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Blacksmithing?

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Anyone think they can blacksmith?

 

 

Rick

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I would like to see the forge that heated that up.  Something tells me it isn't a hand crank coal forge like mine....

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Bloke I know watched a mechanic grind a replacement rear axle pinion with an angle grinder on the street in the Phillipines

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I liked the video.      But was kinda wandering what that part was used for ?

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That was a butt weld flange for carbon piping. Such as a oil/gas pipeline would use or anything else that may call for large bore pipe. It would be welded on the end of a joint of pipe in order to bolt on a valve, another section of pipe or anything else that maybe needed.

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Thanks I see it know. I have actually installed some of those lol.    Just not that big.     More like 14" water main.   I didn't weld it.      

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I worked for a company that owned an old forging company up in WV that made forged crane hooks. They used an old steam hammer, and basically did just like these guys with the labor it takes to move it while making the forging. They got big money for those hooks.

 

D

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37 minutes ago, Dave McCallister said:

I worked for a company that owned an old forging company up in WV that made forged crane hooks. They used an old steam hammer, and basically did just like these guys with the labor it takes to move it while making the forging. They got big money for those hooks.

 

D

My one former Boss and I visited suppliers all over the country,  investment foundries,  steel and iron foundries, stamping suppliers, and several forging suppliers.  The first time we saw a steam hammer was at Interstate Forging Southwest in Navasota, Texas.  Scared the heck out of us it was so violent!  Three hits with a 50 ton steam hammer changed a 5 inch round corner square piece of steel 3-4 inches long into a front spindle for a Ford T-Bird or Mercury Cougar. Every hour a part went into a computerized test fixture and all critical measurements checked and saved to memory.  Every shipment to Ford had a computer disk with those measurements,  time and tempurature recording dials from heat treat furnace, and material test reports from the raw steel supplier.

I Really doubt that China forge shop would be able to supply similar quality documentation.

If you want to see a Real open die forge shop in action,  check websites for A.Finkl and Sons,  Ellwood City Forge, and Scot Forge.  I inherited a supplier named Baltimore Specialty Steel Corp, they had a tired wobbly 2-post Bliss press trying to make open die forgings and also stainless round bar in coils for bolt companies.  Looks like they no longer exist. I told my employer to get the heck out of there 25 years ago.  They fought me tooth and nail but finally ended up using Scot Forge like I tried to get them to.

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Recently watched activity like that on the streets in Bolivia. 

Necessity is the mother of invention.

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Looks like they are using OSHA approved safety gear!  Hearing protection anyone??

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I think that those blanks now travel to a machine shop and then they would be more recognizable

 

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Mentioning the quality of the steel, having worked Industrial construction such as refineries, petro-chem, power plants, steel mills, etc., etc., the statement about a lower quality is true. The developing 3rd world countries definitely have an inferior quality steel. Porosity  (air pockets) was a big problem, especially in stainless, but due to our trade agreements and with a "global economy" I don't see a change in the future.

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The label will read:  " Made in China to our exacting Standards.  Designed in USA".

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44 minutes ago, ArkLa 1086 said:

Mentioning the quality of the steel, having worked Industrial construction such as refineries, petro-chem, power plants, steel mills, etc., etc., the statement about a lower quality is true. The developing 3rd world countries definitely have an inferior quality steel. Porosity  (air pockets) was a big problem, especially in stainless, but due to our trade agreements and with a "global economy" I don't see a change in the future.

yeah, we see that all the time.  New parts and fittings made with the best computer and blah blah blah are junk, but some old fittings that have been laying in the yard for 30 years are great.  We had a batch of fittings that started to delaminate this year, you would weld them and they could watch them pull apart and open up.  I sure doubt that in 40 years they will be doing maintenance or and addition and marveling at what we built

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1 hour ago, AKwelder said:

yeah, we see that all the time.  New parts and fittings made with the best computer and blah blah blah are junk, but some old fittings that have been laying in the yard for 30 years are great.  We had a batch of fittings that started to delaminate this year, you would weld them and they could watch them pull apart and open up.  I sure doubt that in 40 years they will be doing maintenance or and addition and marveling at what we built

I've fought that problem.  China doesn't de-slag castings & forgings like mills in the USA do.  Their wrought metals delaminate along the oxide layer running through the part.  I've had it happen on 1/4 inch diameter drawn special copper alloy parts,  I've heard of 1-1/4" and 1-1/2" thick hot rolled steel plate burned out on burning benches, then welded into machine main frames and the steel pulls apart leaving a quarter inch welded together and an inch or more hanging in the breeze.  I won't say who the mfg is,  don't want to P-O anybody,  but the machines are still out there with only some of the worst defects fixed.  Also heard of imported axle/hub castings with so much centerline shrink the hub portion Broke off the axle portion.  They ultrasonically tested everything but didn't fix everything.

Yeah, I wouldn't trust Chinese metals one little bit!  I used to think the sent the USA all the junk and kept the good stuff for themselves but I think they use the junk in China too.

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2 minutes ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I've fought that problem.  China doesn't de-slag castings & forgings like mills in the USA do.  Their wrought metals delaminate along the oxide layer running through the part.  I've had it happen on 1/4 inch diameter drawn special copper alloy parts,  I've heard of 1-1/4" and 1-1/2" thick hot rolled steel plate burned out on burning benches, then welded into machine main frames and the steel pulls apart leaving a quarter inch welded together and an inch or more hanging in the breeze.  I won't say who the mfg is,  don't want to P-O anybody,  but the machines are still out there with only some of the worst defects fixed.  Also heard of imported axle/hub castings with so much centerline shrink the hub portion Broke off the axle portion.  They ultrasonically tested everything but didn't fix everything.

