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which.chick

IH 500C crawler; transmission running hot

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I have a early 1970's 500C diesel crawler with the six way blade.  The transmission temp gauge climbs up (it got to 260 before I got weirded out and shut it off) as you run it.  This is new, it did not used to do this.  Machine was not operating under load at the time, was just tooling down the road in second gear (it has the torque converter) without pushing anything; I was test-driving it after blowing out the fuel lines and replacing the fuel filters b/c it had been acting like it wasn't getting fuel and, judging how much better the fuel lines ran after I blew them out -- it hadn't actually BEEN getting fuel.

The transmission fluid (checked on the hex-headed bolt under the seat) is between "add" and "full" on the stick and it's fairly-recently been drained (the stuff I drained looked like a melted creamsicle instead of the nice Virgin Peacock Blood color of Hy-Tran) and replaced with fresh Hy-Tran and new filters under the left floorboard.  It's been stored inside since then and not operated out in the rain, so I don't think there's water in the Hy-Tran.

What other things can I check?

Thanks for any advice you can give!

Jessica

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Welcome aboard Jess !   Not super familiar with the 500's (the experts will be along) Is it an electric powered gauge ?

Could you possibly verify the trans temp with a temp gun ?

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I was going to suggest the same as Kevin.  Get an IR temp gun from Harbor Freight or some place similar.  You will find lots of uses for it!  The sender is by the filters.  You might change the filters again just to make sure that they aren't plugged by stuff stirred up when you changed the fluid?  Also, did you check the suction screen on the lower right front corner of the trans?  You can use a shop vac on the fill port to draw a vacuum and minimize the amount of fluid you loose if you pull the screen..

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Sounds like a plan.  I'll see what I can find out.  It costs me a fair bit to have it loaded up and hauled to my repair guy (he fixed the steering clutches and replaced the torque converter & shattered flex plate for me a couple of years ago) so I'm making sure it's not an easy fix first. :)

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Ok, got my dad's heat gun thing (he got one for xmas).  I located what I suspect is the transmission reservoir -- on the same side of the crawler as the transmission filters (which are under the left foot's floorboard, kinda stacked on top of each other) but more towards the front of the machine, if you remove the angle belly pan support bracket thing and then where that was blocking your view, look towards the back of the machine, your head lower than the upper track, there's a thing sitting pretty near on the belly pan that has a 1.5" diameter pipe coming  from further front that is connected via hose clamp to a smaller bent pipe thing that feeds into what I presume is the transmission reservoir.  You can see it without having to be underneath the thing.  If that's the transmission reservoir, then yay I have found it.  Go me.

 I took the dozer out for a short spin (about ten minutes) until the transmission temp gauge said 215 (It's marked 200/230/260/300 -- I am estimating.) and the engine temp was up to its normal "a hair over 180" that it runs at.  At that point, I aimed heat gun at the suspected transmission reservoir (described above).  124 deg. F.  Aimed at transmission filters which I know for sure what are:  122 deg. F.  Aimed at transmission radiator (took off grill, aimed directly at radiator pipes of small front radiator thing), 123F.  Pulled out transmission dipstick (under driver's seat, cleverly disguised as a hex-headed bolt and located next to transmission fill thing), gun says 128 F for that.  Aimed heat gun at stack for exhaust, it says 200F... so it does go higher than 128... just not on the transmission.

So, maybe the transmission temperature gauge is wrong?  Seems probable, but I've tabled that for the moment.

I also checked the fan belt, which deflects about 3/4 of an inch where it's supposed to and the fan, which blows air through the radiators and the condition of the transmission radiator (the little radiator in front of the main one, it swings down so you can look at it) and it is clean.  So that stuff seems OK.

To check suction screen -- With machine off, remove transmission fill cap, duct tape shop vac nozzle to same aiming for a reasonable amount of seal, fire up shop vac, undo hose clamp on aforementioned 1.5" hose, disassemble from there?  Or does the smaller elbowed thing come apart?  If so, how?  I'm at a bit of a loss as to how it comes apart... but I do have to take off the hose part to get to the screen, right?  (Have sent off for manuals.  Do not have them yet, am not a mechanic, so am flying blind here.)  I didn't want to go there if that was the wrong thing, but I'm pretty sure it's the right thing.

Many thanks for the advice so far.

Jessica

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There is a small bolt that goes into the transmission casting that holds the flange of the suction tube in place.  Remove the hose and bolt and it should twist out.  As I recall it just has orings sealing it.

 

If I were you I would change the sensor before tearing into it.

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Not a crawler guy, but I chased the same thing on a different machine...

Check the grounds of all your gauges. If they are self grounding, pull the back strap and clean the contact areas.

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I was gonna say from my understanding any hydraulic temps over 180 F are bad so I am surprised the gauge has those temps at all.  So I would have almost guarantee the measurement was off.

Google is my friend:

Hydraulic fluid temperatures above 180°F (82°C) damage most seal compounds and accelerate degradation of the oil. While the operation of any hydraulic system at temperatures above 180°F should be avoided, fluid temperature is too high when viscosity falls below the optimum value for the hydraulic system's components.

 

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