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Hay Harvest in the Alps

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Here is a video of hay harvesting in Engelberg Switzerland

 

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Hi U-C ,  

That is  why GPa Otto came  to the USA, he couldn't keep  his  balance on those  steep slopes in Switzerland. lol

Paul 

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Interesting! 

FYI - there is a chapel at the monastery in Engelberg that exceeds the best cathedrals for beauty in my opinion.  Well worth the time to visit while you wait for the Alpine grasses to grow.

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Wow, those things come down with authority.

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Absolutely unbelievable. And milk is so inexpensive. They all looked healthy.  Ken Ryan

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U-C, thanks for posting that. I always enjoy seeing how things are done in other parts of the world.

One thing that I noticed- no one seemed to be in too big of a hurry, it looked like a much more relaxed atmosphere than hay harvest at my place!

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Here is another scene from Engelberg Switzerland this time making wild hay. Wild Hay was once very important because many years ago farmers that had no land had to cut all their hay up in those step slopes but it was also cut by other farmers too as extra fodder. And also for poor farmers that had only goats. The Reason why they still harvest wild hay is to prevent avalanches and because it is tradition in some parts in Switzerland (Canton of Bern, Uri, und etc.)

  

 

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It appears that in earlier times, the whole family got in on the haying?

5957cb6de8e26_MakinghayinSwitzerlandimp.thumb.jpg.1d6f41c6bca8dd705ef01e6bded34cba.jpg

Our relatives had a means to call the haying crew home for dinner too, Urs!  Gary;)

5957ca75ef1b9_Callingthecows-Alpenhorn.thumb.jpg.940a427de665fc1f0f1872c36d353c5e.jpg

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9 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

It appears that in earlier times, the whole family got in on the haying?

5957cb6de8e26_MakinghayinSwitzerlandimp.thumb.jpg.1d6f41c6bca8dd705ef01e6bded34cba.jpg

Our relatives had a means to call the haying crew home for dinner too, Urs!  Gary;)

5957ca75ef1b9_Callingthecows-Alpenhorn.thumb.jpg.940a427de665fc1f0f1872c36d353c5e.jpg

Cool photos Gary, thanks for posting them. Yes back then the whole family helped with the haying but they did that here North America too, love that photo were the lady is carrying the heuburdi. Also love the alphorn you sure can here that from a distance.

-Urs

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Thanks for posting. I knew the association between the Swiss and cable cars but never really thought about the "why" behind it before. Simply amazing.

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Amazing. Absolutely Amazing.

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Here is a silent film of hay making in the Swiss Alps (note not every mountain farmer did it this way). The Goats that you will see in the film are of the Toggenburg breed, I should of posted this first:

-Urs

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Just when I think I've seen it all -- a zip line for hay.  Makes stacking small squares on a wagon behind the baler look like slothfulness.

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A few hours work with a briar side will get the best of most. everything now is a gas power weed eater still hard work

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15 hours ago, Art From DeLeon said:

This was posted on The Bash

https://youtu.be/CboJJ1fhGPw

Steer drive axle or trailers are a cheap alternative to the more expensive transporter, here is another example of a steer drive trailer:  

 

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So, what is the main reason for doing all loose hay instead of bales? I'm guessing that any sort of bale wouldn't stay on those slopes and/ or the snow is too deep to feed them out in the winter but that's just pure guessing.

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I'd think a hay baler would be one heck of a real challenge to operate on those steep hills? Just my humble opinion, as my grandma left those hills of Switzerland to come to America. OBG;)

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On 7/8/2017 at 10:27 PM, yellowrosefarm said:

So, what is the main reason for doing all loose hay instead of bales? I'm guessing that any sort of bale wouldn't stay on those slopes and/ or the snow is too deep to feed them out in the winter but that's just pure guessing.

Making loose hay has always been done there but some do make roundbales but only were it ain't to steep. And all the feeding is done indoors and so did we back when we still farmed in Switzerland (but lived in flat and hilly region of Switzerland).

-Urs

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Austrian Farmer making Hay

 

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so......I missed on how they cut the hay up there on the Alps. How many cuttings to carry you through the winter. Good topic and video

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5 hours ago, littlered166 said:

so......I missed on how they cut the hay up there on the Alps. How many cuttings to carry you through the winter. Good topic and video

lol I forgot to post the mowing videos and pics. Two to three cuttings (but mostly two though I need to check with one of my friends) in other areas only one. The mountain farmers in some regions cut wild hay, called that because its very step and its only cut once every other year (prevents or mostly reduces the chances of avalanches if the grass is short up there).

The Aebi Terratrac's are sold also here in North America for mowing ditches and other step areas

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Here is another machine used to mow in the alps, manufactured by Swiss, Austrian, and German Companies.

Combicut_Aebi_CC66.jpg.b7bd241d979248dc33b7a4faaf47135e.jpg142915280_Aebi_CC66_Portalmaehwerk_Soerenberg7182.jpg.223c3ef5b7461012509ba62e385ed7c9.jpg 

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