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Woodweller

Big Six Brake Drums

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I'm new to this IH knowledge base, but I'm wondering about the situation with pre-1969 3/4 ton brake drums.  Realizing they are exceedingly rare (a website with IH parts is charging $1000 each!?), has any IH owning machinist ever come up with a way to sleeve old drums with a new wear surface?  We sleeve engine blocks with new cylinders, why not this?  A steel sleeve would have an expansion rate higher than an iron drum, so theoretically the sleeve should always expand to tighten into the drum rather than the drum expand to loosen around the sleeve.  A lathe to machine the drum and sleeve, an oven to expand the drum and a press and jig to press them together seems within reason.  Might drums crack?  Could sleeves rotate?  Are there ways around these problems to make them safe?  I may be way off somewhere and don't mind being enlightened, but it seems there's a market for $2-300 re-sleeved brake drums for those IH guys who are left with axle swaps as their only option.

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I see no reason why a sleeve wouldn't work, Buick made aluminum drums for years with iron liners.

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Good idea, and possibly pinned for extra safety. However, there's always that liability thing to deal with. Hate to say it, but always someone out there wanting to sue for no reason. Also, where's a guy get the cores?  Not sure there's too many of them around. I have a cple axles, didn't know they wanted so much for just the drums. Crazy

Mark

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Our 93 K2500 Chevy has 13" X 3.5" rear drums.  Almost all the larger pickups until the late 90's had rear drums also. 

In the early 70's I had a 67 Cadillac (by far the best GM vehicle I ever owned) it still had 4 wheel drums, believe the fronts were aluminum drums with CI liners.  Never had a brake issue with the Caddy.

 

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On 4/25/2018 at 12:46 PM, R Pope said:

I see no reason why a sleeve wouldn't work, Buick made aluminum drums for years with iron liners.

I thought that was Pontiac with the Wide 8 wheels with aluminum hubs on some of the 1960 full size cars.  Kelsey-Hayes made them for Pontiac.

 

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I would think a metal spray or plasma spray metal transfer would work better than a sleeve. Both Ferrous and non-ferrous materials can be sprayed and bond securely with the base metal.  Company I worked at 20 years ago I sent out rough machined stainless steel pistons,  looked more like what I'd call a plunger, and had them Colmonoy plasma coated. Colmonoy was a mix of Tungsten, Chromium, and pure carbon,  really really hard and  heat & abrasion resistant.  A division of Coors Brewery in Norman, Oklahoma did Ceramic plasma coating on another family of plungers for me.  Machine tool company always recommended plasma spray weld to repair new parts that were machined undersize. Much better adhesion than welding, more consistent deposit.

     All that said, I would think converting to disk brakes would be cheaper and fewer problems with better brakes in the deal.

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Yes, discs and newer brakes would be nice, but I'm looking a a 1961 C120 3/4 ton that the ad says needs "brake work" and a few other things.  If I knew there was another alternative to whacked out prices on drums or changing axles before it could be driven, I just might pull the trigger.  And what might be a reasonable price range for one of those C120's with a 241 six, in Travelette (4 door) form?

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I had an IHC with 6 bolt duals and the drums from a Dodge 1 ton fit right on!

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There are companies that reline brake drums, both aluminum and steel drums.  I remember finding them on the internet.  Don't know what they charge.  As I recall, they turn the drums extra large, then press in a liner, then turn it to the proper size.  They end up with a new drum, exact factory appearance, balanced, and the wear surface is supposed to be much stronger than the original factory drum.  Sorry, I don't recall the name of the company, but a google search I'm sure will find it again.  I came across it when I was looking for a company that will re-sleeve wheel cylinders.

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