Yeah, I wouldn't trust Chinese metals one little bit!  I used to think the sent the USA all the junk and kept the good stuff for themselves but I think they use the junk in China too.

What is worrisome is when you get a print and the part doesn't meet certain specs so they send you a new drawing of the same part with correct spec no revision but back dated a couple of months. Where is the worker wearing sandals? Usually the china/india videos like this always seem to have at least one worker who is wearing sandals.

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4 minutes ago, BOBSIH856 said:

What is worrisome is when you get a print and the part doesn't meet certain specs so they send you a new drawing of the same part with correct spec no revision but back dated a couple of months. Where is the worker wearing sandals? Usually the china/india videos like this always seem to have at least one worker who is wearing sandals.

OMG.....  That would not fly at the last company I worked at.  What really P-O'd Me was I got copies of engineering change notices and modified prints giving China +/- .015" tolerances while my domestic stamping suppliers still had to hold +/- .003".  And by our quality procedures I was supposed to mail that print to My suppliers?,!?   I walked into the QA mgr's office, explained the problem and left the whole mess on HIS desk.  It never happened again,  and I know China made lots more different stampings.  We almost lost our ISO 9001 certificate for lack of drawing control. Probably a valid finding, but we over-compensated.

China wanted to use their domestic copper alloy to make my parts that were part of a potable water system, I know it had a couple percent lead, which won't pass NSF.  One mill in China made three heats of my special copper alloy, CDA-642,  each heat had an element WAY out of spec, first was aluminum, next was iron, then lead.  I blew up, sent China a scathing fax,  told them to Not contact me or my boss until they had a mill that could control their process so they could meet our chemistries, then told them to send me a sample, pound or two to double check.  Two days later I got an email my sample was coming, and strangely enough, it was O-K.

That company had a production plant in China, plus a corporate purchasing group dedicated to finding low cost sources for our domestic plants.  They would find a supplier and walk away, wash their hands of any problems.

I worked on trying to get three little parts from China for almost four years, and I bet they still haven't got approved.

China is just bad news on metal parts.  They machine just fine, special coatings no problem,  they just can't keep the slag out of metals.

 

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Watched a piece of 2.5" thick 20X12 ft  plate steel ( from china) big forklift unloaded it ,   Then the welders attached lifting eyes onto it.

The shop crane grabbed hold of it  ,,, started to pick it up ,, all 6 lifting eyes tore right off with about a 3/8" thick piece of the plate

stuck to each one ,   From the edge the plate looked like plywood :D

 

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Just because I'm curious and I'm sure you know. Is any steel still made in the US. Everyday I drive through Bethlehem and see the blast furnaces rusting away. I think they last worked in the 90's. In my home town our zinc plant just went  bankrupt and was bought out by American Zinc Recycling. Glad to see someone bought it. A lot of people still work there

 

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1 minute ago, Bdse25 said:

Just because I'm curious and I'm sure you know. Is any steel still made in the US. Everyday I drive through Bethlehem and see the blast furnaces rusting away. I think they last worked in the 90's. In my home town our zinc plant just went  bankrupt and was bought out by American Zinc Recycling. Glad to see someone bought it. A lot of people still work there

 

US (Arcelor Mittal) steel in Gary IN, SDI in middle of Indiana, few other micro mills around.

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3 hours ago, BOBSIH856 said:

US (Arcelor Mittal) steel in Gary IN, SDI in middle of Indiana, few other micro mills around.

That's pretty sad considering what the us steel industry once was

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2 hours ago, Bdse25 said:

That's pretty sad considering what the us steel industry once was

There are actually several large steel mills still in USA still. Google Nucor Steel, they have many plants from North Miss., Crawford IN, Huger SC, there are 2 in Blytheville Ar, and a few other places. Also a roll mill (makes steel sheeting) in Alabama near the Mercedes plant but I can't remember who owns it. I worked at the 2 in Blytheville AR, one is a roll mill and the other makes beams. I also helped build the one in Huger, SC back in '98 and I was at the plant in Crawford, Indiana in the early 2000's. These are HUGE facilities and some of the nastiest plants to work in with carbon piled on every flat surface you can find but it is fun watching an entire school bus run through the chipper in about 10 seconds in the recycle yard. US Steel still has some plants around as well I believe, I worked at the one in Memphis, TN at one time.

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1 hour ago, ArkLa 1086 said:

There are actually several large steel mills still in USA still. Google Nucor Steel, they have many plants from North Miss., Crawford IN, Huger SC, there are 2 in Blytheville Ar, and a few other places. Also a roll mill (makes steel sheeting) in Alabama near the Mercedes plant but I can't remember who owns it. I worked at the 2 in Blytheville AR, one is a roll mill and the other makes beams. I also helped build the one in Huger, SC back in '98 and I was at the plant in Crawford, Indiana in the early 2000's. These are HUGE facilities and some of the nastiest plants to work in with carbon piled on every flat surface you can find but it is fun watching an entire school bus run through the chipper in about 10 seconds in the recycle yard. US Steel still has some plants around as well I believe, I worked at the one in Memphis, TN at one time.

Thought I'd throw this out there.

https://www.cmc.com/en/global/locations/north-america

Steel is alive in the USA, tho not as prevalent as it was in days gone by. Maybe Trump can write an executive order stating that all Fed programs use USA made steel, something that was lacking in previous administrations.

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Yea China has been doing a good job of buying our scrap and processing it and selling it back to us. I did like hearing that if the Dakota access pipeline was built it would be with USA steel. I know everyone wants to get the cheapest goods but I believe if Americans started buying American more in turn wages would go up after the stock market reflected the uptick of sales and profits. I believe, didn't say I knew for sure. I know big corporations are greedy, I work for one.

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