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Some good 5488 company photos in the field


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good eye candy

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The MFD tractor seems to be the same one in each photo. But weights are added and a decal of some sort on the side panel.  He must have hit some muddy spots in that bottom photo, I don't see any black paint on the front axle!  

Nice pictures of the old dealer books.

 

Thanks. Matt

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Bottom one has a couple monitors in the cab. One on top of the dash cover and the other right side of the dash. Whoever is driving must own it and seeing how well his mfwd performs in a wet spot. Lol

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On 6/24/2017 at 11:36 PM, Mighty1206 said:

Looks like the mfwd are two different tractors. Different weight bracket, and one has 38 rears and other has 42's. I think

 

Yep, bottom tractor the rims on the dual wheels are drop center to make up the 4 inch difference.  When I left Farmall end of December of '81 there had been absolutely NO talk of 42 inch rubber and rims/tires.  Getting the new tires and rims/wheels into the plant would have been no problem.  Getting the tires into the automated storage and retrieval system would have been no problem.  But getting the rims and dual wheels into the ASRS would have been hard, and time consuming.

During the strike of '79 & '80 we unloaded a couple dozen semi-loads of tires & rims that were shipped but not received and unloaded.  We had problems with the ASRS not accepting skids of rims & wheels for being too wide.  We got them in the ASRS and went on to other projects. When work resumed the engineers fixed the problem by making the "Special Skids" for the ASRS 2 inches narrower,  were 44 inches, now 42 inches.  The storage bays for rims & wheels would only accept skids 42 inches wide and about 41-42 inches tall.  A 42 inch rim/wheel is probably 45 inches tall.  Close but no Cigar!    I suppose they could have stored them out in the yard like they did in the 1960's and early 1970's.  My family would go past the plant and all you could see was skids of rims & wheels stacked 20+ feet in the air. I bet they had 3-4 guys running rims/wheels/tires from the yard to the tire room.

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11 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Yep, bottom tractor the rims on the dual wheels are drop center to make up the 4 inch difference.  When I left Farmall end of December of '81 there had been absolutely NO talk of 42 inch rubber and rims/tires.  Getting the new tires and rims/wheels into the plant would have been no problem.  Getting the tires into the automated storage and retrieval system would have been no problem.  But getting the rims and dual wheels into the ASRS would have been hard, and time consuming.

During the strike of '79 & '80 we unloaded a couple dozen semi-loads of tires & rims that were shipped but not received and unloaded.  We had problems with the ASRS not accepting skids of rims & wheels for being too wide.  We got them in the ASRS and went on to other projects. When work resumed the engineers fixed the problem by making the "Special Skids" for the ASRS 2 inches narrower,  were 44 inches, now 42 inches.  The storage bays for rims & wheels would only accept skids 42 inches wide and about 41-42 inches tall.  A 42 inch rim/wheel is probably 45 inches tall.  Close but no Cigar!    I suppose they could have stored them out in the yard like they did in the 1960's and early 1970's.  My family would go past the plant and all you could see was skids of rims & wheels stacked 20+ feet in the air. I bet they had 3-4 guys running rims/wheels/tires from the yard to the tire room.

So what kind of equipment did they have to mount the tires on the rims?

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8 hours ago, 1967806 said:

So what kind of equipment did they have to mount the tires on the rims?

Frt tires were mounted with a Coats machine like most any gas station would use.  They had two special ( means expensive) machines that were at floor level for mounting rear tires.  The works for the machines were set in pits,  bet they were ten feet deep and ten feet square. They rolled an 18.4 x 38 8 ply on the rim in seconds.  Demo unable rims and duals could both be mounted with those machines.  Bolted to the floor next to each machine was a 4-station assembly tree that the cast wheels wheels were slipped on  axles and the tire & rim assembly was set onto the wheel and the clamps installed, or in the case of the 20x30, 20x34, 21x32, or 27x32 rims, the bolts installed in the riveted on lugs and the rims bolted tight.  Each station had a different size/type axle.  There also was another Special Machine hanging on a hoist by those assembly stands,  a 4-spindle clamp tightening machine, tightened 4 clamps 90 degrees apart all at the same time and was supposed to help the rims run true on the wheels.  All the time I spent around the tire room I NEVER saw either one used!  Yes, they had two assembly stands, had to have two special tightening machines they didn't use.  But one guy armed with a 3/4 inch impact started all the 8, 12, or 16 bolts in the clamps and started tightening them with the impact.  I think the axle spun in the assembly stands,  he could check for runout as he tightened the bolts.  You tighten 100 tire/rim assemblies to 100 wheels every 8 hour shift you get good at getting them on straight.

