themselves into a bind the older one will get them in trouble even quicker than the new one. You also have to remember that most of these people want the latest and greatest, not something that is 70 some years old even though it is capable of doing the job.

Rick, you do realize that not all farms are like the ones in your area. Around my neck of the woods there are still a lot of us running 6 row equipment and in our neighborhood I can count only 2 guys with articulating 4wd tractors. The majority of our fields Fall in the 10 to 20 acre bracket. The biggest we work is 44 acres. We are working slowly at making the fields bigger but there are a lot of trees in these fencerows and we cut a lot of firewood in the winter. Yeah there are bigger fields but you try not to dig a hole to China like you guys apparently do.

I think I would throughly enjoy watching some of your neighbors work ground around here. A few passes with there 4 wheelers and disc rippers should yield tons of rock filled fun. Even with mechanical rock pickers they will have hours upon hours of rock picking.

I guess what I'm saying is just because things are done with certain sized equipment and tools in your area doesn't mean that it is done that way across the board. 

 

 

I know that some guys can still use the smaller stuff. But even then when I get over in east MN where most of the farms are smaller? I see people using 450's and newer. Big issue is implements. No one makes a mounted cultivator for an M anymore. Or ground life implements either.

Lot of guys here do smaller fields. My BIL who farms over 1500 acres does a couple that are pretty small. One of his bigger small fields is 15 acres. I dug 47 rocks out of that field a couple of years ago with my backhoe. So we do know about rocks here. Lot of the guys here hire someone with an excavator to come in and take out rocks for the bigger ones. Thing here is that the little guy is just about gone. And there are some many 50 plus HP tractors here that there is no justification cost wise in running something that's just too small for most jobs. Got a neighbor who crops about 90 acres and works off farm. His main tractor is a 5020 JD. Nothing wrong with that. Few smaller guys running 06, 56 and 66 series Farmalls too.  Few guys with 17/1800 series Olivers. Don't know why but you hardly see any AC's around here anymore. But there are a fair number of White tractors just  bit south and east of me including a couple of 4X4s. But you seldom see anyone making idiot cubes anymore. Everything is either big squares or round bales. Got 3 families local that bail a few, very few idiot cubes. The small timers all work off farm so they been buying bigger tractors to get the work done faster. Heck few even have livestock anymore.

Rick

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8 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I guess I have to ask why all these tiny 15-20-maybe 25 hp sub-compact tractors sell in such great numbers.  Why do Citiots spend $15,000-$20,000 on one of them to mow, push snow, etc,  when you can buy a nice H,M, C, A, B, etc for $1000 to $3000 for a pristine restoration and do the same jobs?

I finally broke down and bought a five year old used 45 horse JD, and here's why.

I had been doing everything with my inherited regular C. I could acquire 100 tractors in my life, and the C will be my favorite. However, I couldn't run it for a week, without a small failure, and then waiting a week for parts to arrive. Even stupid little one-dollar parts would put me down for substantial time. It really was just a matter of needing something less than 60 years old. I don't regret it for a second. I like to use old tractors, but when a job NEEDS to get done, like clearing the driveway after work, before the kid needs a ride to practice, and blah blah blah, I need something that's got more life in it. The diesel engine is bulletproof. the seat is comfortable, the hydraulics are fantastic and reliable, and while my local dealer sucks at stocking parts, they're closer to me than my old C's parts.

I did get sucked into an off-topic conversation.

 

I love those photos of the beautiful old machine earning its keep. There's an interesting video on the you tubes of a farm somewhere in the midwest where they have some nice old Steigers. The owner has a rule, no new old tractors in the stable unless they can earn their keep. I think it makes owning them that much more enjoyable, so good on ya!

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32 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

idiot cubes

???

small square bale hay?

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1 hour ago, KWRB said:

???

small square bale hay?

Yep, at least that's what they are called around here. Pretty labor intensive. 

Rick

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13 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Lets see, good hydraulics, 3 point, power steering just to name a few reasons.  We see a lost of the CUTs with blowers on. Plus they love to show the neighbors what they can afford. Their recreation time is at the golf club, lake/beach ECT, not is some dingy shop restoring a tractor.

Rick

I disagree with almost ALL of that.  Not a lot of excess HP to create more hydraulic pressure and flow, one or two remotes standard, any more gets really costly.  Have to laugh how fond of 3-point hitch you are.  If these Citiots ever discover pull type implements,  Hook & unhook with a single hitch pin, and forget their 3 pt with quick couplers they spend another $300 to $500 on, they would be shocked and amazed how fast & easy they could go from implement to implement.  Even with hydraulics and pto you could go from one job to the next in minutes, and that includes greasing the new implement.  Years ago I could go from plow to disk to cultimulcher, to silage chopper or mower/conditioner in minutes.

Power steering is an advantage, especially on loader tractors, and other tractors with mounted frt attachments. I never got to cultivate corn with a tractor without power steering,  bet it was a B...ch turning on headlands with a 4 row cultivator.  But with no power steering, I managed to put most of the 250 hours a year on my Super H. Without the loader it doesn't steer that hard.

I've got a snow blower sitting under my work bench for my one garden tractor,  put it on ONCE about 12 years ago when I had my broken left leg,  could run the garden tractor side-saddle, clutch with my right leg. Hated, really HATED the blowing snow all over the garden tractor, aged the paint decades in a couple years. No blowing snow with my Super H and loader mounted blade.  These tiny compact tractors have lots of plastic, guess they aren't painted, don't rust.  Hydro transmissions are popular because most of the nerds can't figure out a clutch and twin stick transmission. Power sapping noisy whining inconsistent speed transmission. A hydro appeals to the same people an automatic in a car/ truck appeals to.  I just bought my personal First auto trans equipped pickup in 48 years of driving. Yes, I bought a couple cars with automatic trans for the wife, but also made her drive a 5-speed Mustang GT for nine years!  I bought an auto equipped 1/2 ton truck because NOBODY makes a light truck with manual trans anymore. Would have had to special order a medium duty to get a 5 or 6 spd manual.

Might be something to the Show-Off idea,  guys at the sub-compact tractor forum I lurk at,  they all seem to trade tractors to a larger model every 2-3 years, will not be without a warrantee. There have been 5-6 guys lay their little tractors over on the side because the tractor is so small and they carried the load in the loader bucket too high. I've pushed snow with my Farmall for 24 years now! Tractor is 64 years old, had to replace the battery and have starter rebuilt 3 years ago, replaced brake disks 5 yrs ago. Starter was a supposed rebuild from a salvage yard in western Iowa from 1984. Was probably time for a Good rebuild.

Guys on this forum I lurk at say nothing about spending time golfing, couple have a boat, couple more have a big travel trailers. Actually, quite a few DO restore antique tractors as a hobby.

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