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Binderdan

56 and 66 series sloppy shifter rebuild

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When I bought my Farmall 856 Custom one of the problems I faced was the range/reverse shift lever was very sloppy, to the point it wouldn't function without assistance from a pry bar or screwdriver. I did a lot of internet searching and found many threads about this as it seems to be a common issue with the 56 series and 66 series Farmall tractors. Unfortunately all of the information I found was scattered and had no pictures or part numbers. This thread is to help others that were in my shoes wishing to see what they are up against before tearing into it. 

This project was undertaken after other shift linkage issues were corrected. All loose roll pins were replaced, along with bushings and ball and socket joints in the shifting linkage. 

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I started by removing the cowl cover, then the gear shift cover, and shift lever housing. 

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Now all the shifter pivot points can be seen. This is the worn out stuff that needs replaced to make your tractor shift like new again. Unfortunately this projects is not cheap. 

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The new parts I purchased for this project are shown above. I bought the A&I kit containing 4 parts. A-404855R1 is the large cylindrical sleeve the collars pivot on. A-529489R1 is the range collar.  A-387987R1 is the shift pivot arm (the small collar). A-529490R1 is the reverse collar. 

I also purchased the bolt for the shift pivot arm since mine had worn out threads. Its is an A&I A-397986R1 shown on the right of the above picture. I purchased the detent springs shown in the center. Case IH part number 397991R1.

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I disconnected the ball and socket joints to begin disassembly.  Don't mind my wiring mess. The new harness is the next project...

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Remove the bolt from the speed shift lever and wiggle it, working toward you. Some penetrating oil helps. When it comes off you will also need to remove the woodroff key. In hindsight I wish I had bought a new woodroff key rather than fight the old one back in. 

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The old collars on mine were two piece, the new replacement ones are single piece. Takes oil and some wiggling, prying and hammering to slide the collars off. 

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The 15/16 bolt head holds the range lever onto the collar. Mine had damaged and loose threads. Its easier to remove now rather than after the collar is off. 

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 Slide (or pry and beat) the collars off.  Now the collars are off you need to remove the woodroff key so you can slide the inner shaft (speed lever shaft) through and out the other side. 

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Removing the woodroff key was a pain and it was slightly mangled. I was able to use a file and remove the damage from removal.  I pulled the speed lever shaft out the other side and cleaned it up with emery cloth and a rag. 

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Now the sleeve that the collars pivot on needs to be removed. It is pressed into the dash tower. The bushing in the center must be retained to go into the new one. Unless you bought a new bushing. I did not. 

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I used a tire spoon that fit through the speed shaft hole and beat it around the edges of the sleeve being careful not to damage the bushing in the center. 

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It came out nicely. There is another method using a pipe, washers, nuts, and all-thread to make a puller as seen on a YouTube video but I didn't have those things laying around. 

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I used a brass drift to beat the bushing out the other side of the sleeve. I don't recommend this. A press would be ideal.  

 

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The old bushing must be pressed into the sleeve making sure the holes on the bushing align with the holes on the sleeve.

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Then drive the sleeve into the dash tower. I cleaned out the hole well before doing so to make it drive in easier. Use something in between the sleeve and your hammer to avoid mushrooming the end of the sleeve or damaging the bushing. 

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The detent springs install on the reverse and range collars like this. Except they go onto your new collars, not the old ones like I started to do in the picture. 

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Before sliding the collars on I put a film of silicone grease on the inside part. I may regret that someday since I live in a dusty area. But I did it so there's no going back now.  I also reinstalled the speed lever shaft and woodruff key.

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I reinstalled the shift pivot collar and installed the shift lever using the new bolt. It fit so much nicer than the old one.  I also put some silicone grease on the shank of the bolt where the shift lever pivots.

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I ran into an issue with the reverse collar. The casting of the collar interfered with the one beside it. So I took my grinder and ground the upper inside portion to clear the other collar.

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Looks so much better and fits so much tighter too!!

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Reinstall the speed lever onto the shaft and tighten the bolt. I used some anti-seize on the threads of the bolt.

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Then I reinstalled the shift housing and covers. 