Before the 2+2 days,  all 145-150 tractors got small frt tires off the small Coats machine.  Kept one guy busy but he kept up.  He had about an hour advance notice of what was coming down the line out of the repair loop. A second assembler installed the front hubs in the wheels with bearings greased and installed. And the tires were conveyed to each side of the line in the order they were needed. FWA tires were mounted separately by the big rear tire machines ahead of time.  Rear tires for 86-series or 2wd tractors were only mounted on 1st shift to feed the assembly line.  There was some sort of conveyor to move assembled tire/wheel/rims the short distance to the line, and surprisingly when they got there, there was a left and a right wheel assembly.  Mounted duals to match an already built tractor were mounted late on 2nd shift, but got top priority if there wasn't the right brand of tire in Stock.  I got several calls at home at 11 PM about tire shortages.  The night superintendent loved to be a jerk I guess.  And all 2+2 tires were assembled on 2nd shift, same rim/wheel/tire as a 2wd but needed 4 per, not 2.  I think tires were the last thing to go on a 2+2 and the type, size and ply tire was broadcast to the tire room for 2+2's when the 2wd tires were transmitted.  There was a "telewriter", in the repair loop, the inspector finished checking everything was done, and he wrote down the tire sizes on this telecaster alone with branch and region order number, and what he wrote printed out by the front tire mounting machine and the tire room supervisors desk.  He mounted up the 2wd rears and kept a list of the 2+2's for 2nd shift.

Every morning there would be a short list of mostly tubeless tires that went flat over the night on tractors in the west yard that needed to be replaced.  There would maybe be a tube type tire that went flat. We kept tubes on hand and could swap out a tube in a few minutes.  Another thing we kept on hand,  replacement water stems, rim nuts, tubeless valves terms, and valve caps.  The big tire machine pits had grates over the pits, drop a water stem or rim nut it was ten feet down to it, grab another one out of a box.  During the strike one day,  tire room guys were cleaning the pits, 5 gallon bucket on a rope.  I complained when they emptied buckets into a huge dumpster because of all the water stems, rim nuts, valve caps being tossed out. They said they would deliver the "stuff" to my desk across the street and I could do the sorting.  There was also tens of thousands of coffee cups and candy bar wrappers, sandwich wrappers, and other trash.  Enough stuff to fill about a quarter of our office space desk top high.

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3 hours ago, SMiller said:

It might not be in any book but I swear some '88 series came from the factory with 18.4-42's.

Oh,  by 1983, or '84 I bet they were available.  I would think they used the deep well rims that fit on the 38 inch cast wheels.  That set of duals on the bottom FWA tractor are made with deep well rims.  The rims and tires were being used by other tractor co's.

 

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20 minutes ago, Art From DeLeon said:

Velie was the name of John Deere's venture into the automotive manufacturing field.

http://p10.hostingprod.com/@veliepartsboard.com/mtvelie/Mtvelie2.html

While Villie worked his way up to Vice President of Deere,  Deere & Co. Had nothing to do with Velie and his companies.

I never actually ate at Velie's but ate at The Plantation many times,  and it was probably the finest restaurant within 400-500 miles.

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12 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Frt tires were mounted with a Coats machine like most any gas station would use.  They had two special ( means expensive) machines that were at floor level for mounting rear tires.  The works for the machines were set in pits,  bet they were ten feet deep and ten feet square. They rolled an 18.4 x 38 8 ply on the rim in seconds.  Demo unable rims and duals could both be mounted with those machines.  Bolted to the floor next to each machine was a 4-station assembly tree that the cast wheels wheels were slipped on  axles and the tire & rim assembly was set onto the wheel and the clamps installed, or in the case of the 20x30, 20x34, 21x32, or 27x32 rims, the bolts installed in the riveted on lugs and the rims bolted tight.  Each station had a different size/type axle.  There also was another Special Machine hanging on a hoist by those assembly stands,  a 4-spindle clamp tightening machine, tightened 4 clamps 90 degrees apart all at the same time and was supposed to help the rims run true on the wheels.  All the time I spent around the tire room I NEVER saw either one used!  Yes, they had two assembly stands, had to have two special tightening machines they didn't use.  But one guy armed with a 3/4 inch impact started all the 8, 12, or 16 bolts in the clamps and started tightening them with the impact.  I think the axle spun in the assembly stands,  he could check for runout as he tightened the bolts.  You tighten 100 tire/rim assemblies to 100 wheels every 8 hour shift you get good at getting them on straight.

Before the 2+2 days,  all 145-150 tractors got small frt tires off the small Coats machine.  Kept one guy busy but he kept up.  He had about an hour advance notice of what was coming down the line out of the repair loop. A second assembler installed the front hubs in the wheels with bearings greased and installed. And the tires were conveyed to each side of the line in the order they were needed. FWA tires were mounted separately by the big rear tire machines ahead of time.  Rear tires for 86-series or 2wd tractors were only mounted on 1st shift to feed the assembly line.  There was some sort of conveyor to move assembled tire/wheel/rims the short distance to the line, and surprisingly when they got there, there was a left and a right wheel assembly.  Mounted duals to match an already built tractor were mounted late on 2nd shift, but got top priority if there wasn't the right brand of tire in Stock.  I got several calls at home at 11 PM about tire shortages.  The night superintendent loved to be a jerk I guess.  And all 2+2 tires were assembled on 2nd shift, same rim/wheel/tire as a 2wd but needed 4 per, not 2.  I think tires were the last thing to go on a 2+2 and the type, size and ply tire was broadcast to the tire room for 2+2's when the 2wd tires were transmitted.  There was a "telewriter", in the repair loop, the inspector finished checking everything was done, and he wrote down the tire sizes on this telecaster alone with branch and region order number, and what he wrote printed out by the front tire mounting machine and the tire room supervisors desk.  He mounted up the 2wd rears and kept a list of the 2+2's for 2nd shift.

Every morning there would be a short list of mostly tubeless tires that went flat over the night on tractors in the west yard that needed to be replaced.  There would maybe be a tube type tire that went flat. We kept tubes on hand and could swap out a tube in a few minutes.  Another thing we kept on hand,  replacement water stems, rim nuts, tubeless valves terms, and valve caps.  The big tire machine pits had grates over the pits, drop a water stem or rim nut it was ten feet down to it, grab another one out of a box.  During the strike one day,  tire room guys were cleaning the pits, 5 gallon bucket on a rope.  I complained when they emptied buckets into a huge dumpster because of all the water stems, rim nuts, valve caps being tossed out. They said they would deliver the "stuff" to my desk across the street and I could do the sorting.  There was also tens of thousands of coffee cups and candy bar wrappers, sandwich wrappers, and other trash.  Enough stuff to fill about a quarter of our office space desk top high.

That's a good story. Stuff I like to read. I can get a picture of it all in my mind. What gets me is all that was probably done way before every one had computers at their desk with email to waste time on.

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All this literature reminds me of something I saw at the show in Des Moines. I'm pretty sure it was Farmall Toms booth that had a 50 series training manual. Sure thought about buying it.

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4 hours ago, 5488ih said:

That "straight talk" literature interests me. I haven't  seen that one before.

Those are build sheet for the future buyer.  The date is in August of 84.  Shows all the options available and the ones they took away.

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10 hours ago, 1967806 said:

That's a good story. Stuff I like to read. I can get a picture of it all in my mind. What gets me is all that was probably done way before every one had computers at their desk with email to waste time on.

Actually, we shared computers with whoever sat next to us.  We got about half a shipping pallet of computer print outs every morning,  hard copy mostly on 11" x14" green bar tractor feed printers.  I can't think of anyone who had anything like a pc.  Heck,  BF Goodrich wanted me to be able to reach them no matter what almost instantly so they put in their own phone line into the plant and gave me the first FAX machine. It was the only one in the plant at first.  A touch dial phone you called the number on, listened for the tones and placed the handset into a saddle.  I got telex's every morning of what Electric Wheel shipped.  Most suppliers I had a dedicated note pad and I'drove call my contact at the supplier and write down the date, trailer number, part number and quantity.  When I knew it was unloaded I'don't cross it off.  Just on my tires, wheels, and rims I needed 17-18 semi truck loads every day to keep up with my usage.  That doesn't include any of my engine clutch parts, stampings, batteries, or o-rings.

Now each computer terminal had an ID number on it,  if you knew the ID of somebody else's terminal you could send them messages.  I did send a couple messages to the tire guy at East Moline, but it was kinda time consuming, you didn't know if it was relieved until you got a message back, just easier to pick up the phone and call.  Plus I didn't see the typed messages ever catching on.  You could only send messages to terminals on IH'started mainframe computer system.  O-Kevin if you handled interlocks suppliers, worthless with outside suppliers.  IH did have a L-O-T of phone pagers.  If you were an upper manager your subordinates or supervisors could reach out and touch you instantly.  They were almost as good as a cell phone.

Think it was 1979 or '80 when IH introduced Trans Net,  it was their own World-Wide satellite based phone system.  Everybody authorized to make phone calls had a 6-digit ID number, from ANY phone anywhere you could access Trans New via an 800-phone number, dial your PIN number, then dial the number you wanted to call anywhere in the world.  Everybody that made calls got a monthly printout of all the calls you made on the system.  My typical day was just over 2 hours spent on outside the plant phone calls talking to suppliers.  It was another 20 years before I worked somewhere that had a phone system even remotely as capable as Trans Net.

IH was pretty well Bleeding Edge on technology.  From my shared system terminal, I could punch a couple keys, get into the other system and punch in ANY IH part number and the system would show me who had any, how many, how many they used per month, how many in the warehouse, standard cost, quantity on order and supplier name, address, and phone number.  Truck part, construction part, ANY IH part number.

 

 

 

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