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After replacing these worn out parts and adjusting the linkage it shifts so much better!!  I had about $300 in parts for this project and it took about 3 hours.

I hope someone has found this helpful and informative. 

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Thats only 1/2 of the slop. Other half is in the bottom linkages, pins and yokes and pulling the range cover off the transmission and rebuilding that too as well as replacing and adjusting transmission break. Its about $600+ to rebuild it all. Also have to drill and tap grease  zert hole on new shift collar. 

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I need to do this on my 806, is the same kit available for it also?

 

 

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Thanks for the slide show tutorial.  Now, maybe we can get Long Farms to do one showing how to update the lower shift linkage.  One on replacing the axle bearings on a 5488 would be nice, too.  And one.... never mind.  Would be nice to have a tutorial archive on this site so it can be referenced.  Just wondering if those parts are still available through CNH?

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4 minutes ago, rsscott said:

Thanks for the slide show tutorial.  Now, maybe we can get Long Farms to do one showing how to update the lower shift linkage.  One on replacing the axle bearings on a 5488 would be nice, too.  And one.... never mind.  Would be nice to have a tutorial archive on this site so it can be referenced.  Just wondering if those parts are still available through CNH?

Brian can add it to this thread? 

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I can, videos before will help show slop. My 1066 needs rebuilt. Sometimes it takes longer to adjust linkages to get it all to line up and shift correctly than rebuilding it all. One of the biggest things of sloppy shiffting is operators not waiting 3 seconds for trans brake to slow enough to shift smooth or keeping it adjusted and greasing the shift collars. When 100% you can shift with only 2 fingers and with fresh detents they fall into High/low and stay there. Speed plate is 10x more work to get to and rebuild. Its a great post. Should be more how to threads with lots of pics and videos on here. Above is how its done. Take notes and take pics. My favorite thing about rebuilding them is the collar spring clips holding levers firmly in place. I wasnt around to shift a brand new one but ran some low hr ones. Would have like to shifted new so i could compare to rebuilt. Most guys up north wont know about this, but Factory TA deleted IHs normally shift better and dont ware as fast. 

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2 hours ago, 806Jordy said:

I need to do this on my 806, is the same kit available for it also?

 

 

806 has different style shifters.

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4 hours ago, 806Jordy said:

I need to do this on my 806, is the same kit available for it also?

 

 

The 806 Range lever has a replaceable busing, As far as I know the pivot shaft is not available, at least from CNH but could be easily replicated.

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8 hours ago, jass1660 said:

806 has different style shifters.

Yes I am aware of that, and was looking for a similar kit to rebuild my 806.

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Nice descriptive post.

You can get the shaft that goes through the colum, and the bushings between it and the shifting levers, for an 806. 

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Excellent tutorial, thanks so much! I have an 856 that could use this treatment as well.

Adjusting/renewing the transmission brake was mentioned in the following comments. I'm wondering if someone with the experience could give a brief description of how a properly functioning transmission brake should work, how to adjust the transmission brake, and how one would be able to determine when the transmission brake is worn out and needs replacement. When shifting my 856 I have to wait for what seems a long time for the gears to stop spinning so I don't grind them. I thought this was normal, but maybe not?. Thanks so much.

 

Keith-

 

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Binderdan:  many thanks for the photos and description.  No doubt a lot of folks will find it helpful

 

KeithFink:  off topic, but do you happen to  be the fellow who does (did?) the modeling articles for "The Milwaukee Railroader" magazine?  If so, my compliments- just happened to be looking at a couple of your projects in back issues and you do fantastic work

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instead of using the small linkages we have been using from a and I the  larger ball linkages

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12 hours ago, KeithFink said:

Excellent tutorial, thanks so much! I have an 856 that could use this treatment as well.

Adjusting/renewing the transmission brake was mentioned in the following comments. I'm wondering if someone with the experience could give a brief description of how a properly functioning transmission brake should work, how to adjust the transmission brake, and how one would be able to determine when the transmission brake is worn out and needs replacement. When shifting my 856 I have to wait for what seems a long time for the gears to stop spinning so I don't grind them. I thought this was normal, but maybe not?. Thanks so much.

 

Keith-

 

Your Operator manual has procedure for adjusting engine clutch an transmission brake. Below is copy from it. 

Also clutch and Transmission brake parts . Also clutch housing parts.  Also source of new brake lever.

https://www.tractorpartsasap.com/Transmission-Brake-Lever-Assembly-p/111367.htm

Once you get clutch adjusted  correctly , adjust  transmission  brake operating rod as stated in procedure. Start tractor and test shifting. If gears clash, adjust transmission brake rod clevis some more as described. If gear clash continues , brake needs replacement. Fairly simple job to do. Drain oil from plug in the square cover on underside of clutch housing . Remove hairpin cotter from brake rod clevis pin. Remove bottom cover and gasket.    The brake rod is held in place in the cover by a 1/4 inch pin through the cover, it engages a notch in the rod. (Pin must be removed before rod can be moved sideways enough to remove rod from brake lever.) Remove the retaining clip from just beside the brake lever. Rod and woodruff key can now be withdrawn from brake lever . Install new o-ring and brake lever. Reinstall retaining ring beside brake lever . Reinstall 1/4 inch pin . Reinstall cover to clutch housing using a new gasket. Connect brake operating rod and adjust by instructions. 

Capture  Clutch & Trans. Brake.JPG

Capture Clutch & Trans. Brake 2.JPG

Cluch pedal and Trans.Brake parts 001.jpg

Clutch housing 001.jpg

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17 hours ago, 234-IA said:

 

KeithFink:  off topic, but do you happen to  be the fellow who does (did?) the modeling articles for "The Milwaukee Railroader" magazine?  If so, my compliments- just happened to be looking at a couple of your projects in back issues and you do fantastic work

Ha! Yes, I used to be the guy who wrote the modeling articles. Thank you for the kind words. I had to beg off that responsibility several years ago - the growing family and growing herd left me no more free time to get anything accomplished in that area.

 

Keith- 

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14 hours ago, 7and8and1456 said:

Your Operator manual has procedure for adjusting engine clutch an transmission brake. Below is copy from it. 

Also clutch and Transmission brake parts . Also clutch housing parts.  Also source of new brake lever.

https://www.tractorpartsasap.com/Transmission-Brake-Lever-Assembly-p/111367.htm

Once you get clutch adjusted  correctly , adjust  transmission  brake operating rod as stated in procedure. Start tractor and test shifting. If gears clash, adjust transmission brake rod clevis some more as described. If gear clash continues , brake needs replacement. Fairly simple job to do. Drain oil from plug in the square cover on underside of clutch housing . Remove hairpin cotter from brake rod clevis pin. Remove bottom cover and gasket.    The brake rod is held in place in the cover by a 1/4 inch pin through the cover, it engages a notch in the rod. (Pin must be removed before rod can be moved sideways enough to remove rod from brake lever.) Remove the retaining clip from just beside the brake lever. Rod and woodruff key can now be withdrawn from brake lever . Install new o-ring and brake lever. Reinstall retaining ring beside brake lever . Reinstall 1/4 inch pin . Reinstall cover to clutch housing using a new gasket. Connect brake operating rod and adjust by instructions. 

 

Excellent information. Thank you very much for taking the time to send it along!

 

Keith-

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Figured I would bring this back to the front page, I was thinking about it, and wanted to see the rebuild process again.

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I’m bringing this back to the top, I need to get parts for my dads 1456, and tackle this soon!! 

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Take a good look before you start buying parts.

If you are grinding range gears, try popping it in low then into high.  Stops tranny or slows it down.

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Those parts are available as a kit. They are on eBay, got one last winter...... 

Update, the one I got was made by Hy-Capacity...... Fit perfectly...

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Well I just finished up the 1456, what a joke!! A&I must stand for Ain’t nothing we build is close to right & Impossible to make work! Every piece I receive for this task needed to have the grinder on it, a drill bit run through it, a hole threaded, or moved.  And go through all that to find out just like Long Farms said earlier in this thread, my problem is under the shift cover, so off with the hoods and steering column.  I almost want to put the factory shift collars back on to keep it more original! 

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